Author Topic: Electricity  (Read 12219 times)

Offline Canuck

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Electricity
« on: February 06, 2008, 10:16:05 PM »
From reading the various posts I gather that electricity costs are extremely high in Philippines.  Is it reliable or are there frequent outages?  As well, for those that own houses there, have you considered solar panels as a way to reduce costs or is that not a reasonable idea.

Offline Rick

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Re: Electricity
« Reply #1 on: February 08, 2008, 04:49:52 AM »
   Electricity costs in PI are the highest in Asia and are higher then most of the states.
The average cost in PI is 10.5 cents US per kilowatt. the average rate among ASEAN countries
is 6.5, I believe only Tx, Ca, Hi and Alaska are higer then that in the US.

Rick

Offline up2u

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Re: Electricity
« Reply #2 on: February 09, 2008, 06:57:48 PM »
3.5 cents in Thailand, my bill here in PH  is 2,300 a month but we hate aircon, so that helps, Alan

Offline michael16136

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Re: Electricity
« Reply #3 on: February 10, 2008, 10:18:06 AM »
It\'s true that the Philippines has the highest cost of power in Asia, and things are going to get much worse before they get better. The power plants in general are old, poorly maintained and an environmental nightmare since most depend on the burning of coal. There\'s been little attempt to invest to meet demand, and unless the donor community starts \"contributing\" additional power capacity, it\'s predicted that soon there will be regularly scheduled brown outs in Manila and perhaps in other areas as well. There have been only sporadic attempts to tap into the country\'s geothermal potential for generating energy, and most of those have been financed by donors. Solar power generation is in its infancy here and again, most of the pilot solar programs have been financed by donors so there\'s not data on whether or not they\'re sustainable. Every now and then, the national government, to great hoopla, announces a \"Power Summit\" to respond to the crisis but, like most of the other government \"programs\" here, the summits typically produce nothing but empty rhetoric.

I live in a four bedroom house in Davao and, though we have five air conditioners, we only run one at a time and even then, only when I\'m in the house, so there\'s no aircon running for most of the week days during the day. Our bills run upwards of Php6,000 a month and we are not profligate in our use of electricity. The power is however, reasonably reliable, and we suffer only 2-3 outages a year lasting typically for two or three hours.

Offline BenK

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Re: Electricity
« Reply #4 on: February 10, 2008, 10:50:47 AM »
I live on the fringe of Metro Manila, and my impression is that electricity is expensive. We live in two adjacent apartments -- one for me and the wife, and one for mother-in-law, the maid, and the kids. Each apartment has one air conditioner, a refrigerator, two electric fans, and a TV, and ours has two computers. We are as frugal as we can be with the electricity, but even in a good month the bill is between 4,500 and 5,000. Even so, it is far cheaper than it was when we lived near Baguio, where the bill for a similar amount of living space minus the fans and aircon was about the same amount.
That\'s not chicken.

Offline coutts00

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Re: Electricity
« Reply #5 on: February 10, 2008, 11:45:10 AM »
I live here in Taytay Rizal, just outside Manila as well, currently we average 3500 a month and we run a small store in there as well.

I know most of this will seem like common sense, but it sure helps with the power bills.

Convert every light in the house to Compact Fluorescent or Fluorescent Tubes

Turn Everything off and unplug it when not in use, there are many things such as TV\'s which drop into stand by and still use power, unplug the dvd player, radio etc when not in use, if you have anything running off of good old 110 then realize your power transformer is sucking juice even when not in use and converting it to heat, so unplug it.

Get the maids and family to turn off every light when they leave a room, even if only for a short time.

Consider a small exhaust fan like the ones used in commercial kitchens, to suck the hot air out of a room before you turn on the aircon, mount it high in the wall or ceiling.

Mount a similar exhaust fan high in the Attic, an attic fan again to suck out the hot air and pull in cooler air.

Find a way to seal the jaloci windows so popular here, I use weather stripping on the top of each pane so it seals the window when the A/C is on.

If you own your own place convert all windows to Aluminum Sliding Windows as quickly as you can afford.

Keep adequate space behind the ref for the coils to do their job, if there is not enough airflow behind the ref, it runs hot and runs most of the time to cool itself instead of just the food.

If you have a dedicated freezer, keep it ice free, each time you open it the moist air rushes in, settles on the surfaces and freezes again, ours freezes faster and cheaper when the maid cleans it down once a week.

For the computer section, go into the power settings on xp or vista, turn off the monitor withing 5 mins of non use, shut down the hard drives after 5 mins of non use and allow the machine to sleep after say 30 mins, its a little more inconvenient during start up, but the savings are significant. Also turn off your printer when not in use, as most of these devices external drives etc, have external supplies, even when the power is off on the device the supply still uses juice.

