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Education in the Philippines / Re: Education in the Philippines (revisited)
« Last post by BudM on Today at 03:26:54 PM »
What it boils down to is, wherever you go, there are a bunch of kids who do not know squat about history, math, science or you name it.  The Philippines has their share of kids of who don't care about learning.  The US has their share of kids who don't care about learning.  Any other country has their share also.  This BS about so and so being inferior education to another is just that.  A bunch of BS.  So, the best thing is, whoever wants to send their kids to that country's school or the other country's schools, it is the parents choice.  All I have to say is, my feelings on where my kid is not going has mainly to do with the mentality of a great many of the teachers of whom in my opinion try to influence the kids to their way of thinking.  And I am not going to have certain kind of individuals dominating my kid's list of teachers.  Why?  Because I don't have any use for that type.  So, in conclusion, my kid is going to school here.
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Expat life in Philippines / Re: ‘Foreigners should follow the law’
« Last post by bigrod on Today at 01:13:54 PM »
Agreed, and yet, somethings are bullshit :)     Most of the "bullshit" encounters I have experienced are more of the head scratching variety, such is building lamp posts or telephone posts in the street, or restaurants that have about 20 percent of the food available that is listed on the menu etc.   As far as actual laws, the problem is not really the laws, it is the fact that very few people follow laws.     One drive just about anywhere will reinforce the overall mindset of many people here, or a walk in the "park" that is littered with trash

I have not seen them build lamp post or telephone polls in the streets.  I have seen them extend the street/roads around the existing lamp posts/telephone poles/trees and maybe comeback at a later date and remove them then repair the road. Yes one drive is around will change your driving habits.

See the entrance to your subdivision has finally been completed.

Chuck
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Expat life in Philippines / Re: ‘Foreigners should follow the law’
« Last post by jjcabgou on Today at 10:52:57 AM »
I agree with the 'common sense' approach. It's interesting however, that as a daily reader of the forum for a few years (only recently making input) I've noticed that this 'above' the law attitude causes many of the issues the forum addresses. We foreigners sometimes develop a condescending attitude toward our host and let it show. I for example,  only stay in the PI about 4-6 months a year. Yet, sometimes I find myself thinking 'this is BS, we don't do this or that in San Antonio! Well it's not Texas, or USA or London, Sidney, Paris, etc. etc. We're guests and we should learn to act more like it, even if it's not quite our taste! If we come to their house and act like fool, we should be shown the door!!
Agreed, and yet, somethings are bullshit :)     Most of the "bullshit" encounters I have experienced are more of the head scratching variety, such is building lamp posts or telephone posts in the street, or restaurants that have about 20 percent of the food available that is listed on the menu etc.   As far as actual laws, the problem is not really the laws, it is the fact that very few people follow laws.     One drive just about anywhere will reinforce the overall mindset of many people here, or a walk in the "park" that is littered with trash
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So, the impression I am getting from responses provided is that kids educated in the Phils can readily go just about anywhere in the world, their credentials are accepted as equal (and perhaps superior) to the local grads, and they can earn on a par with kids educated in the U.S. and other western countries.  I am guessing wages in Dubai and those places are as good or better than in the U.S., hence OFWs prefer to take jobs there and not in the U.S., Canada, Australia,  etc. 

The responses also appear to confirm my belief that grads from the PI have a difficult time earning in the range of $5,000 a month or better in the Phils, so they leave.  That remains one reason why I would rather have our son educated in Canada.  Were we to live in the Phils, for him to eventually enjoy the kind of earnings his old man enjoyed all his life, he would have to leave what would be his home country.  That's not a concept that endears itself to me.  When I was completing school in Canada, I did not have to concern myself with the somewhat stark reality of knowing I would have to leave home and perhaps never return except to visit or retire. 

It's reassuring to learn that, despite some "one-offs", the quality of education in the Phils is not inferior to that of western countries. Upthread, I referred to a kid who went through elementary school and who graduated when plainly he had not obtained a thorough elementary education.  That was nigh on 20 years ago and it's probably the case that such a thing could not occur anywhere in the Phils today, and that more rigorous standards are universally applied.
In general the quality of education here IS ABSOLUTELY inferior to most, if not all, 'western' countries.   That does not mean that there are not any good schools, nor does it mean that "some" kids do get a quality education.   I had many Filipinos working for me during my time in the AF and they were all well spoken, intelligent and hard working, when I was going thru cancer treatment, most of my nurses were filipina (3 different hospitals, in three different states), and they were all awesome.   But the vast majority of kids in the Philippines are not getting a quality education, and that is putting it mildly, and that includes many of the private schools.    I have had high school grads ask me "where is Indonesia", "can we land on the sun", or "we have landed on the moon?", these are only a handful of questions I have been asked by high school grads.   In addition, I do have first hand knowledge of provincial public schools and non provincial private schools, and I can tell you, unequivocally, the education system is severely lacking.    Pointing out exceptions does not mean the education system here is on par with other countries.   This is not just an opinion, these are documented facts.
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Education in the Philippines / Re: Education in the Philippines (revisited)
« Last post by Lee2 on Today at 09:56:03 AM »
Let me start off writing, that IMO you cannot make a silk purse out of a sows ear, at least not without continual under thumb guidance, at least that is what I have found in some of our family and friends, so the crab mentality will sometimes, maybe even often, pull those you send to college down if they come from poor and uneducated families, whereas, those that come from educated families will more likely succeed, there will always be exceptions for those who are strong enough to not allow anyone to pull them down. We sent 6 to college and only one graduated and even he could not pass the exam to become licensed, even after us paying for his summer school every year and a pretest course, of course we were not there to make sure he actually went to all those classes, my guess is we spent that money for those classes and he could not have possibly attended them all and still failed but maybe he is just plain thick or another possibility is that he found a way to get receipts for those classes without taking them.

