Living In The Philippines Forum

Living in The Philippines => Immigration,Visas to stay in the Philippines => Topic started by: whittler on July 03, 2008, 11:37:54 AM

Title: Retirement visa or Tourist visa?
Post by: whittler on July 03, 2008, 11:37:54 AM
I have never been to the P.I. before. I am retired, and not sure how long I want to stay. What kind of visa do I get, and can I extend it ? Also do they have a retirement visa like Thailand ?

Thanks

whittler
Title: Re: Retirement visa or Tourist visa?
Post by: ray.len on September 07, 2011, 08:58:01 AM
U can extend after the 21 days for another 30 days . Twice then u get an extension for a year. This has to be at an immigration office. If you enter the Ph with your wife then as you go through customs ask for a Balikbayan this will give you 1 year in the ph. You have to be with your wife and show proof of who she is etc. They will stamp your passport for balikbayan giving you 1 year in the ph.
  I did the extension thing before. I left and went back to the states. then found out about the Balikbayan.  You can go on line at the philippineembassy-usa.org and ask about this. They will send you info on it. also if your plane tickets are for longer than 21 days you should have info about the balikbayan   to show them at check in counter departing the us. it is ok to stay longer than 21 days.
Title: Re: Retirement visa or Tourist visa?
Post by: oneiloilokano on September 07, 2011, 09:19:22 AM
The best option is to start with the tourist visa. It\'s easy to extend and relatively cheap. That is assuming you\'re single.
If your married to a local then your best bet is to come here with her and avail of the one year free stay \"Balikbayan stamp\" and if you decide to retire here get the 13a Spousal Visa.

If coming here single you don\'t have to have a round trip ticket, but you need at least a further on destination. Most people will buy a \"trash ticket\" to Hong Kong or Singapore to meet the requirement.

You\'ll know after 1 year if you want to retire here. It\'s best not to go through all the expense of a SRRV (Retirement Visa) until your sure that the Philippines is for you.

Sure the cheap cost of living and Tropical climate attract Retirees. But there are some things unique to the Philippines that some foreigners just cannot adapt to.

Paul in Iloilo
USN CPO Retired, Married and living in Iloilo City since 2002.
Title: Re: Retirement visa or Tourist visa?
Post by: GregW on September 08, 2011, 04:35:33 AM
U can extend after the 21 days for another 30 days . Twice then u get an extension for a year. This has to be at an immigration office.

Actually your first extension is for 38 days making a total of 59 days.  You can also obtain a single entry visa from the Philippine Embassy or Consulate serving your home area that will give you the full 59 days upon arrival.  It\'ll also cost you about half as much as that 38 day extension.  After your initial 59 days you may continue to extend for 16 months.  However you must do this in two month increments, always going to immigration to obtain the extension approx one week before it\'s expiration.  After 16 months you may extend for another 8 months, again in two month increments, but you will need the approval of the head office in Manila each time.  This can be done by having local immigration fax the paperwork to Manila.  That will give you 24 months or a total of two years in country.  At that point you must leave the country.  You may re-enter as soon as you wish and start the extensions all over again.
Title: Re: Retirement visa or Tourist visa?
Post by: Metz on December 16, 2011, 11:35:20 PM
The balikbayan option is what I\'m going to do.  Landing on a 21 day tourist visa by myself, then taking the wife on a quickie 4 day hong kong vacation and returning as balikbayan.  The reason for this is to save on the headache of extending a tourist visa or having a tourist visa expire while in the middle of a 13a application that takes 2 months. 

The wife gets her shopping needs taken care of, and don\'t have to waste time on the extra trips to the BOI.
Title: Re: Retirement visa or Tourist visa?
Post by: Metz on May 17, 2012, 06:58:41 AM
Got my immigrant visa approved yesterday.  Just waiting on my name to show up on the website.  Simple process really.  The info desk at intramuros answered all our questions. No need for a fixer.  Btw there is a free notary at the immigration now. Ignore the scammers outside who are hawking notary services and demanding money for use of the taxis.

After the 5 minute hearing at immigration, took a taxi to LTO. 

2 hours, a drug test, physical, 2 papers and 1100 pesos later I have a local license.  I now have valid licenses for 3 countries, and 2 of them licenses to drive everything including semi trucks.
Title: Re: Retirement visa or Tourist visa?
Post by: BrettGC on January 09, 2013, 11:56:06 AM
Thanks for starting this thread :) It basically answered most of the questions I had regarding the tourist vs retirement visas.  Just to clarify one point though:  The initial 21 one day stay is visa free correct?  I'm a little confused as the Ph Aust embassy site says Australians can enter without a visa for 21 days but I see you guys discussing initial visa applications or is that just for the first up 59 day visa?

This is all great information guys, my planned moved has just come forward a bit :)
Title: Re: Retirement visa or Tourist visa?
Post by: brett4gam on January 09, 2013, 12:25:08 PM
Mate, don't make the same mistake I did when I came here April 2010.  I had the 59 day visa from their consulate in Sydney b4 I came here and thought that it kicked in after the 21 day free period.  It doesn't.  Its 59 days from the day you get here, so I was fined when I went to renew it for overstaying my visa.   >:( 

If you come here for a period of less than 21 days you do not need a visa, but if you plan on staying longer than the 21 days and don't have the visa to cover the initial time they won't let you into the country as I understand it.

Also, something new is the one year multiple entry visa they offer now, mate of mine got it in Sydney last month, he is here now for three months.  However I haven't checked his passport stamp to see if he has to renew it after 59 days here.  It all gets a bit confusing.  I think on my visa I only had a 3 month window to enter the country, but could be wrong so many San Mig Lights later.  Can't check my passport now as their Bureau of Immigration has it for my latest extension and renewal of my card, pick it up tomorrow.  (with more late fees again)  :-\

Cheers
Brett.
Title: Re: Retirement visa or Tourist visa?
Post by: graham on January 09, 2013, 05:47:36 PM
Brett,

Your friend had better go to Immig. and get his passport stamped.
A multiple entry visa just means he can come and go for the period of
time the visa is in force (1 year). If he is here more than 21 days at a time
he needs to get an extension or he will be fined.

