Author Topic: Thirst for Knowledge  (Read 893 times)

Offline jjcabgou

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Thirst for Knowledge
« on: May 03, 2017, 07:11:39 AM »
Is there a thirst for knowledge and the betterment of oneself in the Philippines, or is it really just karaoke, showtime, the voice kids and vice ganda?
Yes I know I am generalizing but...

Offline FMSINC

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Re: Thirst for Knowledge
« Reply #1 on: May 03, 2017, 07:31:26 AM »
You left out Chicken Fights, Fiestas, and Binge drinking

Offline Art, just a re(tired) Fil-Am

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Re: Thirst for Knowledge
« Reply #2 on: May 03, 2017, 09:17:49 AM »
Does watching Fox News (all others are bias/unfair), History Ch 2, National Geographic on TV everyday count as a Thirst for Knowledge? All of the other channels, Filipino garbage variety shows and bias/sensationalized local/international news channels are just a waste of my time.
Most of the time I just go on-line and watch what I want to watch and enjoy.
"Life is what we all make it to be"!
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Offline Lee2

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Re: Thirst for Knowledge
« Reply #3 on: May 03, 2017, 09:38:16 AM »
IMHO the live for today attitude prevents the desire to expand ones horizons, but what do I know, the only thing I do know is that watching the local TV stations here surely has to decay peoples brains. 
:) Happily married since 1994 & live part of the year in Cebu and the rest in S. Florida.

Offline jjcabgou

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Re: Thirst for Knowledge
« Reply #4 on: May 03, 2017, 10:03:07 AM »
I have spent a good portion of my adult life in Asia (since 1991) and only in the Philippines do I find such a lethargic attitude for learning, knowledge, improving, moving forward.   I do not understand this lack of desire to open up to new and improved, to expand your brain etc...
And more sadly, I actually see a resistance to all of the above.

Offline M.C.A.

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Re: Thirst for Knowledge
« Reply #5 on: May 03, 2017, 02:21:51 PM »
JJcabgou  I feel your initial posting is correct it's mostly every day hard liquor drinking, smoking and gambling I experienced all this two days ago at a beautiful resort pool with slides, I was bugged repeatedly and offered a shot saying will you this one time take a shot and my reply now is, no thank you while holding my 10 month granddaughter, of course chain smoking and then alter on gambling with cards... wow same stuff I see in our municipality M - Sunday.  I have lost many local friends and in-laws because I don't take those shots anymore but I sure had a great time with my kids and grand kids at the pool, I must have dived gone down those slides 50 times, I'm a little burned still.  I sort of generalized but there was a Philippine lady teacher that was very friendly and she took the neighborhood kids to the pool, she paid for the transportation but they paid for the pool fee, I also know of 2 Philippine men that won't drink and when we do get to talk it's good and they both speak enough English to make it a good conversation but it's a little lonely here for me.
My views would be from someone who lives out in the province close to in-laws on a pension.  Norwegian and French heritage.

Offline balutsky

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Re: Thirst for Knowledge
« Reply #6 on: May 04, 2017, 10:55:10 AM »
Is there a thirst for knowledge and the betterment of oneself in the Philippines, or is it really just karaoke, showtime, the voice kids and vice ganda?
Yes I know I am generalizing but...

Just look at the Philippine politics.  That is the answer to your question.

Offline JoeLP

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Re: Thirst for Knowledge
« Reply #7 on: May 04, 2017, 02:18:53 PM »
IMHO the live for today attitude prevents the desire to expand ones horizons, but what do I know, the only thing I do know is that watching the local TV stations here surely has to decay peoples brains.

^^^^This times 1000.

This might offend some locals, but just too much laziness in the culture with zero desire to change as a whole. 

I've had the chance to talk to a lot of men and women, both local and foreign(mostly military) about the changes over the years.  And not to beat a dead horse, when Marcos was done, the rise in corruption and problems started.  As a local senior just down the street stated in a party about a month ago, "we traded one big corrupted man who pushed our country forward with 1000 corrupted little men who don't give a damn about the country.".

I think mentioned above, look at the government.  The government is in charge of the schools.  They are a joke.  Sure there are some good ones here and there and not that close inbetween...but most of them are horrible.  Just head shaking horrible.  They system...the setup is the problem and what is broken.  I only lived in 3 states in the USA, but in each state...the state set standards and demanded them met or penalties were leveled.  There were expectations and there was accountability.  Here...nothing.  I've been in inner city schools in the USA that had more discipline than what I see in the average school here.

Again, not all schools.  The school Tina and I sent her boys to was the worse.  A private school even worse than the public school they were in.  Same private school that Tina went to and it made her sick as it was run completely different when she was there.  So same school, just two different people in charge made a good school bad, in this case.

Look at the LTO, Postal system, and all other government run setups.  Corruption and problems.

