Author Topic: Living & Working in the Philippines (introduction)  (Read 1594 times)

Offline gregpinton

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Living & Working in the Philippines (introduction)
« on: December 12, 2018, 12:00:36 AM »
Hi everyone, i have already posted in a couple of existing topics about visa's and building a tourist business in Palawan, but i have not yet introduced ourselves properly and nor have i posted a topic pertaining to what our future intentions are for living in the Philippines and hopefully running some kind of tourist business there (in Palawan)

Maybe a Moderator can shift this topic to the correct sub-forum category.

I am a 62y/o Australian, married 30 years to my 56y/o Filipino Wife, we live in Sydney, she is an Australian citizen with Australian passport.

My wife has worked in Aust for 30 years, and i am medically retired (a former building contractor) and i receive a small non taxable disability pension income of around au$7,000 per year as my Wife still works so i am not entitled to the full amount.

We recently worked out a plan for what we would like to be doing with our life as we head towards retirement, and we came up with the following plan.

We own a 4 bedroom house and still have our 19y/o daughter with us, but we plan to sell the house within the next year or so, and down size to a smaller and cheaper 2br Unit, and with the remaining cash we will buy 2 side by side duplex/townhouses in a new gated residential development in Puerto Princesa (Palawan) that we will rent out to tenants, or thru Airbnb, or we may buy a free standing 80sm house/lot in the Fernvale Living and Leisure Village in Coron, which they will rent out to tourists for us as part of their resort complex.

We will not be eligible to receive the Age Pension until we are 67, so i have 5 years to go, my wife still has 11 years to go, and if my wife is still working when i hit 67 (she will be 61) i will not get my aged pension because she will be earning too much (it is very unfair that i work all my life and can't get the pension until she retires herself) however i will continue to get free medical and dental under medicare.

So because of this, we decided that we would take a 2 month holiday in Palawan next April/May and look into setting up a small accommodation business at one of the beaches in Palawan, or buy into an existing business, and i will now apply for a 13a visa before we go, which will allow me to live and work there, so i can help run whatever business we have, which in turn also gives me something to do for at least 4 years until my Wife turns 60.

When she hits 60, her employer will let her drop out of continuous full time work and allow her to work for only 6 months at a time, with the other 6 months unpaid leave, so she will then reside in the Philippines for our winter months (April - Sept) and return home to work during our 6 months of warmer weather, OR if things are going ok with the business in Palawan, she will just retire from work completely, set her Superannuation of around au$300,000 aside for a few years so it will accumulate interest, and we will hopefully live off our earnings and rental incomes in the Philippines.

If we decide to end it all in the Philippines for any reason (illness for example) we will have our Unit here in Australia to live in, Wife can return to work if she is under 67, or she can start drawing on her Superannuation until she can get the pension.

As far as the small pension that i currently get, if i leave Australia for more than 4 weeks, i will only get payment for the first 4 weeks, after that it may stop (which doesn't really concern me) unless they do a review of my medical situation and deem my illness to be permanent, then they will continue paying it every 4 weeks into my Philippines bank account in equivalent Peso's, but because i will be living in Palawan, i am not sure yet if i have to declare this small income on any tax return that i may have to complete while living there (more stuff i need to look into  >:()

The Australian Government will pay our Age Pension if we live outside Australia, but we do not get any of the free medical or pharmaceutical benefits that we would normally get if we live in Australia.

We have a few business opportunities ready for us to look at, but as yet nothing can be done until we arrive in Palawan next April, but we now have to look into what we need to do for us to be able to set up and operate a tourist business (or something else)

We are also currently looking at all of the reputable Dental/Doctor/Hospital facilities located in Puerto Princesa (palawan) especially for my treatments and medications (which are non life threatening) and so far it appears to be fairly good, with at least 3 hospitals available to choose from.

Lots of homework to do, but we are hoping our plan can work out something like we hope for, and if anyone here has anything to add to the topic, we would be very happy to read it.

Cheers




Offline FastWalk

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Re: Living & Working in the Philippines (introduction)
« Reply #1 on: December 12, 2018, 08:49:50 AM »
Your goal(s) sound clear enough. 