BrettGC,

Go to the Phil. Embassy closest to you in Oz and get a 59 day visa straight off.
It's much cheaper to do it in Oz than come here for 21 days and then extend for 38.

Graham
Title: Re: Retirement visa or Tourist visa?
Post by: Lee2 on January 09, 2013, 08:51:55 PM
My understanding of a one year multiple entry visa is that it is good for 59 days every time a person enters the Philippines during the year of the visa, please correct me if I am wrong on that.
Title: Re: Retirement visa or Tourist visa?
Post by: bigrod on January 09, 2013, 09:50:51 PM
The mutiple entry visas should be good for 59 days every time you enter during the validity period of the visa.  Question really is did the immigration officer stamp 59 days or 21 days.  Check passport for stay thru date.  Max is 59 days per entry with out requesting an extension.  FYI the immigration officer can deny entry even with the approved visa. >:( :'( :o

Chuck
Title: Re: Retirement visa or Tourist visa?
Post by: Gray Wolf on January 10, 2013, 12:00:03 AM
And don't wait until day 59 to get your extension.  Get it a few days early to avoid any confusion.   ;)
Title: Re: Retirement visa or Tourist visa?
Post by: brett4gam on January 11, 2013, 09:52:56 AM
Thanks guys for the advice, he is in Leyete at the moment, after a short txt convo he was given the 59 days on arrival.

It all gets a bit confusing, this time for my renewal I was also asked to supply information about how I am supporting myself as I have been here over 18 months now (which was easily arranged)  Its not as if I am living on welfare handouts from the Philippines Govt.  :o

Cheers
Brett
Title: Re: Retirement visa or Tourist visa?
Post by: Rob from Mel on January 11, 2013, 02:05:28 PM
Brett , the government is only looking for a way to TAX you ha ha , regards Robert .
Title: Re: Retirement visa or Tourist visa?
Post by: brett4gam on January 12, 2013, 08:19:51 AM
Brett , the government is only looking for a way to TAX you ha ha , regards Robert .

Haha.  Thanks Rob, I should of realised that! as anything they do attracts fees and taxes.

Cheers
Brett
Title: Re: Retirement visa or Tourist visa?
Post by: Big Jim on January 12, 2013, 01:53:41 PM
Thanks for starting this thread :) It basically answered most of the questions I had regarding the tourist vs retirement visas.  Just to clarify one point though:  The initial 21 one day stay is visa free correct?  I'm a little confused as the Ph Aust embassy site says Australians can enter without a visa for 21 days but I see you guys discussing initial visa applications or is that just for the first up 59 day visa?

This is all great information guys, my planned moved has just come forward a bit :)
If you are going to stay longer than 21 days, arrange a visa.

If you will not leave regularly, make it a 59 day visa which is shown as a 3 month visa on the website.

It is 3 months because you have 3 months from date of issue to use it. Once you enter, you can only stay 59 days without extending. By the way the first extension from 59 days to 4 months costs about P7600. Some people prefer to travel out of the Philippines rather than pay P7600.

If you will be travelling in and out of the Philippines regularly, arrange a 6 month or one year multiple entry visa. Brett described the one year multiple entry as new but it has been around for as long as I have been visiting the Philippines.

If you come in on a one year multiple entry visa, you can still only stay a maximum of 59 days, unless you arrange an extension.
Title: Re: Retirement visa or Tourist visa?
Post by: Big Jim on January 12, 2013, 02:03:11 PM
Thanks guys for the advice, he is in Leyete at the moment, after a short txt convo he was given the 59 days on arrival.

It all gets a bit confusing, this time for my renewal I was also asked to supply information about how I am supporting myself as I have been here over 18 months now (which was easily arranged)  Its not as if I am living on welfare handouts from the Philippines Govt.  :o

Cheers
Brett

Hello Brett

Just in case it is helpful for your friend on Leyte, I read on another forum that every Monday you can now get your extensions in Ormoc City at the city hall. They also do the Emigration Clearance Certificate. It may be more convenient than travelling to Tacloban or to Mandaue City.

Although, a trip to immigration in Mandaue is a good excuse to visit the big city and live it up for a day or 2.
Title: Re: Retirement visa or Tourist visa?
Post by: brett4gam on January 13, 2013, 06:12:28 AM
Thanks sibbick1, good advice, I shall pass that on to him  :D

Cheers
Brett
Title: Re: Retirement visa or Tourist visa?
Post by: graham on January 15, 2013, 11:22:52 AM
Brett,

Your friend had better go to Immig. and get his passport stamped.
A multiple entry visa just means he can come and go for the period of
time the visa is in force (1 year). If he is here more than 21 days at a time
he needs to get an extension or he will be fined.

Graham

Whoops, sorry guys, my bad. I truly thought it was for only 21 days.

Graham
Title: Re: Retirement visa or Tourist visa?
Post by: brett4gam on January 15, 2013, 11:55:11 AM
Thanks to all,

The matter is solved, he checked his passport and it was stamped 59 days.

Cheers
Brett
Title: Re: Retirement visa or Tourist visa?
Post by: FLYBOYRD49 on August 14, 2013, 08:46:57 PM
 :) Hey guys good stuff, my Filipino wife, my daughter and I are retiring in Cebu after 7 years of planning. After reading all the comments it looks like the best is the Balikbyan Visa, that we ask for upon arrival, which means we have to leave the country every 1 year for day. I am curious though about the spousal visa if anyone can elaborate...oh and what about my daughter...anything for her?

Robert D....flyboyusaf....zoomer
Title: Re: Retirement visa or Tourist visa?
Post by: mikbal on August 14, 2013, 09:34:34 PM
   Was you wife still a Philippine citizen when your daughter was born?
Title: Re: Retirement visa or Tourist visa?
Post by: Gray Wolf on August 14, 2013, 10:30:20 PM
:) Hey guys good stuff, my Filipino wife, my daughter and I are retiring in Cebu after 7 years of planning. After reading all the comments it looks like the best is the Balikbyan Visa, that we ask for upon arrival, which means we have to leave the country every 1 year for day. I am curious though about the spousal visa if anyone can elaborate...oh and what about my daughter...anything for her?

