Author Topic: Organic garden  (Read 3945 times)

Offline callme

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Organic garden
« on: June 13, 2009, 05:56:24 AM »
I really hope i can afford a lot big enough for a proper garden when I retire in this paradise.

I want fruits, veggies and flowers

Anyone who have any experience in organic farming/gardening in ph?

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Re: Organic garden
« Reply #1 on: June 13, 2009, 06:52:21 AM »
This is something that I also hope to do in the near future, and I am particularly interested in square foot gardening http://squarefootgardening.com, I see that there is a Filipina practicing it here in the Philippines. I would like to plant at least one tree of every fruit I can find, grow the  vegetables that are hard to find here such as good tomatoes and celery, and naturally lots of orchids  ;D

Colin

Offline grizzi

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Re: Organic garden
« Reply #2 on: June 13, 2009, 11:52:51 AM »
I\'m looking at doing the same thing, but also want to purchase some rice fields for the purpose of sustainability.  Basically, we are trying to find a piece of land that we can build our retirment house on, and put a nice garden on for fresh veggies and some fruit trees.  So far, we have seen many properties, but not exactly what we want.  A nice garden spot is something I will be needing to keep me busy during my retirement... ;D
Greg & Almira  ;-)

Offline fred

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Re: Organic garden
« Reply #3 on: June 22, 2009, 02:35:35 PM »
If you want to grow leaf veg like cabbage etc then make sure they are covered with fine nets..I had around 50 cabbage that were completely destroyed by a small green worms..The pests here can be a nightmare and it wont be long before you will want to bombard them with something that may not be so organic friendly.IMO

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Re: Organic garden
« Reply #4 on: June 23, 2009, 12:24:53 PM »
We have a veggie garden, small as it is.

If you figure on playing, \"what if\"  with foreign seeds in this Country and depending on the location, you just might be more dis-appointed for your efforts? I\'ve all but given up on that.

We can buy worm casting and have a Pinoy gather dried cow pies for the garden/flower soil.

We also raise chickens for the freezer and the latest, fresh water fish in hollow block tanks.

If you find that you don\'t have the grown to work with, you can always go container gardening.
B-Ray

Offline RUFUS

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Re: Organic garden
« Reply #5 on: June 23, 2009, 01:43:59 PM »
B-Ray,
No luck on the seeds i sent?
Did anything grow?
SO SAYETH THE RUFUS

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Re: Organic garden
« Reply #6 on: June 24, 2009, 02:36:59 PM »
OOOppps guy, very few are still in the bottom of the frig. Don\'t remember which ones, but the others, nothing got to the point of producing anything.

We don\'t do cems in our garden and maybe the reason?

I\'ll see if my wife has a better green thumb then me!
B-Ray



B-Ray,
No luck on the seeds i sent?
Did anything grow?

Offline c_a_p_t_a_i_n_r_o_n

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Re: Organic garden
« Reply #7 on: June 24, 2009, 04:36:37 PM »
We\'re going for the orchard look

Recently added 9 mango trees to the 3 mature ones we have on ur building lot
So that\'s 12 mangos, 12 dwarf coconut, 12 tandan, 12 pineapple, 2 guabano, 2 orange, 2  calamansi

veggie garden contains onions, garlic, peppers, camote but that\'s Glo\'s area

All doing pretty well

Except Glo\'s sisters efforts at growing corn


Offline jamesmusslewhite

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Re: Organic garden
« Reply #8 on: June 25, 2009, 12:31:09 AM »
I am a retired Horticulturist/ Agriculturist, Master Gardener, Master Propagator, and Certified Texas Horticulturist; and have been in this field for over 30 years in the Texas Gulf coast region. South Texas is Sub-Tropic with annual rains of 80\". The conditions there are almost exactly the same as here. I also shipped my Horticulture library, and will gladly assist anyone with the best information at my disposal. 
We have a 6-1/2 hector (aprox. 18 acres) coconut and rice farm (1,800 Mature Coconut Trees and 2 hectors Rice and Caladium fields) on Dinagat Island which is 45 minutes by boat from Surigao City. We are harvesting Copra this week. Three Copra harvest and 3 rice harvest a year. I am trying to fully convert to Organic fertilizer and natural compost, plus implementing square foot gardening techniques. I am consulting with the Philippines Agriculture Department here in Surigao Del Norte. I am well acquainted with Square Foot Gardening, having first seen it in Okinawa in 1984. I have designed, built, and maintained these types of gardens most of my career. The best book on the subject is\"
\"Square Foot Gardening\" by Mel Bartholmew
Rodale Press Emmaus, Pennsylvania
 
Some say wonder why? Others say why wonder?
Some say the glass is half full. Others say the glass is half empty.

