Author Topic: electricity in the Philippines  (Read 39699 times)

Offline David690

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Re: electricity in the Philippines
« Reply #135 on: July 13, 2016, 03:24:09 AM »
Well apparently some of us home owners here have a different voltage supply set up. I can only speak for myself and what i have here in our home in North Luzon. We have the two wire system and 220 VAC. only. This consist of one bare wire and one insulated wire coming from the pole. The bare wire is also grounded at the pole on the street. We have no option to lower the voltage except by utilising a step down transformer. That is if we want to use 110 VAC in side our home to power 110 VAC appliances.
We have to work with what what the utility company supply.
What i did was added one extra ground wire by inserting a six foot grounded rod into the earth. Actually two six foot ground rods.
This grounded wire was added to a ground buss inside the main breaker box. I used all three pin outlets and the whole house is wired with the extra ground wire. With this set up i could use ground faults GFI. inside the kitchen and bathrooms.
Also no more tingling (mini shocks) when i touch the refrigerator or the range if i am barefooted, which is how i walk inside the house. Everyone else use fit flop inside the house.
When we were building the house the roofers who did the steel trusts complained about the welder not working because of the low supply voltage, voltage was from 180 to 200 VAC. So we purchased our own transformer from Novelco which they installed on the pole and we got a steady supply of 230VAC. Over here in the province one transformer supply many homes, resulting in a voltage drop.

Hi Trevor

That is the same set up as I am planning for my house.  Thought it was clear until I read the post from Doctor M.  I can only assume that there are some old wiring system around in some areas, that were maybe set up in order to be able to arrange for 110v supply into the house.  That is not my intention at all.  I am looking to install a system that for all intents and purposes complies with the 17th Edition of the UK Regulations.  That is with a neutral connected as the return conductor and grounded in the mains panel which is fitted with single pole MCB's, (i.e. switching only the live/hot & no switching of the neutral), RCD's and no ELCB's.
Londoner at heart

Offline trevor

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Re: electricity in the Philippines
« Reply #136 on: July 13, 2016, 04:24:14 PM »
David.. I understand what you are looking for. The three wire set up, two hot and one neutral. The two hot supply 220VAC. One hot and the neutral supply 110VAC. I understand that in Baguio and Subic Bay where the U.S. military bases were, there is the three wire set up. Not sure of any place else on Luzon.
I would think it is possible to get what you want but that may be very costly and a big hassle. All appliances here use 220 VAC.  So i just went along with the flow. Here in the province everything is just lax.
One example is we wanted to install a door bell or a gate bell with the press button outside our gate. The ones i could buy here all use 220 VAC. No way i would install a 220 volt push button outside my gate or front door. Sooner or later with use and from personal experiences i know the Push button will deteriorate and fall apart most likely exposing bare wires. Someone press that on a rainy day and standing in a wet fit flop and you know what will happen.
I imported a nice chime from the U.S. along with a 18 volts supply transformer. The primary voltage for the transformer was 110 volts. So i used a 110 volts output step down transformer. 220 to 110. So now i could install my 18 volts house chime. Quite legal and safe. Some day i will try and read up on the electrical code here, if there is one available.
Well good luck with your project and feel free to contact me if you think i can help in anyway. Cheers.
Never look down on anyone and always extend a helping hand. Tomorrow the role may be reverse.
Life is what you make it. Nothing to do with luck.

Offline David690

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Re: electricity in the Philippines
« Reply #137 on: July 13, 2016, 05:08:10 PM »
David.. I understand what you are looking for. The three wire set up, two hot and one neutral. The two hot supply 220VAC. One hot and the neutral supply 110VAC. I understand that in Baguio and Subic Bay where the U.S. military bases were, there is the three wire set up. Not sure of any place else on Luzon.
I would think it is possible to get what you want but that may be very costly and a big hassle. All appliances here use 220 VAC.  So i just went along with the flow. Here in the province everything is just lax.
One example is we wanted to install a door bell or a gate bell with the press button outside our gate. The ones i could buy here all use 220 VAC. No way i would install a 220 volt push button outside my gate or front door. Sooner or later with use and from personal experiences i know the Push button will deteriorate and fall apart most likely exposing bare wires. Someone press that on a rainy day and standing in a wet fit flop and you know what will happen.
I imported a nice chime from the U.S. along with a 18 volts supply transformer. The primary voltage for the transformer was 110 volts. So i used a 110 volts output step down transformer. 220 to 110. So now i could install my 18 volts house chime. Quite legal and safe. Some day i will try and read up on the electrical code here, if there is one available.
Well good luck with your project and feel free to contact me if you think i can help in anyway. Cheers.

Hi Trevor, sorry I confused you.  I am not looking for that at all, I am installing a 2 wire 220v system, i.e. Live plus Neutral, same as yours.
Londoner at heart

Offline harry80020

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Re: electricity in the Philippines
« Reply #138 on: September 10, 2018, 07:15:42 AM »
Yes, you can use double pole breakers & switches, so long as the switch or breaker dis-connects both the hot wire and the neutral at the same time, although it wouldn't be necessary on a properly installed system.  As your code reference attachment states you would never want to install a 3-way or 4-way switch in the neutral or grounded conductor, they are actually both single pole switches.  The ground/green wire is not a current carrying conductor, except in the event of a fault, and should never be switched.  One attachments didn't make much sense and I couldn't open 2 attachments.   

On Sunday, September 9, 2018, 2:11:54 AM MDT, peter bates <phugobates@gmail.com> wrote:


Hello Harry.
As a UK expat and retired to Leyte I found your article understandable and very much in line with the electricity (brown out periods not withstanding!!!) here in Leyte. Our house wiring includes the GREEN EARTH and 3 hole socket outlets (NOT switched) but the KOTEN Distribution Board (see attachment) comprises Double Pole Circuit Breakers for each circuit. With the installation electrician being local, I doubt if he was bought up on the AMERICAN style two hot 120V HOT WIRES =240v

1. In UK terms, the Philippines earthing is equivalent to our TT system (see earthing.pdf). Do you agree?
2. PEC/NEC (multipole switches1.png) 14.4.1.2(b) indicates multipole circuit breakers/switches are allowed. Would you consider the GREEN EARTH to be a circuit conductor?
3. There is a view in UK that DP Isolators should be fitted to fixed appliances (? airconn units).

You article advises "...There should NEVER be a fuse or breaker in the neutral white GROUNDED wire..." Are you really saying NEVER, even if the circuit breaker is connected to the HOT wire also?

Thank you.

Peter Bates


    multipole switches1.png
    763.7kB
    2 pole breaker opinions.png
    1.6MB
    KOTEN DISTRIB BOARD.png
    3.4MB
    Electricity | Electricity in the Philippines.webarchive
    2.5MB
    earthing.pdf
    428.5kB

 


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