Robert D....flyboyusaf....zoomer

The balikbayan privilege is not a visa (see my other post on this today)

If you are married to a Filipina, I would have her file for a 13a Visa.  You have full privileges and never have to leave the country. 
Also, I would make certain to get this done before you move to Cebu and avoid the probationary period and extra fees.

Welcome to the group!   :)
Title: Re: Retirement visa or Tourist visa?
Post by: FLYBOYRD49 on August 15, 2013, 04:21:34 AM
Thanks for the quick reply...and yes you are correct the balikbyan is not a visa, so I guess I will have to get info on the 13a visa, we can probably get this information online and download forms etc...correct?

flyboyrd
Title: Re: Retirement visa or Tourist visa?
Post by: Gray Wolf on August 15, 2013, 07:19:51 AM
You can get all the info you need to decide right here on this forum!
 :)

Start here:
http://www.livinginthephilippines.com/forum/index.php?board=58.0 (http://www.livinginthephilippines.com/forum/index.php?board=58.0)

You'll see several topics under 13a discussing various aspects of the 13a.  I recommend that you get one before you relocate to Cebu.  It will save you money and time and avoid the probationary period.

Title: Re: Retirement visa or Tourist visa?
Post by: FLYBOYRD49 on September 07, 2013, 01:05:08 AM
Planning on keeping a US address and bank, the question is if I am going to live in RP do I need to notify the US Embassy or anyone else, any other requirements, I should be aware of?
Title: Re: Retirement visa or Tourist visa?
Post by: Art, just a re(tired) Fil-Am on September 07, 2013, 01:18:16 AM
FLYBOYRD49,
This topic has been covered extensively here: http://www.livinginthephilippines.com/forum/index.php?board=58.0, (http://www.livinginthephilippines.com/forum/index.php?board=58.0,) but here's my lengthy two cents worth just for you!
Since your wife is a Filipina and will be traveling with her and your child, you will all get the BB stamp good for a free one year stay upon entry into the Philippines! BTW, as a new BI ruling, "balikbayan former Filipino citizens" can just purchase a one-way ticket to or from the Philippines and or other countries! It also includes you and your child, which is a first that I have seen this in print, but not confirmed on the BI gov website, but I do have a Facebook message from BI saying so. (refer to the link "Anyway Around This Rule" half way down the page). So, if one is going to stay in the Philippines for a year or indefinite, why pay the extra cost of a round trip ticket with an on-ward (throwaway) ticket when a Balikbayan is now exempted, but most airlines still don't know this new ruling or they've misinterpreted the ruling! So, it's best to ask your airline where you will be purchasing your tickets to be on the safe side!
One looses money refunding a return and an on-ward (throwaway) ticket!
The round trip and on-ward tickets only refers to regular non-Filipino, non-Balikbayan tourists!

THE ON-WARD TICKET RULE - former Filipino citizens, their spouse and children are exempted
http://philfaqs.com/get-there/do-i-need-a-return-ticket-to-fly-to-the-philippines/ (http://philfaqs.com/get-there/do-i-need-a-return-ticket-to-fly-to-the-philippines/)
In order to avoid any misunderstandings or arguments with any immigration and or airline officials, show them a copy of the article or BI memorandums to back up your statements to the facts or explanations! It would also be wise to send an email to the main BI office in Manila to get it in writing via your email conversations concerning this matter and also have point of contact in the future! 
BALIKBAYAN PROGRAM RA6768
http://www.philippinessanfrancisco.org/philippines-sf/consular-services-sf/faq-sf/#balikbayan (http://www.philippinessanfrancisco.org/philippines-sf/consular-services-sf/faq-sf/#balikbayan)
At least within that year, you can decide what visa is best for you, your wife and children.
Dual citizenship for your wife and children would be the best way to go and if you still have time left, do it there in the U.S., because it's much easier and faster and should only take less than an hour if you get to the Philippine Consulate at opening time! New Philippines passport applications will take 6 months in the U.S. and a few weeks in the Philippines, but a hassle! 
For you the foreign spouse, the BB Program with extensions up to an additional 24 months after your BB stamp has expired, 13a or the SRRV is available to you! There are pros and cons weather to apply for your 13a or SRRV in the U.S. vs doing it in the Philippines! The advantage of still being in the U.S., you can get your police clearance and or your FBI clearance and finger prints alot easier and will be used for your 13a or SRRV application, because once in the Philippines it's a hassle! Just do your own research and decide for yourself!
Other tips that may be helpful:
* Notifying or enrolling with the U.S. Embassy or State Department isn't mandatory, but read the info at the link below and make your own decision to do so or not!
http://travel.state.gov/travel/tips/registration/registration_4789.html (http://travel.state.gov/travel/tips/registration/registration_4789.html)
* Notify your bank and credit card companies that you will be residing in the Philippines, because if you don't they may block your accounts when you try to use your credit cards outside of the U.S.!
* Bring ample amounts of your blank U.S. personal checks so you can write out personal checks for dollar deposits into your local Philippine dollar account, but will usually take 25 days to clear!
Read all the topics on here concerning banking in the Philippines to avoid all the pitfalls!
* About medical insurance health plans! Will your U.S. medical insurance company cover you and your family in the Philippines? Most hospitals here only accept cash up front, maybe except for Blue Cross/Blue Shield and Etna Medical Health Insurance! Since you are retired military, TRICARE here is not the same as in the U.S., you still have to pay cash up front here and then file for reimbursement to TRICARE, which takes a few months to get reimbursed, a real big hassle! BTW, it's best that you update you and your family's DEERS info and military I.D. cards at your nearest military installation before coming to the Philippines!
https://www.google.com/search?q=military+rapids (https://www.google.com/search?q=military+rapids)
 
Title: Re: Retirement visa or Tourist visa?
Post by: FLYBOYRD49 on September 10, 2013, 03:16:30 AM
wow ART, seems that you have done many times....probably cut and paste...LOL anyway thanks for all the info, most of it I researched previously on the forum site as there is so much written, seems as when a new person joins they ask the same questions.