Just a couple of random thoughts.

- where will Daughter do University,  Au or PH ?
- is is possible to arrange any Au (even small) work that would allow residence in PH ?

If you want to live here,  do it while you can.

Good luck.

Remember, today is the tomorrow you worried about yesterday.

Offline gregpinton

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Re: Living & Working in the Philippines (introduction)
« Reply #2 on: December 12, 2018, 11:18:25 AM »
Our Daughter is 19, but has finished college (year 12 here in Aust) and now works 2 jobs in hospitality (a small bar and a cafe) and she has a boyfriend so she will live here in the Unit we will buy after selling our home.

If i stay in the Philippines and Wife works for the next 4 years until she is 60, then Daughter and Wife will live in the Unit together, if Wife decides to quit her full time job before she is 60 and move to 6 months on, 6 months off, Daughter will live in the Unit while her Mum is living in the Philippines for 6 months.

I think the only way she would give up her job permanently before 60 is if we was making really good money in Palawan from our 2 investment houses and any business that we are running, and she wanted to move there to help run the business.

The down side to quitting before 60 is that her Superannuation will be a lot less, and She wants to have as much as possible for her later years of life, however she can still make her own contributions to that fund if she likes, so it may not be that important in the overall scheme of things.

Here in Aust we can claim any personal contributions into our super fund as a tax deduction each year as well, not sure how that would work for her if living in the Philippines and she contributes into that fund from our business there.

The other thing we need to look into is Taxation in the Philippines, because if i live in Palawan under a 13a visa, and have no taxable income in Aust (which i don't) then i don't need to lodge a tax return here, but any income that i make from working in the Philippines (say drawing an income from our business) then i assume i need to lodge a tax return in the Philippines every year.

- is is possible to arrange any Au (even small) work that would allow residence in PH ?

Are you referring to me or my wife ?

Cheers
« Last Edit: December 12, 2018, 11:34:38 AM by gregpinton »

Offline gregpinton

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Re: Living & Working in the Philippines (introduction)
« Reply #3 on: December 12, 2018, 02:26:27 PM »
Learnt my first real lesson this morning while looking into my Wife's Australian Citizenship and her Filipino Passport, which expired many years ago, and whether or not she still holds Filipino citizenship as well, as she has always believed that she is a dual citizen of both countries, and i have been trying to tell her that she is not a dual citizen of either country, and never has been.

https://remit.com.au/things-you-need-to-know-about-dual-citizenship/

So it turns out i cannot get a 13a visa unless she re-gains her Filipino citizenship, and renew her Filipino passport at the same time, as both requires a face to face interview at the Philippines embassy in Canberra, or the Philippines consulate offices in Sydney.

If she does regain her citizenship and a new passport, she can travel to and from the Philippines using either of her passports, the down side to using her Filipino passport is that they will have to pay the expensive departure taxes prior to leaving the Philippines.

I also found it ironic that in the nearly 28 years we have been married, she has not had Philippines citizenship, but we (she) has bought several beach front lots in various places around Luzon in her name, all of which we sold again 5 years later and making a very good profit.

So unless she gets her Filipino citizenship back, she cannot renew her Filipino passport, nor can i get my 13a, and nor can she buy any property or business, or even work in the Philippines, if what i have read and understood the info correctly in that link above.

Offline gregpinton

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Re: Living & Working in the Philippines (introduction)
« Reply #4 on: December 12, 2018, 03:24:21 PM »
Sorry should i be posting comments about various topics such as Visa's etc (as per the above post) in one of the other sections pertaining to Visa's and travel documentation ?

Offline Peter

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Re: Living & Working in the Philippines (introduction)
« Reply #5 on: December 12, 2018, 03:45:45 PM »
Learnt my first real lesson this morning while looking into my Wife's Australian Citizenship and her Filipino Passport, which expired many years ago, and whether or not she still holds Filipino citizenship as well, as she has always believed that she is a dual citizen of both countries, and i have been trying to tell her that she is not a dual citizen of either country, and never has been.

https://remit.com.au/things-you-need-to-know-about-dual-citizenship/

So it turns out i cannot get a 13a visa unless she re-gains her Filipino citizenship, and renew her Filipino passport at the same time, as both requires a face to face interview at the Philippines embassy in Canberra, or the Philippines consulate offices in Sydney.

