Author Topic: Steps to building a house  (Read 3603 times)

Offline Murphy

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Steps to building a house
« on: April 12, 2012, 09:56:43 PM »
Hello

My wife and I own beach property in Palawan that we intend to build on.
We are wondering the best way to accomplish this....as a starting point.

Is it best to build a small hut built...so to speak ... to stay in...then build the house?...I dont want to rent all that time the house is being built.
Seems getting there...having a place to stay...while building is the issue. We plan to build on the property...improve the place...even if its just an investment. My wife can keep it....and live there....or sell it for a profit later...after Im gone.

Seems like the egg-chicken issue.

Murph

Offline wfox11

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Re: Steps to building a house
« Reply #1 on: April 12, 2012, 10:46:16 PM »
We plan to build a small house to stay in while our big house is being built. Later it will serve as the guest house.

Ronald Reagan said \"sometimes our right hand doesn\'t know what our far-right hand is doing.\"

Offline Gray Wolf

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Re: Steps to building a house
« Reply #2 on: April 12, 2012, 11:11:40 PM »
We have similar plans when we build next year.  I intend to build small 2-room house that will either become a guest house, maid\'s quarters or my hobby room.  I figured it would be best to live on-site to help prevent theft of my building materials.
Louisville, KY USA

Offline Murphy

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Re: Steps to building a house
« Reply #3 on: April 13, 2012, 09:37:10 PM »
Exactly....my wife mentioned turning the first build(hut)...into a guest house.
Then she laughed and said...who knows we may like the natural hut and stay in it. Only issue with this idea...is it wont be built in the correct spot on the property....off to the side or back. I thought about building a natural hut just to improve the property for selling anyway...so not a loss either way.

Our plans are to live on the land as of right now...depending on my health :-\\...
We are kind of waiting for our neighbors to build also....beach property in Palawan...5 strips of land...one American owner..not sure of the rest.
Ill have to keep up with your posts and see how it goes for you guys....and try to learn.

Murph


Offline rdjlazo@yahoo.com

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Re: Steps to building a house
« Reply #4 on: April 14, 2012, 07:34:36 AM »
Brilliant idea building a small house for construction use then
build the mansion or a bit smaller and I might be your tenant.
Build the first one with stronger material so it can last longer.
Can be rental if not a guest house.
Advantage of being there is you can see all the materials you are
buying and being delivered are there and staying there until they are  used.
Workers and all will know they are being watched so they will not be tempted
to be lazy. Best is being there while u are building so you can correct the
errors before it get worst.
Saves you a lot of money and hurt aches and head aches.
Just my thoughs,
Good luck,
Rudy

Offline Giorgio

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Re: Steps to building a house
« Reply #5 on: April 15, 2012, 09:00:35 AM »
I enjoy reading these posts.....especially with the guys who have the experiences already. We just bought some land last month in Davao City, and were planning to build a nice house 1st, while still renting.

But now, I can see the advantages of building a smaller house 1st....staying there and watching carefully the building of our future main house.

We can always use the smaller house for guests, rentals, maids, or even small business or workshop.

I guess a 2 bedroom, 1 bath would be a good start for just the 2 of us.

Offline suzukig1

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Re: Steps to building a house
« Reply #6 on: April 15, 2012, 10:17:49 AM »
I haven\'t seen anyone who has actually built a house here post that building a small house first is a good idea.

1) What do you build before the small house so that you can watch over the building of the small house?  Building a house here takes a lot longer than you plan.  At least 1 year should be allowed.  Longer if you are building in a remote location where you have to have building materials shipped in (floor tiles, roofing materials, etc.)  (Unless you are planning on building a simple concrete block, dirt floor house.)  So if you build a small house to live in first, it better be comfortable enough to live in for a year or longer.

2) If you have a guest house you are almost guaranteeing that you will eventually have \"guests\".  What are you going to do if/when one of your wife\'s cousins is homeless after a typhoon or flood and asks to stay in your guest house for a few weeks.  How are you going to kick them out after a few weeks turns into a few months (and then a few years if you don\'t do anything).

I agree that watching over the building process is very important and you need to figure out a way to do that.  But IMO, building a guest house is a waste of money that could be used to make the main house even better.

Offline Murphy

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Re: Steps to building a house
« Reply #7 on: April 16, 2012, 12:21:55 AM »
Hi Suzuki

These are just ideas...maybe it is a new approach to building a house.

But for this discussion and to help me figure it out.

1.  Have you built a house there?

2. How did you do it?

Thanks
Murphy

Offline Gray Wolf

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Re: Steps to building a house
« Reply #8 on: April 16, 2012, 06:57:39 AM »
There\'s no need to build a western style, fully modern house just to stay in while the main house is bing built.  The small house could be a nipa hut for all I care.  That takes one day to build.  Two days if it\'s a big nipa hut.  When the big house is finished, I can have a bonfire if I want. 

Louisville, KY USA

Offline BingColin

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Re: Steps to building a house
« Reply #9 on: April 16, 2012, 07:03:24 AM »
When we built our house we did not build any temporary accommodation first, I wish now that we had, it would have saved us a lot of money; we had a lot of cement and rebar stolen. We eventually had to employ full time guards, and they told us that they were asked by several people if they could speak to the foreman because he sold cement ‘cheaper than anywhere else’.