For me, I have most of my plan laid out, I am going to Chicago and get my 13a Visa paperwork started for me and my daughter, most likely in November as that will give me ample time for delays. As for banking, I am using CITIBANK for all of my pensions and SSN to be deposited, of which there are several branches in CEBU. I am also planning to open an account in PNB or BPI so that I can have a an account locally (more than likely it will be my wifes account). I am also planning on getting a VISA or MC thru the Bank as well.
As for medical my wife already as a PHILHEALTH account and I will have TRICARE as well for us.

I am not sure about driving, I am on the fence with this one, I have driven in Cebu before but I have heard so many horror stories that I am reluctant but we will see. I am leaving a US address for voting and tax purposes BUT I am unsure about filing income tax, may need advice on this one. This will happen mid 2014, sounds like a long time but you know as we get older time flies.....:0

Anyway thanks again ART for taking the time to help us.

FLYBOYRD
Title: Re: Retirement visa or Tourist visa?
Post by: Art, just a re(tired) Fil-Am on September 10, 2013, 08:26:49 AM
Yeah, retirement is a stage in our lives of a new beginning when we leave what we have known as the “human rat race” of the 30 to 40 yrs of our working career in the U.S. and leave it all behind us to live in a foreign land where our wives originated from. Hope everything works out for you and your family here in the Philippines! We are truly the fortunate ones, because not everyone can retire nowadays due to the global economy as it is today.
I just condensed everything into one page as sort of an up to date important footnotes useful in planning ones retirement which everyone goes through in planning their move. 15 years ago we didn't know any of these things and just took a "leap of faith" moving to the Philippines after I retired in 1997 with just a small pension and no money in the bank or credits cards, but we were debt free and got rid of everything we owned in the U.S.. We learned everything the hard way day by day trail and error upon on our arrival here in the Philippines, because we didn't have a computer, cellphone, land-line or forums like this to help, but we did fairly well all of these years! We’re now pretty much settled in our ways and doing well and hope all those who have recently retired here experience the same easy way of life into their retirement!
Just a heads up, TRICARE here in the Philippines is a different ball of of wax, because it's not what it is there in the U.S.! Just be sure you have high limit credit cards of at least $25,000 to cover the cost of huge up front cash payments for just in case of catastrophic illnesses or injuries or have a nest egg to it's equivalency, because everything here is a reimbursement type of coverage where you have to file your own claims after the fact and it's very complicated, tedious and frustrating, but at least PhilHealth here will help a little!
There's a Yahoo Group forum of retired military living in the Philippines who has lots of information concerning TRICARE you can check out or join as a member. As for filing your annual income tax, it's a piece of cake if you have nothing to declare in the U.S.! I've used Turbo Tax on-line e-filing, payment owed and or receiving refunds for the past 10 years and only takes about an hour from start to finish doing the EZ1040 short form, maybe 2 hrs doing the long form and doesn't cost an arm and a leg, about less than $60 for the short form on the average!   
Title: Re: Retirement visa or Tourist visa?
Post by: FLYBOYRD49 on September 10, 2013, 09:11:12 PM
ART, I envy you and I am so happy for you that everything worked out for you and your family, it must have been quite an experience when you think back about it.

