Author Topic: For You Electricans  (Read 4665 times)

Offline aerosick

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Re: For You Electricans
« Reply #15 on: October 24, 2009, 10:17:45 AM »

No, we don\'t live near a military base. We live in a new subdivision just developed in 1995 and completed in 2001 in Sta. Rosa, Laguna. The building materials used by the developers was of U.S. standards and there is a pole with a ground, but some of the wiring going into the house have 2 and 3 wires for a 2 or 3 pronged wall outlet. Just a few of my 220v outlet has the jumper wire to convert one of the socket to provide 110v. All I know is, that it works for my 110v microwave oven and rice cooker for the past 10 years! But I did experience a voltage lost when the ground wire on the pole loosened it\'s crimp at the ground splice connection. Just had to re-crimp the ground splice and my 110v was restored!† †

So, are there 2 or 3 wires coming to your house from the pole(s) where the overhead transformer is located? Is your electrical service made up of 2 insulated wires or 2 insulated and 1 bare wire (3 total wires)?

The ground wire loosening is not unusual or for the ground rod to erode and needs to be replaced.

Billy
"We're here to preserve democracy, not practice it."

Gene Hackman: Crimson Tide ~ 1995

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Re: For You Electricans
« Reply #16 on: October 24, 2009, 10:25:36 AM »

No, we don\'t live near a military base. We live in a new subdivision just developed in 1995 and completed in 2001 in Sta. Rosa, Laguna. The building materials used by the developers was of U.S. standards and there is a pole with a ground, but some of the wiring going into the house have 2 and 3 wires for a 2 or 3 pronged wall outlet. Just a few of my 220v outlet has the jumper wire to convert one of the socket to provide 110v. All I know is, that it works for my 110v microwave oven and rice cooker for the past 10 years! But I did experience a voltage lost when the ground wire on the pole loosened it\'s crimp at the ground splice connection. Just had to re-crimp the ground splice and my 110v was restored!† †

So, are there 2 or 3 wires coming to your house from the pole(s) where the overhead transformer is located? Is your electrical service made up of 2 insulated wires or 2 insulated and 1 bare wire (3 total wires)?

The ground wire loosening is not unusual or for the ground rod to erode and needs to be replaced.

Billy
BOTH are used inside the home! But, the transformer is not directly overhead or on our pole. It\'s further away on a main pole Meralco put in.

Offline aerosick

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Re: For You Electricans
« Reply #17 on: October 24, 2009, 10:31:12 AM »
BOTH are used inside the home! But, the transformer is not directly overhead or on our pole. It\'s further away on a main pole Meralco put in.

So there\'s 2 wires coming to your house from the transformer pole and both wires are insulated? If you get a chance to look at the Meralco transformer, see if there are 2 or 3 wires connected to the insulated bushings on the side of the transformer. Also look for a ground wire coming down the pole that\'s connected to the transformer.

Billy
"We're here to preserve democracy, not practice it."

Gene Hackman: Crimson Tide ~ 1995

Offline tennesseevolunteer

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Re: For You Electricans
« Reply #18 on: October 27, 2009, 04:52:11 AM »
Yesterday I sat down with my cousin over a few cold ones. He is an electrician here in USA and did my wiring on my last remod job. I asked him is it possible to take 220 power and use a jumper wire and have 220 in one plug and 110 in the other. He said first thing the only way is to have a ground wire.† I have trusted him with my life and I trust him on his information. For us still waiting on the blue prints, I\'ll wait till I meet with the electrician and see if it is old school for him if not I guess I\'ll use transformers.

Maricel sent me several web sites that sell major appliances. I have found that big TV\'s are much more expensive and the refig\'s are not the type we desire or have but everything else seems to be in the replacable price range.

We still have time to make great decisions.

THANKS FOR THE INFO

Offline aerosick

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Re: For You Electricans
« Reply #19 on: October 27, 2009, 05:11:56 AM »
Yesterday I sat down with my cousin over a few cold ones. He is an electrician here in USA and did my wiring on my last remod job. I asked him is it possible to take 220 power and use a jumper wire and have 220 in one plug and 110 in the other. He said first thing the only way is to have a ground wire.† I have trusted him with my life and I trust him on his information. For us still waiting on the blue prints, I\'ll wait till I meet with the electrician and see if it is old school for him if not I guess I\'ll use transformers.

Maricel sent me several web sites that sell major appliances. I have found that big TV\'s are much more expensive and the refig\'s are not the type we desire or have but everything else seems to be in the replacable price range.

We still have time to make great decisions.

THANKS FOR THE INFO

A guy I know that lives in Cebu took a vacation in Hong Kong where he bought the big appliances and had them shipped there. He was able to find larger appliances and TVs like he wanted to have.

Another option...

Billy

Billy
"We're here to preserve democracy, not practice it."

Gene Hackman: Crimson Tide ~ 1995

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Re: For You Electricans
« Reply #20 on: October 27, 2009, 09:39:56 AM »
Yesterday I sat down with my cousin over a few cold ones. He is an electrician here in USA and did my wiring on my last remod job. I asked him is it possible to take 220 power and use a jumper wire and have 220 in one plug and 110 in the other. He said first thing the only way is to have a ground wire.  I have trusted him with my life and I trust him on his information. For us still waiting on the blue prints, I\'ll wait till I meet with the electrician and see if it is old school for him if not I guess I\'ll use transformers.