I bring that all up because it's the PEOPLE of the Phils that allow that.  And they just accept it and have no desire to stand up to it.  None at all.

Now to the flip side.  An anti-marcos person at another party blamed it all on marcos for not allow the people to take part in building up the roads/schools/hospitals and all.  That while he was making those all move forward and improve, she actually said he failed to leave something in place to keep it going and when he ran, all the problems in the backsliding was his fault.  Made me pause to hear that view point, but again, even she said why should the people fix something if they are unable to fix it.

Even Tina will point out problems with the setups/cultures/traditions here...but then just shrug her shoulders saying noone really wants to change it so no point in trying.

The locals, on a whole(not each one) seem much more eager to find a reason/excuse to just let things go than to improve them.  Lazy.  And that, as far as I've seen, is the problem.
In the land of the blind, the one eyed man is king.

Offline suzukig1

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Re: Thirst for Knowledge
« Reply #8 on: May 04, 2017, 05:25:14 PM »
Re: Marcos' accomplishments.  It's often overlooked that all of the accomplishments were done with borrowed money.  Money that could not be paid back in a reasonable timeframe.

http://newsinfo.inquirer.net/774774/well-pay-marcos-debt-until-2025

Of all the myths that had been built around martial law, it is that which claims that one-man rule brought about the country’s golden economic age which is the biggest insult to Filipinos, according to a militant lawmaker.

Rep. Carlos Isagani Zarate, of the party-list group Bayan Muna, said claims of economic prosperity during the reign of the late dictator Ferdinand Marcos were a “manufactured myth.”

“Under the Marcos regime, the country’s foreign debt skyrocketed from $599 million in 1966 to $26.7 billion in 1986,” said Zarate in a statement.

“We are so deep in debt that we have been paying the Marcos debt for the past 30 years since the downfall of the Marcos dictatorship,” he said.

“We will be paying the Marcos debt, which mostly went to their own pockets, until 2025, or almost 40 years after Edsa,” he said…


https://www.brookings.edu/articles/odious-debt-when-dictators-borrow-who-repays-the-loan/

...when Ferdinand Marcos lost power in 1986, the Philippines owed $28 billion to foreign creditors, while Marcos’s personal wealth was estimated at $10 billion...


Offline iamjames

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Re: Thirst for Knowledge
« Reply #9 on: May 05, 2017, 09:19:57 AM »
Is there a thirst for knowledge and the betterment of oneself in the Philippines, or is it really just karaoke, showtime, the voice kids and vice ganda?
Yes I know I am generalizing but...

All true and a few more could be added. Maybe the indifference starts at school level. A high percentage of classrooms do not have seats for the pupils. Books are a rarity and are usually donated junk from the 60s. Teachers are underpaid and have no ambition for the students. More time seems to be spent outside the classroom than inside. Textbooks are non existent even for third level students. Part of their fee is to cover the lecturers photocopying expenses where a few isolated chapters cover the module.

Offline JD

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Re: Thirst for Knowledge
« Reply #10 on: May 05, 2017, 11:38:10 AM »
I think there's a saying that may fit this thread: "They don't know. And they don't know that they don't know."

I recently replied to a post on Facebook by one of the newspapers of note. The story was about a boy with cancer who was beaten up in the bathroom of his school. The boy later died. The headline said there were three assailants. The body of the story said that there were four. They also transposed the mother's gender in the story from "her" to "his".

When I asked how many assailants there really were and pointed out the transposed gender (I mean, if you're a major news source publishing in English, get it right, right?), I was met with a barrage from Filipinos telling me to "read the article". Presumably, they completely missed the 3,4 error. Many of them passed off the gender error as "the way Filipinos do it".

The topper was one young lady who emphatically stressed that the number of assailants wasn't important as the boy was weak and three would have hurt him as badly as four. "What does it matter?" she demanded.

I don't think I've ever seen such hostility to accuracy (except in American politics).
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Offline jjcabgou

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Re: Thirst for Knowledge
« Reply #11 on: May 05, 2017, 01:56:08 PM »
All true and a few more could be added. Maybe the indifference starts at school level. A high percentage of classrooms do not have seats for the pupils. Books are a rarity and are usually donated junk from the 60s. Teachers are underpaid and have no ambition for the students. More time seems to be spent outside the classroom than inside. Textbooks are non existent even for third level students. Part of their fee is to cover the lecturers photocopying expenses where a few isolated chapters cover the module.

I think that is a BINGO....  It is the education system (AND IT WAS NOT BETTER UNDER MARCOS).   We took in two nieces to put them thru school here because it was breaking my heart to see how little emphasis was placed on education where the were growing up.   Many grow up with no expectations, aspirations, significant goals etc.   It is almost burned in their head that this is your lot in life so dont fight it.   :(

 


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