If she does regain her citizenship and a new passport, she can travel to and from the Philippines using either of her passports, the down side to using her Filipino passport is that they will have to pay the expensive departure taxes prior to leaving the Philippines.

I also found it ironic that in the nearly 28 years we have been married, she has not had Philippines citizenship, but we (she) has bought several beach front lots in various places around Luzon in her name, all of which we sold again 5 years later and making a very good profit.

So unless she gets her Filipino citizenship back, she cannot renew her Filipino passport, nor can i get my 13a, and nor can she buy any property or business, or even work in the Philippines, if what i have read and understood the info correctly in that link above.

Your wife can qualify for a 13G visa, as a former Filipino citizen, so no need to reacquire Filipino nationality. As a 13G, she automatically gets a spousal visa (for you). 13G gives her some rights, including the ownership of up to 10 hectares of land, but she is not able to vote or stand for a position in an electoral contest. Check with the BI website for the exact requirements.

Peter
Noli nothis permittere te terere.
Virtus autem corruptibilis est,
summa virtute prorsus corrumpitur,

Offline FastWalk

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Re: Living & Working in the Philippines (introduction)
« Reply #6 on: December 12, 2018, 08:49:06 PM »
Your wife can qualify for a 13G visa, as a former Filipino citizen, so no need to reacquire Filipino nationality. As a 13G, she automatically gets a spousal visa (for you). 13G gives her some rights, including the ownership of up to 10 hectares of land, but she is not able to vote or stand for a position in an electoral contest. Check with the BI website for the exact requirements.

Peter


http://www.dar.gov.ph/ra-6657-what-is-carp-comprehensive-agrarian-reform-program

Chapter 2,  section 6.

Isn't 5 hector the limit?  And then 3 more for every child 15 years and older.

Does the 13G somehow get around the CARP setup that regular citizens are under?
Remember, today is the tomorrow you worried about yesterday.

Offline FastWalk

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Re: Living & Working in the Philippines (introduction)
« Reply #7 on: December 12, 2018, 08:58:43 PM »


- is is possible to arrange any Au (even small) work that would allow residence in PH ?

Are you referring to me or my wife ?

Cheers

If your looking for some more income,  some get an assignment from some company in there original country and then do the work in / from the Philippines if even part time.  In case the local business(s) don't perform well,  it won't matter.   
Remember, today is the tomorrow you worried about yesterday.

Offline gregpinton

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Re: Living & Working in the Philippines (introduction)
« Reply #8 on: December 13, 2018, 12:19:28 AM »
Your wife can qualify for a 13G visa, as a former Filipino citizen, so no need to reacquire Filipino nationality. As a 13G, she automatically gets a spousal visa (for you). 13G gives her some rights, including the ownership of up to 10 hectares of land, but she is not able to vote or stand for a position in an electoral contest. Check with the BI website for the exact requirements.

https://liveinthephilippines.com/13a-resident-visa/

https://liveinthephilippines.com/a-few-questions-about-the-13g-visa-eam/

I read both of these articles, and it would appear (if i understand it) that my Wife gets the 13G and i still get the 13A ?

She does not need to regain her Filipino citizenship, nor apply for Filipino passport, she just continues to travel on her Aust passport.

If your looking for some more income,  some get an assignment from some company in there original country and then do the work in / from the Philippines if even part time.  In case the local business(s) don't perform well,  it won't matter.

No, i don't think i want to bother with this, because i understand that if the work i do over there for an Australian business will mean i have to lodge a tax return in Australia if the salary i make exceeds $18,200, which is the amount that Australians can earn here before they need to pay income tax

I would prefer to sell our house and downscale to a 2 bedroom unit, and invest the leftover cash buying 2 or 3 Duplexes or Townhouses in Palawan or Coron to rent out as one form of income, and set up the tourist accommodation business.
 