Yes, you are so right, thinking of retiring after 50 years of working, including 30 years in the USAF, seems very tiring just thinking about it. However; I do feel lucky because I am able to retire, so many of my friends and colleagues cannot retire, they just cannot afford it, most of them will pass on while still working. Our government has made it so difficult for people 60 years and up that they feel that they cannot survive unless they keep working....very sad. Some of my friends had to borrow from their 401k just stay above water, having re-financed their homes, putting their children through college etc! I have a close friend that worked at IBM as a programmer, he worked there for 25 years and at age 59 they let him go.  He still has kids in college and a mortgage, car payment and medical bills. At age 59 nobody wants to hire him so he is doing consultant work for $15 per hour, poor guy. So guys, those of you on this forum never forget how lucky you are and never complain because there is ALWAYS someone worse off than you.
Title: Re: Retirement visa or Tourist visa?
Post by: Lee2 on September 10, 2013, 10:30:03 PM
Yup I thank my lucky stars everyday that I could be retired and I find it a shame that many can't retire and still have to work and also I find that many of those who cannot retire seem to blame others for their own poor planning. I cannot speak of other countries but in the US I have always (after my teenage years) lived below my income even when it was small and I always was the first one willing to work overtime or two jobs and at some points 3 jobs in order to have a better life in retirement but even with good planning many were hurt badly by the downturn, apparently because they did not see the crash coming.  :(
Title: Re: Retirement visa or Tourist visa?
Post by: FLYBOYRD49 on September 11, 2013, 02:33:19 AM
Lee I am happy for you and glad your plan worked, I have so many friends that lost most everything including their savings plus 401k when to downturn of the economy hit. Most of them will never recover and will have to work until they are physically unable to work. That's one of the reasons why my wife and I will by nothing unless forced to that says "made in China"! We have actually found quote alot of clothes made in the Philippines, Indonesia, Thailand and of course India. We do some of our shopping at a local Philippine market but even some of the can goods there are made in China. We are however able to find her favorite SOY SAUCE called White Swan that is made in Makati.
Title: Re: Retirement visa or Tourist visa?
Post by: coleman2347 on September 11, 2013, 01:35:05 PM
Yup I thank my lucky stars everyday that I could be retired and I find it a shame that many can't retire and still have to work and also I find that many of those who cannot retire seem to blame others for their own poor planning. I cannot speak of other countries but in the US I have always (after my teenage years) lived below my income even when it was small and I always was the first one willing to work overtime or two jobs and at some points 3 jobs in order to have a better life in retirement but even with good planning many were hurt badly by the downturn, apparently because they did not see the crash coming.  :(
I totally agree, many of my friends lost most of their retirement account, I was working for DOD at the time and lost a bunch but not as bad as some.  Those of us who are retired military are extremely fortunate.  I wish I could say that I planed it that way but I did not.  Circumstances and a couple of govt. retirement checks allowed me to retire here...
Title: Re: Retirement visa or Tourist visa?
Post by: Art, just a re(tired) Fil-Am on September 11, 2013, 04:01:30 PM
I didn't plan my Civil Service retirement either, because in the mid and late 90s there was a manpower and base reduction going on during President Clinton's administration and the government was offering early Civil Service retirements to those who qualified with 25 yrs of service at any age, but with penalties that reduced one's net monthly pension! Well, I had 30 yrs of service and I was only 48 yrs old in 1997 at the time and I jumped at the chance faster than anyone can shake a stick at, with penalties or whatever and moved to the Philippines in 1998 with my meager Civil Service retirement pension and my tiny 20% V.A. Disability Compensation! 15 yrs years later we're still here in the Philippines and still doing fine! When my other pensions kicked in at age 60 and 62, it doubled my U.S. Government pensions making me a "Quadruple Dipper" and it was all "earned entitlements" with "no freebies" coming out of U.S. tax payer's pockets, I too pay taxes on my earned income!
It sure was a wonderful feeling finally collecting all of my U.S. government pensions, because it took a load off of my mind and we didn't have to pinch pennies anymore from then on!
The only worrisome issue is this TRICARE Standard Military Health Care System fiasco in the Philippines, because it's complicated, tedious and frustrating to get health care and file reimbursement claims! Sure it works as long one has the cash to pay upfront payment in full if one is ever admitted for inpatient care and is patient about filing one's claims after the fact! So far, we have never used TRICARE for any inpatient care! BTW, we do have PhilHealth! Anyway, it's better than nothing at all! "Knock on wood"! :)   
Title: Re: Retirement visa or Tourist visa?
Post by: FLYBOYRD49 on September 11, 2013, 09:17:22 PM
I have been reading most of the posts since joining the forum, especially about all of the requirements, places to live, cost of living etc...I have seen guys living for as little as $700 per month with a family but he lived in a small community on an island. From all of this I gathered that depending on your life style and where you retire in RP an income of $1000 per month is enough, to me that seems like a small amount but again, lifestyle and where you retire is key.
So ART, Lee and Coleman....what you you say is enough for a family of three to survive comfortably in the RP?
Title: Re: Retirement visa or Tourist visa?
Post by: Art, just a re(tired) Fil-Am on September 11, 2013, 10:34:09 PM
FLYBOYRD49.
You have already answered your own question by saying, "I gathered that depending on your lifestyle and where you retire in RP an income of $1000 per month is enough, to me that seems like a small amount, but again, lifestyle and where you live is the key".
Yeah, it's all about "boots on the ground" and to experience your own lifestyle depending where and what is or will be affordable by your family's particular situation and desired lifestyle! Everyone is different! Some like to live a secluded or isolated lifestyle up in the boonies, in a Nipa Hut by the seashore, in the city, province or in the suburbs! Me and my wife, we prefer a modern upscale suburban area with all the amenities like in the U.S., where we live now is pretty close to that somewhat and we're happy and content where we live and have been the past 12 years in our own home, but we need more than just a $1,000 a month just to feed my face alone ;), but granted we can also be happy and content living anywhere in the Philippines as long the weather is cooler and or mild and we can afford the modern Western lifestyle we prefer!  :o ??? ;)
Title: Re: Retirement visa or Tourist visa?
Post by: Lee2 on September 11, 2013, 10:51:21 PM
I have been reading most of the posts since joining the forum, especially about all of the requirements, places to live, cost of living etc...I have seen guys living for as little as $700 per month with a family but he lived in a small community on an island. From all of this I gathered that depending on your life style and where you retire in RP an income of $1000 per month is enough, to me that seems like a small amount but again, lifestyle and where you retire is key.
So ART, Lee and Coleman....what you you say is enough for a family of three to survive comfortably in the RP?

As you and others wrote, it depends on your lifestyle. One thing is to do what myself and others usually suggest and have a couple of high limit credit cards or a bunch of cash in the bank to fall back on but my advice would also be to make believe that cash or credit does not exist except for real emergencies and not wants.

If you wish to live like a local might do and possibly even move in with a wife's family, then you could probably live on very little except if family becomes an issue. I personally do not feel $1000 a month is enough for everything, at least not until you have gotten many of the issues out of the way such as being married, being lucky enough to not have family always asking for money and having a 13a or having already paid for a SRRV and then only having to pay the yearly fees. The one thing I have seen in the Philippines and even in the US is that nothing is a constant, so the rules change all the time and it seems the Philippine govt does its best to part us rich (as they think we are) foreigners with as much as they can, so they keep instituting new things such as ACR cards that end up costing some of us money.

I have a friend who went to the Philippines on about that amount you quoted a month and it was fine as long as he had some money in the bank to fall back on for emergencies and for unexpected things. I believe my friend lives a fairly simple life but he told me this year that he can no longer make ends meet on what he gets.

My former downstairs neighbor in the condo building we live was getting over $1000 a month and as the peso exchange went down, he had to stop his medicare payments in order to survive, that took a trip to the embassy in Manila which cost put him in a hole that he never seemed to come out of and on top of that he got sick and did not have the money for meds and had to borrow from neighbors but he went to the Philippines with cash and bought a condo unit that he later had to sell because his $1000 a month was no longer enough for his lifestyle, so he sold the larger unit he owned and downsized to a smaller condo in another building so that he had money left over but not long after he told me he put that other unit up for sale and once it is sold he wanted to rent a unit in our building which tells me he must have supplemented his income with the extra money he got for the larger condo unit over the smaller one until it almost ran out and now wants to rent with what is left over.

So again it is all about what makes a person happy, their health issues, visa costs and especially the cost of rent and electric which can be the biggest nut out of your $1000. I use my a/c 24/7 due to all the pollution and my health issues, so that cost us about $300 a month alone but used to cost us about $225 a month, no a/c would probably cost us less than $100 a month but we do not have rent because we own, so all we have is condo monthly fees of about $60 and property taxes of about $20 a month and while we used to eat out 5 or 6 times a week, this last trip we only ate out 2 or 3 times a week and still could not live on $1500 a month when we used to live on $1000 a month a few years back. The cost of living has gone up and they exchange rate has gone against us, so IMHO it is better to have more and not spend it than to have less and need more.

