Author Topic: Passive Cooling  (Read 10910 times)

Offline paulgee

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Re: Passive Cooling
« