Author Topic: Building our house in the Philippines  (Read 90946 times)

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Re: Building our house in the Philippines
« Reply #465 on: May 01, 2012, 09:10:24 PM »
I remember my father always used one in Illinois during the summer and he always said that it saved on A/C costs. †???:-\\ :-\\ :-\\

Offline BudM

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Re: Building our house in the Philippines
« Reply #466 on: May 01, 2012, 11:56:28 PM »
Thanks Colin for the explanation, maybe my idea does not work as well as I thought. †??? I have one in Florida in our home but use it with our aircon on.

When I use our dehumidifier in Florida, I am able to set the aircon temp 2 degrees higher and we are just as comfortable, so humidity seems to be the problem and venting out the heat does not make the aircon work as hard but maybe it is not working as great as I think it is. †

I don\'t use a dehumidifier in Florida.† I have been in an apartment the last 12 years and the aircon has been sick for the last two.† I sure wish I had a dehumidifier during that time.† Anyway, after calling maintenance almost a dozen times over the past two years, they finally changed out what they say was a 20 plus year unit with a new one.† I will tell you what.† That new one hardly ever turns on and it sure is kicking butt.† It is so good that it looks like I will miss it next year.
Whatever floats your boat.

Offline Gray Wolf

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Re: Building our house in the Philippines
« Reply #467 on: May 02, 2012, 06:12:57 AM »
We keep our aircon set between 80-85F (25-29C) We don\'t like it cold.† With the reduction in humidity it\'s perfect for us.† Using fans to circulate the air helps tremendously.† But like Colin says, you must have good insulation and a good weather seal on the doors and windows.† †
Louisville, KY USA

Offline BingColin

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Re: Building our house in the Philippines
« Reply #468 on: May 02, 2012, 08:21:56 AM »
We keep our aircon set between 80-85F (25-29C) We don\'t like it cold.† With the reduction in humidity it\'s perfect for us.† Using fans to circulate the air helps tremendously.† But like Colin says, you must have good insulation and a good weather seal on the doors and windows.† †

We have been in our house since last June and the temperature has never gone much above 29įC that can be OK a lot of the time, but does get very uncomfortable if the humidity gets high. We have never used our old cabinet split aircon that is now installed in the lounge, or the new high level split unit in the kitchen, we may need that when we get the oven and hob installed. I do use the 0.5hp unit in my study at times, it only seems to knock the temperature down to around 27į but it is a lot more comfortable with the obvious reduction in humidity.

It is not a good idea to have the aircon set to a very low temperature otherwise the heat really hits you when you leave the room. It is better to let your body try to adjust naturally with just a little help.

Offline richardsinger

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Re: Building our house in the Philippines
« Reply #469 on: May 02, 2012, 08:40:20 AM »
I remember my father always used one in Illinois during the summer and he always said that it saved on A/C costs. †???:-\\ :-\\ :-\\

Dry air has much less mass than wet air, so it takes much less energy to cool it with an aircon. I\'m not sure how much energy the dehumidifier needs though, and it is unlikely that you can get something for nothing.

Richard

Offline BingColin

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Re: Building our house in the Philippines
« Reply #470 on: May 02, 2012, 05:55:20 PM »
This thread is beginning to make we wonder if we are all looking at this comfort thing the wrong way. The discomfort is mainly due to the high humidity, and not the high temperature. It is possible to be comfortable in temperature higher than we get in the Philippines providing the humidity is low. Homo sapiens evolved in North Africa with sweat glands to deal with the heat. These do not work very well in a higher humidity climate. Perhaps it would be better to concentrate on reducing the humidity rather than the temperature. We would only need a small amount of aircon to prevent the inside temperature from exceeding that on the outside. Wall insulation would not be important, and there would be less movement of air through any gaps because there would not be a temperature gradient. Perhaps even fans would be needed less because the natural sweat evaporation would keep us cooler. Just my vague thought, perhaps other would care to comment on this ;D

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Re: Building our house in the Philippines
« Reply #471 on: May 03, 2012, 07:16:16 AM »

Colin, looks like we\'re right back where we started with this topic. †:-\\ Would a de-humidifier be worthwhile †??? 8)

Offline OldManBill

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Re: Building our house in the Philippines
« Reply #472 on: May 03, 2012, 10:08:22 AM »
Low humidity makes sweat evaporate faster and cools the body more. I live in the South where we get high humidity and high heat. During July and August I can literally sweat through a shirt in minutes. When I worked in construction I would take jugs of Gatorade to the site with me and my clothes would be soaked through by the end of the day. My central heat and air has a built in dehumidifier. There is no way I would live anywhere without one, especially somewhere like the South or RP.