If all a person has it $1000 then so be it but then IMO they must learn to live on around $600 a month so they have something to fall back on when the unexpected comes about and they need to hope it does not happen for years while they build a nest egg. In the US there is the govt to fall back on, in the Philippines we (foreigners) are basically on our own. An example of unexpected costs for us is that this past stay my wife's sister needed an operation and her brother got stabbed and needed some help as well with the bills and both of them had some govt assistance such as PhilHealth etc but that did not cover some items and much of the costs, so there is no way I would or could not help them, even if it meant a much leaner life for us or borrowing the money which of course has to be repaid. 
Title: Re: Retirement visa or Tourist visa?
Post by: FLYBOYRD49 on September 12, 2013, 02:22:41 AM
Thanks guys its interesting to hear the views from guys living the dream and in the trenches (so to speak) it seems that we all agree on a few things 1) lifestyle 2) expect the unexpected 3) simple is the best 4) have a nest egg 4) foreigners are on their own in RP.

My wife comes from a community to south of Cebu (ronda) she doesn't want to live there because it is very rural, its at least 2 hours with light traffic to CEBU. I guess I spoiled her because in the US we live in a gated community in the suburbs of a large Metropolis i.e. Nashville. I told her the cost of living would be far less in her home town than CEBU but as you know....I lost that battle :)
Title: Re: Retirement visa or Tourist visa?
Post by: medic3500 on September 12, 2013, 09:51:13 AM
I did the same as Art, grabbing the early retirement. Unfortunately,mine hasn't turned out as well as Arts. I had 30 years federal service but not the age. CPO calculated the retirement I thought that's awesome and never looked back. This was in 2009, I received a letter from CPO beginning of last year saying that they had audited my records, and I have been over paid since day one and they started an auto deduction of $600.00 a month for the next 3 years. That hurts badly when you are retried and depending on that amount. Moral of the story is for anyone looking to retire in the near future, make sure the i's are dotted the T's crossed and you check your annuity over ten times before signing.
Title: Re: Retirement visa or Tourist visa?
Post by: BingColin on September 15, 2013, 03:54:36 PM
I have more than the $1000 talked about here, and I think it would be very difficult, but not completely impossible, to manage on a figure that low regardless of the standard of living.

I took early release/retirement at the age of 53 and that was 23 years ago. I went straight onto a reasonable pension that was index linked. At 65 I received my UK government pension and a few years ago Bing received a partial government pension, both index linked. I don’t know how the cost of living compares between the UK and the Philippines, but we don’t seem to be any worse off. I consider myself to be lucky to be in this situation, but then my father told me to get a job with a good pension, and the early release scheme was a bonus.

I sold my house in the UK which almost covered the cost of building our house here, but we still have a lot of finishing touches to do. We try to budget for a small improvement project every month. We therefore have no rent to pay but still have property tax etc plus water and expensive electricity. We use very little aircon, the house was designed to be fairly comfortable without it. I also feel it important to try to adapt to the climate here although periods of high humidity do make it uncomfortable at times.

We only eat out about once a week when we go shopping, mainly because we get tired of the restaurant food and prefer home cooking.

The biggest problem for us would be medical expenses. I don’t believe that medical insurance is the right way to go. Apart from the fact that at my age, even if I could get it, it would be prohibitively expensive. I think that if you are young enough to be reasonably healthy it is far better to put the possible insurance premiums into saving so that when you get older and your health unfortunately start to decline, then you are covered. None of us really expect to get ill but the body does wear out  :(.

We have helped out relatives with medical expenses and may have spent in excess of P1.5M but it was necessary. We have also made it clear that we expect all family members to have Philhealth as a minimum. We are also paying for the education of the children so that they can get jobs to look after both themselves and the new younger generation.
Title: Re: Retirement visa or Tourist visa?
Post by: Art, just a re(tired) Fil-Am on September 15, 2013, 04:18:52 PM
Colin,
You are fortunate that your retirement went well and sold your U.K. home for a nice profit before the bubble burst in the real estate market!
When the recession hit, it hurt a lot of home owners and investors and pratically lost everything even their jobs!
Yeah, the best anyone can do while they’re still young is to stay employed and save for their future anyway they can, but in a smart way by managing their money wisely! I myself worked since I was 18 yrs old and took an early retirement at the age of 47 with 30 yrs of government service and we moved to the Philippines immediately after retiring, because my small government pension at the time was not enough to live on in Northern California at that time in 1997 which the following year we moved to the Philippines and have lived here ever since happy and content, since I started receiving all of my other pensions at age 60 and 62 doubling my income, I just turned 65 and doing well health wise!   
That’s why the Philippines is so enticing, because of the low cost of living and the Philippine government are now doing their best by changing some of their immigration laws for foreigners to stay longer here in the Philippines, for example: The new 6 month LSVVE tourist visa extension, SRRV, 13a/g permanent resident visas and the Balikbayan Program and for the former Filipino citizens, attaining Dual Citizenship status under RA 9225!   
 
Title: Re: Retirement visa or Tourist visa?
Post by: FLYBOYRD49 on September 16, 2013, 10:08:48 PM
Guys what is really sad is the younger generation, I mean those in their 30's and 40's that will not have SS to fall back on and they can't save any money because most people that I know are living pay to pay.
When you do the math it spells out poverty!
Title: Re: Retirement visa or Tourist visa?
Post by: Metz on November 01, 2013, 08:05:53 AM
There is always the third option visa.  That is a work visa.  With the new BS requirements for a police certificate now it is simpler to get a work visa for 3 years that does not have as much paperwork requirements.
Title: Re: Retirement visa or Tourist visa?
Post by: medic3500 on November 01, 2013, 06:57:41 PM
This is FYI only, I thought I replied to a different message but must have closed before hitting sent.

The BI branch office at SM Mall North Edsa has relocated to the Upper Ground Floor of the Annex next to the new Medical City Clinic. Sign on door states they are open Mon-Sat 0900-1900. I didn't know government offices were open on Saturday or open past 5pm but thats what the sign says. I was there yesterday to renew..

Dan
Title: Re: Retirement visa or Tourist visa?
Post by: coleman2347 on November 06, 2013, 09:47:20 AM
Just an update, we (Maline and I) just got back from Cebu in conjunction with my get out of town trip. Went to the consulate there and got the paper I need to finally get married.  As soon as that's accomplished I will apply for the 13a. 