I wonder why that damn glass is twice as big as it needs to be !!!

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Re: Organic garden
« Reply #9 on: June 25, 2009, 08:01:40 AM »
That\' s good to know, I will be picking your brain in the near future.  ;D As a starter, could you post a recipe for compost to use in a square foot garden using materials that are readily available here in the Philippines?

Colin

Offline jamesmusslewhite

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Re: Organic garden
« Reply #10 on: June 25, 2009, 09:42:39 AM »
Colin,

I will dust off the books and contact some friends in the Aggie departments here.
I only need to know;
a.) what you want to grow? (to insure the proper PH level required)
b.) where do you live? (needed for: annual rain fall amounts, area soil composition, soil average PH levels)

These two simple questions will allow me to research the local Agricultural department and to write up the most efficient mix. Your compost can well prepared and nutrient enriched, but if the soil PH is wrong it will have very little effect on the over all production of your crop.
Some say wonder why? Others say why wonder?
Some say the glass is half full. Others say the glass is half empty.

I wonder why that damn glass is twice as big as it needs to be !!!

  • Guest
Re: Organic garden
« Reply #11 on: June 25, 2009, 11:00:08 AM »
Colin,

I will dust off the books and contact some friends in the Aggie departments here.
I only need to know;
a.) what you want to grow? (to insure the proper PH level required)
b.) where do you live? (needed for: annual rain fall amounts, area soil composition, soil average PH levels)

These two simple questions will allow me to research the local Agricultural department and to write up the most efficient mix. Your compost can well prepared and nutrient enriched, but if the soil PH is wrong it will have very little effect on the over all production of your crop.


Thanks for the quick reply James, we are not in any hurry we have not yet started building the house, but very soon ;D

The most important things to grow would be all type of salad crops, tomatoes (particularly cherry) lettuce, cucumber, spring onions etc. Would it also be possible to grow beetroot here? Sometime later I would like to experiment with growing some of the flowers I used to grow in the UK such as Dalias, Geraniums etc.

Our lot is just a few kilometers north of the built up area of Puerto Princesa Palawan. If you would like to look here, http://thephilippinejournal.wetpaint.com/page/Our+future+home the map will give you the exact location. An enlarged version of the terrain map looks useful.

I don\'t know what the soil is on our lot, but there is a lot of coral about 1-2 kilometer to the east, and about 2-3 kilometers to the west, just north of the harbour, the soil is very red in colour. We get plenty of rain, and there are a few very tall trees on the lot which suggests a good underground water supply.

Colin

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Re: Organic garden
« Reply #12 on: June 25, 2009, 12:20:49 PM »
\"area soil composition, soil average PH levels\"

There\'s the question I\'ve been asking locally for years now, even an Ag teacher behind us.

Through trail and error, we found some things will grow at one end, but not the other in a 140s/m area.

I wonder if a large OLD jack fruit tree taken down and at the other end banana plants taken out could be a reason? Plus, we are about 1/2 km, (as the crow flys), from the sea.

I have used worm casting that I can buy for potting foreign seeds and then transferring to the soil. We now are chopping dried cow pies for the soil also. But, everything is trail and error and all but given up on foreign seeds from different countries, even the State of FL.
B-Ray Bacong, Oriental Negros

 

Colin,

I will dust off the books and contact some friends in the Aggie departments here.
I only need to know;
a.) what you want to grow? (to insure the proper PH level required)
b.) where do you live? (needed for: annual rain fall amounts, area soil composition, soil average PH levels)

These two simple questions will allow me to research the local Agricultural department and to write up the most efficient mix. Your compost can well prepared and nutrient enriched, but if the soil PH is wrong it will have very little effect on the over all production of your crop.

 


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