Billy


Billy,

All I know is that my 110v socket works that\'s on the same 220v wall outlet.

Check out this website:

http://en.allexperts.com/q/Electric-Power-Utilities-2405/2008/7/splitting-220v-110-v.htm

Hope this answers your question. I\'m not an electrician, but it\'s amazing what you can find on the internet by just asking Google Search a \"HOW TO\" question and it only took me a matter of minutes to find this subject matter.

Art

Offline dylanaz

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Re: For You Electricans
« Reply #21 on: October 27, 2009, 10:30:53 AM »
Some people I ran across just did a test of this and documented it in detail on a tagalog forum I belong to.

Switching to 110v by grounding one side of the 220v outlet resulted in a 50% decrease in monitored consumption of the same electronics per their meter box.

Basically if a device had dual voltage and was using 0.25 kilotwtts per hour at 220v when they converted the outlet to 110v the same device was now reading on the meter a mere 0.13

Sounds to me like something is not as intended here - needless to say - I dont plan to do this. The utility company may hunt you down for accidentally discovering this .. abberration.
I have seen so much conflict while in the Philippines - amazingly 99% of it was merely online computer experiences :D

Offline aerosick

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Re: For You Electricans
« Reply #22 on: October 27, 2009, 11:34:46 AM »

Billy,

All I know is that my 110v socket works that\'s on the same 220v wall outlet.

Check out this website:

http://en.allexperts.com/q/Electric-Power-Utilities-2405/2008/7/splitting-220v-110-v.htm

Hope this answers your question. I\'m not an electrician, but it\'s amazing what you can find on the internet by just asking Google Search a \"HOW TO\" question and it only took me a matter of minutes to find this subject matter.

Art


Art,

Here\'s from the Google Search you Posted:

Quote
This is pretty simple. What you have for 220v is two hot wires, a neutral wire and a ground wire. Now for 110v you will only need one hot wire, one neutral wire and your ground wire.


That\'s true, but where I\'ve been in the Philippines, 2 wires of the above equation are missing in their circuits:

1. Neutral wire

2. Ground wire

What\'s left is 2 hot wires that complete a 220v circuit. If you \"ground\" 1 of these wires to complete your circuit, that \"ground\" has to travel through the earth until it finds another wire \"grounded\" on the same transformer, the same circuit that feeds your transformer or somewhere back towards the generator.

You can probably guess what will happen if 1 of your neighbors decides to \"ground\" 1 of their hot wires, but picks the opposite hot wire that you did. Or if you happen to be that 2nd person applying a \"ground\" on your opposite hot wire. It will be a \"matter of seconds\" to blow things up, including yourself!

Danger, danger!!!

Billy
"We're here to preserve democracy, not practice it."

Gene Hackman: Crimson Tide ~ 1995

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Re: For You Electricans
« Reply #23 on: October 27, 2009, 01:58:15 PM »

Billy,

All I know is that my 110v socket works that\'s on the same 220v wall outlet.

Check out this website:

http://en.allexperts.com/q/Electric-Power-Utilities-2405/2008/7/splitting-220v-110-v.htm

Hope this answers your question. I\'m not an electrician, but it\'s amazing what you can find on the internet by just asking Google Search a \"HOW TO\" question and it only took me a matter of minutes to find this subject matter.

Art


Art,

Here\'s from the Google Search you Posted:

Quote
This is pretty simple. What you have for 220v is two hot wires, a neutral wire and a ground wire. Now for 110v you will only need one hot wire, one neutral wire and your ground wire.


That\'s true, but where I\'ve been in the Philippines, 2 wires of the above equation are missing in their circuits:

1. Neutral wire

2. Ground wire

What\'s left is 2 hot wires that complete a 220v circuit. If you \"ground\" 1 of these wires to complete your circuit, that \"ground\" has to travel through the earth until it finds another wire \"grounded\" on the same transformer, the same circuit that feeds your transformer or somewhere back towards the generator.

You can probably guess what will happen if 1 of your neighbors decides to \"ground\" 1 of their hot wires, but picks the opposite hot wire that you did. Or if you happen to be that 2nd person applying a \"ground\" on your opposite hot wire. It will be a \"matter of seconds\" to blow things up, including yourself!

Danger, danger!!!

Billy


It isn\'t my theory, that\'s not the only website that has the subject on 220v to 110v conversion. If it\'s not safe, why do they publish it on the internet? Anyway, I\'m the only one using a 110v outlet blocks away from any other homes here in our subdivision. I have been using my 110v outlet for 10 years now! My contractor\'s electrician was the one who converted a few of my 220v outlet with a 110v outlet, hasn\'t fried anything yet like my 10 yr old †Panasonic microwave oven, which is the only highest wattage that\'s putting out! No reason to fix anything that ain\'t broke! Anyways, I have fire insurance for our home and a good U.S. Standard type main circuit breaker panel!

Art † †