Author Topic: Is it possible for me to in anyway gain dual citizenship? and is it worth while?  (Read 1944 times)

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I\'m just wondering if in the big picture would it save me money on Visa fees, or would it be less expensive to just keep getting a perm. card?  Again, thanks for any help.

Offline RUFUS

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Yes it is possible.
Do a search for \"dual citizen\" and you should find most of your answers.
SO SAYETH THE RUFUS

Offline GregW

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jc, yes, you could become a \"dual\" citizen.  As I understand it you are a Kano.  Correct?  If so you can apply for naturalization in the Philippines.  The requirements are 10 years permanent residence in the RP (5 if married to an RP citizen) and you must be fluent in one of the major native languages of the Philippines (English does not count).   It is my understanding that the process takes about 3 years after you apply so you\'re looking at wait of at least 8-13 years.  Obviously there are costs involved but I don\'t know what they are.  This will not have a negative effect on your US citizenship.

In the meantime your wife, whom I believe to be an RP citizen, can naturalize in the US.  She will lost her RP citizenship by doing so but then can reacquire her RP citizenship at the Embassy or Consulate serving your area for only $50 plus an oath taking.  She can also include any children in this process at the same time.

Good luck.

Ako si Goyo.   Amerikano akong lawas pero Bisaya akong kasing-kasing

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Thank you Greg and Rufus.  My wife has kept her filipino citizenship.  Here dad had properties and she wants them and doesn\'t want to risk the possibility of losing that right by giving up her citizenship.  She is a perm. res. of the states.  So she will be fine if we understand the law.  What we are also thinking about is if our son can claim the philippines as his homeland and be considered a natural citizen and in turn have rights to our properites when we pass.  But I put that on another post. Rather badly explained it. But that\'s another post.

Offline GregW

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jc, your wife will not suffer by naturalizing in the US.  Rather she will benefit greatly.  Merely having a US passport for travel is a tremendous benefit.  Should, God forbid, anything happen to you, your wife would then have no problems entering and exiting the US with your children and would not have to worry about renewals of her permanent residency. 

My wife naturalized and then reacquired her RP citizenship using the San Francisco CA consulate.  Filled out some forms, paid $50 and she took an oath.  Real simple, real affordable.  Now as a citizen of both she reaps the benefits from both countries. 

If your wife is hesitant I urge you to urge her to speak to the Embassy or Consulate serving your area and they can put her fears to rest.

Ako si Goyo.   Amerikano akong lawas pero Bisaya akong kasing-kasing

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I don\'t know for sure if it is incorporated in her current status or not, but she has been a perm. res. since 1984.  She has a tax ID, SS build up for when she retires.  She seems to have just about every right I have as a natural born resident of the USA.  Her dad worked in the US Embassy.  I know it cost him a lot back when he did it, but he bought perm. res. status for all three of his daughters and moved them all to Chicago.  (wife cried for a year, no maids :) )  I still laugh about that and it\'s good she can to.  So I really haven\'t looked into to it, and maybe I should, but I guess I just took for granted her perm. res. status in America would take care of all she needs.  She still has to get her passport from Manila to travel, but she doesn\'t ever need a Visa.  I will be attempting to get dual citizenship in the Phils, but first step is to get my perm. res. status in the Phils so I can cut the Visa bills out.

Offline Gray Wolf

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I don\'t know for sure if it is incorporated in her current status or not, but she has been a perm. res. since 1984.  She has a tax ID, SS build up for when she retires.  She seems to have just about every right I have as a natural born resident of the USA.  Her dad worked in the US Embassy.  I know it cost him a lot back when he did it, but he bought perm. res. status for all three of his daughters and moved them all to Chicago.  (wife cried for a year, no maids :) )  I still laugh about that and it\'s good she can to.  So I really haven\'t looked into to it, and maybe I should, but I guess I just took for granted her perm. res. status in America would take care of all she needs.  She still has to get her passport from Manila to travel, but she doesn\'t ever need a Visa.  I will be attempting to get dual citizenship in the Phils, but first step is to get my perm. res. status in the Phils so I can cut the Visa bills out.

I recommend that you look into having her obtain her US Citizenship and then reacquire her Filipino Citizenship.  One thing she would have then is a US passport to use for travel just in case you decide to visit another country.  Many countries won\'t allow a citizen of the Philippines without a prior  visa approval.  With a US passport she can travel with you anywhere.  

She would lose nothing at all in obtaining her US citizenship, but will gain everything.  It\'s a win-win situation with no drawbacks that I can determine.
Louisville, KY USA - Bagong Silang, Caloocan City, PH

 


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