As for salaries, those who get recruited from the Philippines make peanuts when compared to those who have citizenship from first world countries and can go on their own, again, from what I have personally seen, YMMV.

So in conclusion, I do not believe it is as much the education in the Philippines that is bad as the crab mentality of some friends and family, that pull others down. As an example, we had one exceptionally smart young niece that started teaching me Bisaya at the family home when she was around 11, she was great, she made learning so easy for me, we later found out that her family and friends made fun of her because I foolishly said in front of others that she had a special talent to be a teacher and that we would send her to college, she never finished high school because the others continually made fun of her, she would have been a great teacher and could have made a better life for her and her family.


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Education in the Philippines / Re: Education in the Philippines (revisited)
« Last post by BudM on Today at 07:47:48 AM »
So, the impression I am getting from responses provided is that kids educated in the Phils can readily go just about anywhere in the world, their credentials are accepted as equal (and perhaps superior) to the local grads, and they can earn on a par with kids educated in the U.S. and other western countries.  I am guessing wages in Dubai and those places are as good or better than in the U.S., hence OFWs prefer to take jobs there and not in the U.S., Canada, Australia,  etc. 

                < ------- removed some ------->

I don't know about Dubai which depends on what ranking you look at as UAE is either richer than the US or vice versa.  On the other hand, over the years all the lists I have seen, Qatar (UAE neighbor) is consistently on lists as a lot richer than the US.  And I have no less than ten relatives (a brother of my wife, a brother-in-law of hers and the rest 1st cousins) and maybe some I haven't even met yet, who work in Doha, Qatar as OFW.  I never inquired as to their incomes and I don't think they necessarily get the top rate that nationals would of which the nationals population is a way lower percentage than working expats.  Believe me though, the income they do get, puts them in the same light with some family, friends, and others, just like we from western civilizations are and that being is perceived as having more money than we or anyone knows how to or able to spend.
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So, the impression I am getting from responses provided is that kids educated in the Phils can readily go just about anywhere in the world, their credentials are accepted as equal (and perhaps superior) to the local grads, and they can earn on a par with kids educated in the U.S. and other western countries.  I am guessing wages in Dubai and those places are as good or better than in the U.S., hence OFWs prefer to take jobs there and not in the U.S., Canada, Australia,  etc. 

The responses also appear to confirm my belief that grads from the PI have a difficult time earning in the range of $5,000 a month or better in the Phils, so they leave.  That remains one reason why I would rather have our son educated in Canada.  Were we to live in the Phils, for him to eventually enjoy the kind of earnings his old man enjoyed all his life, he would have to leave what would be his home country.  That's not a concept that endears itself to me.  When I was completing school in Canada, I did not have to concern myself with the somewhat stark reality of knowing I would have to leave home and perhaps never return except to visit or retire. 

It's reassuring to learn that, despite some "one-offs", the quality of education in the Phils is not inferior to that of western countries. Upthread, I referred to a kid who went through elementary school and who graduated when plainly he had not obtained a thorough elementary education.  That was nigh on 20 years ago and it's probably the case that such a thing could not occur anywhere in the Phils today, and that more rigorous standards are universally applied. 
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Meet Your Neighbors / Re: Greetings
« Last post by Gray Wolf on April 18, 2018, 11:55:17 PM »
Welcome (back) to the group, Steve! Looking forward to catching up with you!
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Education in the Philippines / Re: Education in the Philippines (revisited)
« Last post by Gray Wolf on April 18, 2018, 11:50:21 PM »
We have 6 nieces and nephews whose education was paid for wholly or in part by Glo and me who all work as OFW's. 4 Electronics Engineers, 1 RN work in Dubai. The other nephew, with a Masters in Computer Technology, teaches at Arba Minch University in Ethiopia. They all make good money. In fact they make enough to invest in property, homes and businesses back home in the PH. I doubt whether the same degree of opportunity for a good paying job is as easily attained in country. This is why I love my family. They work hard for a living, take care of family and will appreciate even more what they have in a few years.
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Expat life in Philippines / Re: ‘Foreigners should follow the law’
« Last post by FRaymie on April 18, 2018, 10:05:56 PM »
I agree with the 'common sense' approach. It's interesting however, that as a daily reader of the forum for a few years (only recently making input) I've noticed that this 'above' the law attitude causes many of the issues the forum addresses. We foreigners sometimes develop a condescending attitude toward our host and let it show. I for example,  only stay in the PI about 4-6 months a year. Yet, sometimes I find myself thinking 'this is BS, we don't do this or that in San Antonio! Well it's not Texas, or USA or London, Sidney, Paris, etc. etc. We're guests and we should learn to act more like it, even if it's not quite our taste! If we come to their house and act like fool, we should be shown the door!!
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