I just read through this whole thread (again) and thought I would update some thoughts...
If you were single and lived by yourself I think you could live on $1000 usd but dont think you would live very high on the hog.

If your married, she does not work, have kids etc...it really cost a lot...not as much as in the States but close.  Maline and I do not live extravagantly but we do live good.  We put 5 kids through private school (thats going to change next year) and usually entertain her two sisters and their spouses several days a week as they help take care of William and the house.

I was figuring out bills the other night and was surprised that we usually spend about 140k on everything.  With all the kids and relatives we go through a 50kilo bag of rice a month...and god knows how much bottled water...of course all this is my decision to do, most would not have those kind of bills, but as you can see 3k usd just barely covers the bills...fortunately I am a Quad dipper like some and still have a good bit left over...My highest bills are rent, electricity, and school, with food following close...I have a few toys but thats all paid for and I am just talking about monthly bills...

The point is you need to evaluate what you are going to do, what you expect to do very carefully...before I met Maline and made the decision to put the kids through school etc..I usually carried 20k around in my pocket and could do what ever I wanted.  Now (and I am not complaining) if I have 500p in my pocket its a great day....It boils down to choices you make...I made mine and feel great about them but I am sure for some its not their cup of tea....

Its about what you want from here, I have a friend that lives in Angeles and he is perfectly happy being single and just playing the field. Good for him.  I have other friends here that go the family route and love it.  Good for them.  I figured out a long time ago you cant take a dime with you so you might as well make a difference if you can....

I generally love my life here...get pissed off sometimes like anybody...dont like bureaucrats, stuff here that takes five times longer with three times the paper work than in the states...etc...but none of that makes me want to go back to the states where Im considered too old to be of use anymore, would probably die in some nursing home by myself and generally be considered to be in the way of the up and coming generations...

Here I have family...... 
Title: Re: Retirement visa or Tourist visa?
Post by: medic3500 on November 06, 2013, 10:36:04 AM
Have to agree with GW about waiting to the last minute. I found out the expensive way. One of my renewals fell on a Monday and instead of going in on Friday decided to wait to last day and go Monday morning. Monday came around went to BI just to find it was closed due to some non Government holiday or something. Went back on Tuesday and they were unsympathetic to my pleas of them being closed on the due date. Had to pay some fines wait longer than usual. Costly mistake.
Title: Re: Retirement visa or Tourist visa?
Post by: Daddy Robert on April 11, 2014, 03:23:30 AM
Just a note Guys, Since November 2013 you now get up to and including 30 days on entry (used to be 21days)
Cheers 
Title: Re: Retirement visa or Tourist visa?
Post by: BudM on April 11, 2014, 10:03:32 AM
Just a note Guys, Since November 2013 you now get up to and including 30 days on entry (used to be 21days)
Cheers

This is your first post so before someone else asks you, I will.  Who's daddy are you guy?
Title: Re: Retirement visa or Tourist visa?
Post by: Gray Wolf on April 11, 2014, 10:05:50 PM
Just a note Guys, Since November 2013 you now get up to and including 30 days on entry (used to be 21days)
Cheers


Daddy Robert, welcome!  I sent you a PM asking that you post a short intro, did you get it?    If not, you may wish to introduce yourself by posting a brief message telling us a little about yourself.  Click on the link and post it there:
http://www.livinginthephilippines.com/forum/index.php?board=35.0 (http://www.livinginthephilippines.com/forum/index.php?board=35.0)

Thanks!
Title: Re: Retirement visa or Tourist visa?
Post by: macca46 on March 15, 2016, 12:56:18 PM
Hi everyone I am a newbie to the forum I am an Aussie currently living in Thailand on a retirement visa but will probably move to PI in June it would appear that I can come in without a visa for 21 days and then re-apply for a further extension but can I come in without a return ticket?

I have enough money to satisfy visa requirements and receive a pension from Aus. every month.

Thanks in advance,

macca46
Title: Re: Retirement visa or Tourist visa?
Post by: Lee2 on March 15, 2016, 01:16:09 PM
Hi everyone I am a newbie to the forum I am an Aussie currently living in Thailand on a retirement visa but will probably move to PI in June it would appear that I can come in without a visa for 21 days and then re-apply for a further extension but can I come in without a return ticket?

I have enough money to satisfy visa requirements and receive a pension from Aus. every month.

Thanks in advance,

macca46
Welcome to the forum.
It is now a 30 day visa free stay for those people who are citizens of non visa required countries, so since you are an Aussie, then you qualify. As for an onward ticket or return ticket, that is the age old question, the Philippines requires it and some airlines will require it before they will even allow you to board, so yes you need it, but will the airline or BI check it, is anyone's guess, better to have it and not need it, than need it and not have it.
Title: Re: Retirement visa or Tourist visa?
Post by: macca46 on March 15, 2016, 03:12:32 PM
Thanks so what I need to do is find the cheapest return flight to somewhere that I may never use then? if I am understanding you correctly, thanks
Title: Re: Retirement visa or Tourist visa?
Post by: Big Jim on March 15, 2016, 03:39:09 PM
Hi everyone I am a newbie to the forum I am an Aussie currently living in Thailand on a retirement visa but will probably move to PI in June it would appear that I can come in without a visa for 21 days and then re-apply for a further extension but can I come in without a return ticket?

I have enough money to satisfy visa requirements and receive a pension from Aus. every month.

Thanks in advance,

macca46

Immigration do not care where the ticket is to or what the date is on the ticket, just so long as you have a valid ticket to depart the Philippines. And there is usually no need for immigration to check on arrival as the airline will probably not let you board without one as the airline will be fined if you don't meet entry requirements on arrival.

So long as you arrange all your extensions on time, you can stay continuously in the Philippines for 3 years. So, you have plenty of time to decide if you would like to arrange a permanent visa.
 
Title: Re: Retirement visa or Tourist visa?
Post by: bigrod on March 15, 2016, 03:54:48 PM
Thanks so what I need to do is find the cheapest return flight to somewhere that I may never use then? if I am understanding you correctly, thanks

Normally the AirAsia or Cebu Pacific flight from Manila to Kota Kinabalu, Malaysia is the cheapest I have found.