A friend of ours who married a Filipino who was 20 years younger than him retired at age 65, and he couldn't get his age pension because she worked and earned too much, which he got very angry about, so he and his wife decided to divorce, and he went to live in one of their 2 houses that they bought several years ago in the Philippines, and now he gets his full single person age pension of $902 per fortnight paid to him, only issue is he can't get his free medical and dental care, nor his cheap medication which he was entitled to here in Australia.

It was a divorce of convenience.
« Last Edit: December 13, 2018, 12:43:01 AM by gregpinton »

Offline Hestecrefter

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Re: Living & Working in the Philippines (introduction)
« Reply #9 on: December 13, 2018, 01:07:44 AM »
My thoughts on a business in Palawan (or anywhere else in the Phils for that matter), have formed themselves thus:

For me, were I to invest in a business, I would invest only what I could afford to lose.  If a loss would throw a wrench into your retirement plans, best to stay out.  In fact, I would not consider making any kind of long-term or permanent move to the Phils unless possessed of sufficient wherewithal, obviating the need to generate an income there.  So, if you have sufficient secure income from Australia to see you through and take care of your basic needs, then you are good to go.  Then, if you happen to start a business that actually turns a profit, be happy and look upon it as gravy money; icing on the cake.

A caveat to catering to tourists is exemplified by an experience I had in Palawan a few years ago.  I was there in March/April.  I stayed for a week at one place in Puerto Princesa. It was a nice resort of about 18 units.  Some pesos obviously went into it.  Owned and operated by a European fellow and his Filipina wife.  While I was there, there were never more than 3 or 4 rooms rented.  The owner lamented that business had been good when they first started up, but, over time, a lot more people jumped on the bandwagon, thinking there was easy money to be made.  He said it had become much harder to maintain an occupancy rate that would allow for a profit.  Too much competition and rate cutting.

Another thing.  You mention being "medically retired" (an expression new to me, but I think I get the idea). Does that mean you are quite likely to require medical treatment, drug therapy, etc.?  If so, an important factor to consider is availability and cost of any required treatment.  In another thread, Art commented recently:

Just because a hospital is nearby, doesn't mean their services are inexpensive.
Our neighbor, an American guy had symtoms of an heart attack and went to the nearest hospital just minutes away. He was charged P750,000 for a 1 day stay. His condition wasn't as bad as he felt, but a costly one.

Now, I suspect that P750M tab is something of an outlier, but, at the same time, what I am seeing is improving healthcare in the Phils, but, along with it, a trend to higher costs.  Some 22 years ago, when I arrived in Manila from Los Angeles with my Filipina gf, she was obviously not well.  We were sent to a clinic at NAIA and the doctor there said she should be lodged in a Manila hospital and, in fact, he would not clear her to fly the further one hour to Tuguegarao where family was expecting us for Christmas.  I suggested to the dr. that she had just survived a flight of about 14 hours and that, psychologically (with its corollary effect on the physical), she would do better being allowed to go home to family and not stuck in a Manila hospital.  I promised to put her in hospital there. He relented and we flew.

I kept my promise and she was in for 4 days with pneumonia. Private room, round the clock care, oxygen, meds, the works.  I was castigating myself, thinking "I should have bought medical insurance...I should have bought medical insurance".  On her release, the hospital bill came to the equivalent of about USD180.  Medical insurance purchased before we left LA would probably have cost more.  I was pleasantly surprised (and more that slightly relieved).  But my guess (and yes, just a guess) is that those days are gone.

Offline gregpinton

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Re: Living & Working in the Philippines (introduction)
« Reply #10 on: December 13, 2018, 11:53:40 AM »
My thoughts on a business in Palawan (or anywhere else in the Phils for that matter), have formed themselves thus:

For me, were I to invest in a business, I would invest only what I could afford to lose.  If a loss would throw a wrench into your retirement plans, best to stay out.  In fact, I would not consider making any kind of long-term or permanent move to the Phils unless possessed of sufficient wherewithal, obviating the need to generate an income there.  So, if you have sufficient secure income from Australia to see you through and take care of your basic needs, then you are good to go.  Then, if you happen to start a business that actually turns a profit, be happy and look upon it as gravy money; icing on the cake.

Thank you for the reply, i will try and reply the best i can.