Have fun

Wayne
Wayne  ;D ;D

Offline coutts00

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Re: Electricity
« Reply #6 on: February 10, 2008, 01:23:40 PM »
Keith,

Most of my air con experience is from the US. But there they use a principle and a device called an economizer, if the outside air is cooler than the inside air, a vent is opened and cooler outside air is mixed with the air con air, this brings down the temp faster and reduces the load on the system and also the power requirements.

One of the things I have noticed here, is they are not big on efficient insulation. I have found fiberglass insulation almost impossible to find at any decent R factor, and they use this very thin expanded foam insulation in the roofs here, right under the sheet iron, not very efficient and almost a waste of money, it is at most a cm thick. I have been looking to replace it with polystyrene sheet, 2-3 inches thick and possibly even using spray on polyurethane foam, it gets into all of the cracks and crevices in the roof and its R-factor is above 30 when 2 inches thick. It does not need replacement and will drop internal temps by 20-30%.

I have been involved with a company from the US that builds Monolithic domes for houses, take a look here. http://www.monolithic.com

Wayne Coutts
Wayne  ;D ;D

Offline jayjayrp

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Re: Electricity
« Reply #7 on: March 04, 2008, 01:22:37 PM »
  electricity costs in PI are the highest in Asia and are higher then most of the states.
The average cost in PI is 10.5 cents US per kilowatt. the average rate among ASEAN countries
is 6.5, I believe only TX, Ca, Hi and Alaska are higher then that in the US.

Rick
e pay more than the 6.5 in Houston, closer to 9.  But in the islands we also
pay about 12 cents per kWh.  But, we do not use nearly as many kWh as we do
in Houston.
JJ Former LinP3 Moderator

Offline jayjayrp

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Re: Electricity
« Reply #8 on: March 04, 2008, 01:28:44 PM »
I can see that where one lives has an impact on costs as well as reliability.
We have an outage at least once a week, usually on the weekends.
We pay upwards to p5000 to p6000 a month, especially if we run a lot
of A/C.  We have the computer on most of the time.  We always have
one or two fans running.  We have a freezer and a frig.  We have the
vonage and we have TV, cable and DSL.... all such power.
Mama even put in a security light.
JJ Former LinP3 moderator

Offline Rick

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Re: Electricity
« Reply #9 on: March 08, 2008, 12:43:20 PM »
  electricity costs in PI are the highest in Asia and are higher then most of the states.
The average cost in PI is 10.5 cents US per kilowatt. the average rate among ASEAN countries
is 6.5, I believe only TX, Ca, Hi and Alaska are higher then that in the US.

Rick
e pay more than the 6.5 in Houston, closer to 9.  But in the islands we also
pay about 12 cents per kWh.  But, we do not use nearly as many kWh as we do
in Houston.
JJ Former LinP3 Moderator

    I\'m suprised that it is that low in Houston. I also live in Texas and just read that the state wide average is over 13 cents per kWh

Rick

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Re: Electricity
« Reply #10 on: March 08, 2008, 06:26:04 PM »
Our electricity bill is around P7000 a month and that is with a small aircon on during most of the day  in my little computer room and a large unit in the lounge on from midday to early evening. This unit is set to 27°C.  We only use fans occasionally in the lounge during the morning, and usually find them unnecessary in the bedroom at night.

Colin

Colin,

Wow P7000 a month :o :o We run a split aircon every night set to 24°C with all the usual electric gizmo\'s & our bill averages around the P3000 level (at the moment with the cooler weather P2-2500 & at the height of summer P4000 ish). We do use fans & windows open during the day which is cool enough. We hardly ever have brown outs.

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Re: Electricity
« Reply #11 on: March 08, 2008, 09:37:10 PM »
Our electricity bill is around P7000 a month and that is with a small aircon on during most of the day  in my little computer room and a large unit in the lounge on from midday to early evening. This unit is set to 27°C.  We only use fans occasionally in the lounge during the morning, and usually find them unnecessary in the bedroom at night.

Colin

Colin,

Wow P7000 a month :o :o We run a split aircon every night set to 24°C with all the usual electric gizmo\'s & our bill averages around the P3000 level (at the moment with the cooler weather P2-2500 & at the height of summer P4000 ish). We do use fans & windows open during the day which is cool enough. We hardly ever have brown outs.


Hi Keith,

we rent an old house with a metal roof and a plywood ceiling with no insulation and louvered windows that leak air. The doors also don\'t fit too well. When we are away, and relatives look after the place they complain that it is very hot. They will not use the aircon. The fact that we don\'t even need a fan at night gives you some idea just how leaky the place is, and this is considered a nice Philippine house  ::)

Colin

Colin

Offline Manila Cockney

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Re: Electricity
« Reply #12 on: March 09, 2008, 02:52:45 PM »
  electricity costs in PI are the highest in Asia and are higher then most of the states.
The average cost in PI is 10.5 cents US per kilowatt. the average rate among ASEAN countries
is 6.5, I believe only TX, Ca, Hi and Alaska are higher then that in the US.

Rick
e pay more than the 6.5 in Houston, closer to 9.  But in the islands we also
pay about 12 cents per kWh.  But, we do not use nearly as many kWh as we do
in Houston.
JJ Former LinP3 Moderator

    I\'m suprised that it is that low in Houston. I also live in Texas and just read that the state wide average is over 13 cents per kWh

Rick

Meralco is 9.178 pesos per kWH, making it just over 22 US Cents per hour. Overpriced and completely out of proportion to the cost of living. I have managed to reduce my bill by changing to  low wattage lights, buying a new energy efficient refrigerator, no long using the hot & cold water dispenser, not using air-con, very rarely use microwave only gas cooker etc. The lowest is still about 5500 pesos. In April and May I do have use air con at night only in one bedroom, and the bill goes between 7 and 8,000. Some of this is also because of the deep well which is used more in the dry months for watering the garden. Talking to the neighbours my bill is on the low side as they tend to use more air con. I am fortunate that my house is on a corner lot, catches the wind has plenty of windows to open and has a 14 foot high ceiling.

Offline Manila Cockney

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Re: Electricity
« Reply #13 on: March 09, 2008, 03:06:34 PM »
Hi Colin,

A cautionary tale on many levels. You clearly had a well thought out strategy to start but good job you had a plan \'B\'. Did you not get a security deposit & advance rental on your house to protect against the tenant leaving owing rent & taking stuff?

It is interesting noting the comparison on buying a plot & building a house to buying a house & lot. I am sure there are people who have had a negative experience but for us, we bought our house as a basic model for P3.5 mil from Avida (a subsidiary of Ayala). Exterior walls, some interior walls,bathroom, driveway etc to complete to our spec added maybe another P500K. Almost 2 years later & we are still VERY satisfied that we made the right choice. We also have a 15 years construction warranty which from our experience of Avida will be honoured.

Hope your dream home goes according to plan.


For buying in a well established residential area, still of the opinion to buy a second hand house and lot. Its a buyers market out there with many houses for sale. A good bargainer with cash in hand will be able to buy a house much cheaper than buying a new lot and house. Apart from paying less it has the advantage that you see what you are buying and you can have it checked out. You also do not need to tie money up while its being build, you hand over the money get the title and it\'s yours to live in straight away.   

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Re: Electricity
« Reply #14 on: March 09, 2008, 03:43:41 PM »

For buying in a well established residential area, still of the opinion to buy a second hand house and lot. Its a buyers market out there with many houses for sale. A good bargainer with cash in hand will be able to buy a house much cheaper than buying a new lot and house. Apart from paying less it has the advantage that you see what you are buying and you can have it checked out. You also do not need to tie money up while its being build, you hand over the money get the title and it\'s yours to live in straight away.   

Not strictly true. If you buy new, you pay deposit  & can have 12 months interest free with most Developers but most or all the money is paid BEFORE the house is completed. The title can also take months after the sale to get. You start with a \'Contract to Sell\' and on completion the \'Deed of Absolute Sale\'.


Meralco is 9.178 pesos per kWH, making it just over 22 US Cents per hour. Overpriced and completely out of proportion to the cost of living. I have managed to reduce my bill by changing to  low wattage lights, buying a new energy efficient refrigerator, no long using the hot & cold water dispenser, not using air-con, very rarely use microwave only gas cooker etc. The lowest is still about 5500 pesos. In April and May I do have use air con at night only in one bedroom, and the bill goes between 7 and 8,000. Some of this is also because of the deep well which is used more in the dry months for watering the garden. Talking to the neighbours my bill is on the low side as they tend to use more air con. I am fortunate that my house is on a corner lot, catches the wind has plenty of windows to open and has a 14 foot high ceiling.

I also have Meralco and I have just rechecked my bill. It says that over the last 12 months I averaged 358 kWh per month i.e less than P3,300 per month. I honestly cannot understand these high bills that others quote unless my well ventilated house, which allows the cool breeze from Tagaytay through, has a big say but the aircon does get used a lot in the afternoon by my wife while she watches Eat Bulaga & her soaps, then again at night so I don\'t see that having a huge impact on the bills.

Bit of a mystery unless split type aircons are much more energy efficient than window types, in which case the extra cost quickly pays for itself. What ever the answer, I am happy with my house being kind on my bank balance.

 


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