Chuck
Title: Re: Retirement visa or Tourist visa?
Post by: Big Jim on March 15, 2016, 04:13:04 PM
Normally the AirAsia or Cebu Pacific flight from Manila to Kota Kinabalu, Malaysia is the cheapest I have found.

Chuck

From Cebu or Clark as well.

Air Asia had Cebu to Kota Kinabalu flights for something like P1300, taxes included 6 months ago or so.

Their cheap deal on the site today is P1729 Manila to Macau
http://www.airasia.com/ph/en/home.page (http://www.airasia.com/ph/en/home.page)
Title: Re: Retirement visa or Tourist visa?
Post by: macca46 on March 15, 2016, 04:48:10 PM
Thanks guys for the replies at least now I know in which direction I have to take.

Very much appreciated.

macca46


Title: Re: Retirement visa or Tourist visa?
Post by: bigrod on March 15, 2016, 05:01:41 PM
From Cebu or Clark as well.

Air Asia had Cebu to Kota Kinabalu flights for something like P1300, taxes included 6 months ago or so.

Their cheap deal on the site today is P1729 Manila to Macau
[url]http://www.airasia.com/ph/en/home.page[/url] ([url]http://www.airasia.com/ph/en/home.page[/url])


BigJim,

Appears Air Asia no longer has flights from Clark/Cebu to Kota Kinabalu, only from Manila.  Was planning to use it for BB run later this year.  Decided instead to take extended vacation to Kuala Lumpur(7days) then Bali(7days) R/T.

Chuck
Title: Re: Retirement visa or Tourist visa?
Post by: macca46 on March 15, 2016, 07:43:15 PM
This is something else relating to the subject two years ago when I got my Thai visa I had to get an Aus. police check do I need to get this prior to arriving or after I may still have a copy of it will have to check.

Thanks in advance

macca46
Title: Re: Retirement visa or Tourist visa?
Post by: Lee2 on March 15, 2016, 07:47:47 PM
This is something else relating to the subject two years ago when I got my Thai visa I had to get an Aus. police check do I need to get this prior to arriving or after I may still have a copy of it will have to check.

Thanks in advance

macca46
For an SRRV, or a 13a, if married to a citizen, then yes you will need one from your home country, authenticated by your govt and then by the Philippine embassy that services your area. You may also need one from Thailand since you lived there, that I am not sure about but I think you will, does any other member know for sure???

Edit to add, yes a new one, my friend got an SRRV and the lady told him it had to be newly issued.
Title: Re: Retirement visa or Tourist visa?
Post by: bigrod on March 15, 2016, 07:53:39 PM
I think the police reports can only be up to a few months old.

Chuck
Title: Re: Retirement visa or Tourist visa?
Post by: macca46 on March 16, 2016, 04:58:42 PM
Thanks for all of your help it much appreciated.
From what I now understand I can come in on a 30 day visa with a return trash ticket to somewhere then after 30 days re-apply for an extension once I apply for a permanent visa then I will need a current Aus. police check and maybe one from Thailand.

What I am trying to do is make sure that I have all of my base's covered before entering.

Once again thanks all your help has been great

macca46
Title: Re: Retirement visa or Tourist visa?
Post by: Art, just a re(tired) Fil-Am on March 16, 2016, 07:05:39 PM
From what I now understand I can come in on a 30 day visa with a return trash ticket to somewhere then after 30 days re-apply for an extension once I apply for a permanent visa then I will need a current Aus. police check and maybe one from Thailand.
What I am trying to do is make sure that I have all of my base's covered before entering.

macca46
Coming to the Philippines and staying for as long as you want up to 36 months is not complicated. Just be certain that you want to stay here as a permanent resident.
According to this link, you can obtain your police clearance on-line:
https://www.nationalcrimecheck.com.au/ (https://www.nationalcrimecheck.com.au/)
Your police clearance has to be submitted the same time you submit all of your authenticated documents, physical exam results and completed SRRV application with your bank security deposit in place to the PRA office. I would advise that you contact a SRRV representative to assist you with the entire process.
A Philippines NBI clearance is not required if you are within 30 days being in the Philippines since your arrival date. Once your completed SRRV application has been submitted, the process will take 15 to 20 days.

I'm assuming you are single and planning to obtain an SRRVisa. Here's the link to the current up to date 2015 SRRV Guide: https://pramarketing.files.wordpress.com/2015/04/srrv-info-guide_-04-14-15_smaller_2.pdf (https://pramarketing.files.wordpress.com/2015/04/srrv-info-guide_-04-14-15_smaller_2.pdf)
Title: Re: Retirement visa or Tourist visa?
Post by: macca46 on March 17, 2016, 01:19:18 PM
Thanks for that info the police check one is about double the normal fee and on reading up on the booklet it would appear that;

When I apply for a visa that is when I will need a current medical certificate and a current police check.

What I am trying to establish is that I do not need to have either when I first arrive but will need them later is this correct?

macca46
Title: Re: Retirement visa or Tourist visa?
Post by: Art, just a re(tired) Fil-Am on March 17, 2016, 03:09:46 PM
Thanks for that info the police check one is about double the normal fee and on reading up on the booklet it would appear that;
When I apply for a visa that is when I will need a current medical certificate and a current police check.
What I am trying to establish is that I do not need to have either when I first arrive but will need them later is this correct?

macca46
You're correct only if you can do everything that is required where you are presently residing at. For example, I did all of my paperwork in the U.S., which took me 3 months to accomplish and everything was authenticated as a complete bundled package aka a "Red Ribboned" documents http://tinyurl.com/hurcssv (http://tinyurl.com/hurcssv) which included my SRRV application form, physical exam results, police clearance, security bank deposit already with the PRA, source of income, etc and whatever else is on their PRA checklist requirements. (Authenticated and accomplished only at the nearest Philippine Consulate, my cost was only $25 U.S. paid in cash) and upon returning to the Philippines all I had to do was submit my entire "Red ribboned" document package. The PRA will require a second copy of the original documents. After 20 days, my passport with the SRRVisa stamp and SRRV I.D. Card (renewable once every 3 yrs including the annual report - paid in advance, $10 a yr) was ready for pickup which took only about an hour from start to finish, which I did mine at the main PRA office in Makati.