We are not building a business in a place like El Nido where every man and his dog runs an accommodation business or restaurant, because we do not like being in crowded places with millions of other foreigners, we like being out in the more remote beaches and islands where we are surrounded by local Filipino people, and there are many other tourists who would like to do the same, however many of the beaches in Palawan do not have much in the way of accommodation, so they will go there for just a day visit, or not bother going there because of no accommodation.

Our plan is to Lease (not buy) a small titled beachfront lot in Diapila Bay, Bucana Beach, or in Port Barton, and build 2x 25sm cottages to start off with, plus another one for me to live in at the back of the other 2 cottages, and if it works out, we will build a third cottage during the second year, and we will be asking P2,500 per night per cottage, and if we can manage 50% occupancy rate on 2 cottages we should re-coupe our building costs for both cottages in the first year (estimating around P900,000 gross income) plus the first year lease fee, which i believe we can achieve, after that, whatever we make will be ours (less expenses and taxes etc)

Each cottage will cost us P400,000 including a small solar system on each cottage, and the 1,500sm Lot that we was originally after the owner wanted P100,000 per year for 10 years, then he wants us to leave and he keep all the cottages, however his Lot, although having been surveyed (we have the survey plan) is due for titling some time, but he can't tell us when, and i counter offered him P50,000 per year for 10 years, and he keeps the first 2 cottages when we leave if we don't extend the lease, but he has to pay us 50% of the construction costs for the other remaining cottages, but the Lot must be titled in his name before we do anything, however we have now decided not to continue with this particular person because we are going to Palawan next April/May and we was hoping to have a few titled lots to look at by then, and i don't think this guy will have his Title, and i think he is being a bit greedy as well (we already have a family lawyer in Manila who specializes in property law, and he will be the one to help us arrange the legal side of obtaining a property, and with help to set up the business paperworks etc.

The cottage plans i have already drawn up (very similar to the photo image below) and they will be built in prefab format and erected and attached to concrete piers that will be poured into the sand on the Lot, so they can be pulled down very easily, and the reason for Leasing the Lot just meant that we are not out of pocket too much setting up the business, and because this Lot owner refuses to sell the Lot, and if he did, it would be worth a small fortune.

We also had several other clauses in our offer to that Lot owner in Diapila Bay, one of them giving us the option to cancel the lease after 3 years if it did not work out for us financially, as well as we would remove all cottages from the lot, bar the one at the rear of the property that i would be using.

Another thing.  You mention being "medically retired" (an expression new to me, but I think I get the idea). Does that mean you are quite likely to require medical treatment, drug therapy, etc.?  If so, an important factor to consider is availability and cost of any required treatment.  In another thread, Art commented recently:

Ok this basically means that i have a medical condition (Chronic Echzema and dermatitis) that prevents me from carrying out my usual work as a building contractor, as well as a lot of other work that involves doing manual labor work, or working in environments where there is a lot of dust and cold dry air.

So i can sweat here in the heat of summer, or i can be in places where there is a lot of dust, and those things cause me to get very itchy and develop rashes all over me, but whenever i go to the Philippines my condition seems to get better because of the humidity and moisture in the air, and as long as i stay away from Manila or other big crowded cities i am usually quite good, especially near the water with the salty air, clean salty water, and no pollution.

I take a small amount of prescription drugs, but they are all available (i believe) in the Philippines, if not i can have them sent to me if i need them.


 



« Last Edit: December 13, 2018, 12:00:47 PM by gregpinton »

Offline suzukig1

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Re: Living & Working in the Philippines (introduction)
« Reply #11 on: December 13, 2018, 12:40:11 PM »

 i have a medical condition (Chronic Echzema and dermatitis)


 

My sister has had problems with eczema for over 50 years.  In 2017 she tried this stuff (from Australia) and continues to use it today.  It helps her a lot. 