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Re: Building our house in the Philippines
« Reply #473 on: May 03, 2012, 08:22:38 PM »
Low humidity makes sweat evaporate faster and cools the body more. I live in the South where we get high humidity and high heat. During July and August I can literally sweat through a shirt in minutes. When I worked in construction I would take jugs of Gatorade to the site with me and my clothes would be soaked through by the end of the day. My central heat and air has a built in dehumidifier. There is no way I would live anywhere without one, especially somewhere like the South or RP.
OMBill, I can attest to living in the southern climate. Not altogether much different than RP! Hot, humid, and simply sultry! There is only one good thing about the weather in the south...it doesn\'t last 24/7/365!† :)

Offline Giorgio

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Re: Building our house in the Philippines
« Reply #474 on: May 03, 2012, 09:11:55 PM »
Just fired my 1st crew of 5 workers.....for being lazy....and not working until they see me or boss coming.....3rd time this week.

They just been on the job 3 weeks.

It looks like we have to stay on site..watching all the time...sure wish I could trust some of these guys....I would treat very well for good honest workers.

Offline brett4gam

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Re: Building our house in the Philippines
« Reply #475 on: May 06, 2012, 04:55:54 PM »
Part 44

I have just made some changes to my website http://thephilippinejournal.wetpaint.com/ , mainly cosmetic, the photos look a lot better with a black background. If anyone has been reading through the previous posts in this series, you will notice that all the photos are missing; these can be found on my web site.



Colin, I must say that you have been through the ups and downs whilst going through the process of building the house, but the end result is very impressive, congratulations on what you and Bing have achieved!† I had a look at your website and it looks fantastic.

Brett.
I have never seen the world brighter and less prosperous.

Offline BingColin

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Re: Building our house in the Philippines
« Reply #476 on: May 06, 2012, 07:51:36 PM »
Part 44

I have just made some changes to my website http://thephilippinejournal.wetpaint.com/ , mainly cosmetic, the photos look a lot better with a black background. If anyone has been reading through the previous posts in this series, you will notice that all the photos are missing; these can be found on my web site.



Colin, I must say that you have been through the ups and downs whilst going through the process of building the house, but the end result is very impressive, congratulations on what you and Bing have achieved!† I had a look at your website and it looks fantastic.

Brett.


Thanks Brett, we are happy with the results even although there is more work to do. The problems seem to be never ending, the latest one was when the assessors for the property tax tried to take us for P25k but we managed to sidestep that one. If you are a foreigner here you are a target for many corrupt practices, you learn to expect it in the end and try to work around it. Be suspicious of everyone if there is money involved.

I am now working on an independent web site that will contain a lot more than my wetpaint one. It will be some time before it is ready to publish but that is not the important part, it is the learning exercise to create it that is interesting. It will not contain a forum, so I will check with Jack to see if he will allow me to advertise it here. No problem if he doesn\'t ;)

Offline Gray Wolf

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Re: Building our house in the Philippines
« Reply #477 on: May 07, 2012, 12:55:36 AM »
I am now working on an independent web site that will contain a lot more than my wetpaint one. It will be some time before it is ready to publish but that is not the important part, it is the learning exercise to create it that is interesting. It will not contain a forum, so I will check with Jack to see if he will allow me to advertise it here. No problem if he doesn\'t ;)

Colin,

I see no problem with you creating a revised website.† I\'m assuming it will be dedicated to your home construction and the accompanying trials and errors.† When you get close to publishing it, if you don\'t mind, allow me to peruse the content and if it\'s what I think it will be, I have no problem allowing you to post a link to it here.†  :)
Louisville, KY USA

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Re: Building our house in the Philippines
« Reply #478 on: May 07, 2012, 02:55:40 AM »
Would post a pic of our house but don\'t understand the post image function here. Help anyone† ??? ??? ??? :-\\

Offline BingColin

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Re: Building our house in the Philippines
« Reply #479 on: May 07, 2012, 08:22:45 AM »
I am now working on an independent web site that will contain a lot more than my wetpaint one. It will be some time before it is ready to publish but that is not the important part, it is the learning exercise to create it that is interesting. It will not contain a forum, so I will check with Jack to see if he will allow me to advertise it here. No problem if he doesn\'t ;)


Colin,

I see no problem with you creating a revised website.† I\'m assuming it will be dedicated to your home construction and the accompanying trials and errors.† When you get close to publishing it, if you don\'t mind, allow me to peruse the content and if it\'s what I think it will be, I have no problem allowing you to post a link to it here.† †:)


It will contain ALL my experiences of the Philippines, a sort of Philippine biography. I am including everything in my wetpaint site but hopefully with effects such as fades and scrolling text. I have also just found a free program called jAlbum http://jalbum.net/en/ that can be included to give a versatile photo album. This will allow a slide show which could be useful.

I have always liked the idea of publishing a book, but this is a lot easier.

Jack, when it eventually (?) gets published I will give you the link and wonít put it on the forum without your permission.

Donít hold your breath, it could be a while yet ;D It is one of many projects and just the current one.

Gotta keep the brain active even if the body is slowing down ;D

 


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