Our neighbour opposite built a nice nippa hut first for P50k. It had a ‘studio’ room plus bathroom and kitchen. They kept on one of the workers as a full time helper, and he lives there now. The maid has separate accommodation. Their bungalow is open plan, so they use the kitchen in the hut to cook smelly fish.

We have friends that work in China and took five years to build their house. They first built a very nice garden house and lived there when they were in the Philippines. It is two stories, the first floor of block and was a kitchen and toilet. This has now been opened out to form a sitting area with BBQ next to their pool. The second floor is wood and is a bedroom, now used for guests. The wife, a Filipina, prefers to cook on the outdoor gas BBQ rather than the induction hob and microwave they have in their indoor open plan kitchen.

Offline Giorgio

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Re: Steps to building a house
« Reply #10 on: April 16, 2012, 08:22:58 AM »
These last few posts support my thoughts about building something smaller 1st......the most important is to keep watch over the building materials and the quality of the workmanship. All relatives live on other islands....NO chance of visits...heheheeee....

Offline suzukig1

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Re: Steps to building a house
« Reply #11 on: April 16, 2012, 11:17:57 AM »
Hi Suzuki

These are just ideas...maybe it is a new approach to building a house.

But for this discussion and to help me figure it out.

1.  Have you built a house there?

2. How did you do it?

Thanks
Murphy

Sorry.  I didn\'t mean to sound offensive.  I was just giving an alternative opinion. 

I did say that it was important to watch over things.  So I guess if you don\'t have someone that can do that, then maybe you will have to live there while the house is being built.

My main thought was that most Westerners would not be comfortable living in a quickly built house without the \"usual amenities\".  Possibly for up to a year.  I could not live in a place that didn\'t have aircon, a Western style CR and cable/satellite TV. 

About \"guests\" coming to live with you.  My wife and I currently live in a 4 bedroom, 200 sq. m house.  All rooms are filled now.  My brother-in-law and his wife and daughter occupy one room.  For the other bedrooms; one is a boys room and the other is a girls room.  An aunt and her son and daughter were flooded out of their house a couple of years ago and they live with us now.  Another of my wife\'s cousins has two sons that she can\'t feed \"healthy\" food all of the time.  So they stay with us during the school year.  I don\'t mind this because there\'s a need and we can afford to take care of them.

My wife owns 3 houses now.  One was already built when we bought it.  Friends live in that house.  The second one was built from scratch.  Our current house.  The third one was built by a developer in a gated community.  We will move there at the end of April and live in two houses.  My wife runs an agriculture business (farming, processing corn and farm loans) near the current house.  The new house is about 45 minutes away.

How did we handle the house that was built from scratch?  My bother-in-law watched over things while he was living on the property in a \"guest house\".   :D  Actually it was a one room, concrete block house on the property that my father-in-law lived in.  Dirt floors and no cr.  It was torn down after one room in the new house was in liveable condition.

BTW, if possible, I would recommend that you try and find houses in your area that you like and try to find out who built it.  The person that built our house also built the mayor\'s house in our town.

Offline Gray Wolf

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Re: Steps to building a house
« Reply #12 on: April 16, 2012, 09:34:42 PM »
Another option that my wife brought up this weekend would be to rent a place to live that\'s close to your building site.  That way you could visit as often as you like/need.  If you don\'t live on site, a night watch crew would be a must.  And make sure they are honest.  Get references.
Louisville, KY USA

Offline Murphy

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Re: Steps to building a house
« Reply #13 on: April 17, 2012, 03:18:53 AM »
Thanks Suzuki.....Im open to ideas...some that have worked....some that didnt....just gathering info. I repsect the words of guys who have gone before me. Now I see why you mentioned the relatives...wow...you got your hands full!

Gray Wolf....I hope you post what you end up doing....Im not so keen on renting and paying for security also.....either way maybe youll post \"Your Build\"...so to speak and have a build thread.
It would really be interesting seeing the nipa hut you start with...if you go that route.

My wifes parents have two houses on a small lot.
One is a natural nipa hut...
One is a concrete walled home...
I sure like the natural house better....just seemed more comfortable...and actually looked better also...minus the AC that is..but I like warm weather.


Offline Metz

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Re: Steps to building a house
« Reply #14 on: April 17, 2012, 06:49:31 AM »
We just added on to the house here in Antipolo.

Took 2 weeks from start to enclosure with 6 workers. 

Concrete construction, concrete roof as it is the deck for the second floor balcony. 

We had ready-mix concrete delivered 6 cubic meters. 

Never had any problems with theft as we used the Mormon boys here.  They worked quite fast with the couple extra power tools I supplied.  I had a metal chop saw for the rebar, air chisel to chip concrete from the house to expose the existing rebar to tie into, jig saw for some hole cutting and that was about it. 

I bought a new Makita circular saw, but they were afraid of breaking it so they stuck with the hand saw.

We ran 8ga 3 wire electrical, each outlet has a separate 30 amp breaker.  The lights are wired so as to be converted to solar in the future.

The last week they have been catching up on the house honey-do\'s here.  Shelve in the bedrooms, sidewalks, painting, caulking, etc.  We got the water purification system installed although it leaks cause one filter i bought overseas is defective. 

This week is painting, finishing the wifes dental clinic, setting up the aquaponics system, making sales calls for the shop and other related busy work.

 


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