Skin Friend AM and PM.  Also, she follows the diet recommended in their book.  It took about 2 months for most of her eczema to clear up.

https://skinfriend.com/products/skin-friend

Offline gregpinton

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Re: Living & Working in the Philippines (introduction)
« Reply #12 on: December 13, 2018, 11:21:27 PM »
My sister has had problems with eczema for over 50 years.  In 2017 she tried this stuff (from Australia) and continues to use it today.  It helps her a lot. 
Skin Friend AM and PM.  Also, she follows the diet recommended in their book.  It took about 2 months for most of her eczema to clear up.
https://skinfriend.com/products/skin-friend

Thanks for the link, not surprised about the price, as all things natural they are so expensive many people simply cannot afford it, and i certainly gave up hope years ago trying so many natural products and moisturizers because none of them had any benefit.

The drug i take is 20mg of Methotrexate every saturday and then a 10mg Folate tab on sunday, and i need to have my liver bloods checked every 3 months.

This has been my savior drug for 2 years now, after being referred to a wonderful Dermatologist several hours away from us, and it has stabilized my rashes 90%, but as with Echzema, the biggest issue is the itchy skin and if the skin breaks and you scratch it with dirty fingernails or whatever, it is very easy to get Streptococcal and/or Staph infection, and i can be on big doses of Antibiotics for weeks at a time to control mine.

The best Moisturizer i have found is a product called "Lipikar Baume AP+" which has worked the best out of hundreds of moisturizers i have tried previously, and i wish i found it a long time ago.

https://www.laroche-posay.com.au/products-treatments/Lipikar/Lipikar-Baume-AP-Body-Balm-p15942.aspx


Offline Hestecrefter

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Re: Living & Working in the Philippines (introduction)
« Reply #13 on: December 14, 2018, 12:56:32 AM »
gregpinton,

Thanks for the detailed reply.

It sounds like you have done a fair bit of homework and know what you are getting into.  It sounds like it might work out okay and, if not, you won't be left in dire straits.

I like your nipa hut design.  I stayed in something that looked a lot the same once, for about 10 days.  That was on Boracay in 1994.  It was quite comfortable.  That was back before Boracay became overrun as it is now.  Electricity had only come to Boracay about a year before.

Of course, if where you are becomes overrun, you should be in a good position to cash in on it.

Will each cottage run entirely on solar?  Battery storage?

Now that you explained the medical issue, it sounds like something you are able to manage and not likely to lead to major expenses.

So, good luck with the project and please let the forum know from time to time how things are going.

Offline gregpinton

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Re: Living & Working in the Philippines (introduction)
« Reply #14 on: December 14, 2018, 12:16:59 PM »
It sounds like you have done a fair bit of homework and know what you are getting into.  It sounds like it might work out okay and, if not, you won't be left in dire straits.
I like your nipa hut design.
Will each cottage run entirely on solar?  Battery storage?
Now that you explained the medical issue, it sounds like something you are able to manage and not likely to lead to major expenses.
So, good luck with the project and please let the forum know from time to time how things are going.

I will certainly try to keep things updated, but, being married to a Filipino and who has lived away from the Philippines for almost 30 years certainly has its drawbacks, at least it has with my wife, because she doesn't always like the idea of living back there even for 6 months at a time, but i need something to do myself to kill time, and i can't do it here in Australia because of the cost of setting up a business is way out of our reach, and if it goes pear shape, we lose everything.

Leasing a lot in Palawan makes a lot more sense than buying, and who knows, we may decide to give it all up after the 10 years and return to live in Australia full time, at least we will still own a property here to live in.

At the moment the Solar power has not been worked out fully because i need to get advice on which is the best way to do it, but basically each cottage will need to have power for a small chiller/ice box that the guests can take with them on boat trips each day, also power for 2 outlets for recharging tech gear and running a pedistal fan, a ceiling fan above the bed for use at night, and a couple of low wattage LED lights, one inside, one on the deck.

We will build 2 cottages at the front of the lot first, and another one at the back for me/us to live in, then add another one or 2 cottages if the demand is there.

The original Lot that we was offered we have decided not to accept, so now looking for another titled beachfront lot at another beach in Northern Palawan.

Below are my actual cottage plans, will be built in prefab format so i can unbolt the walls, floor and roof in several pieces (flat pack) and remove them from the concrete stumps in the sand, and it also makes it a lot easier to build the sections on a work bench at the rear of the Lot.

« Last Edit: December 14, 2018, 12:35:38 PM by gregpinton »

 


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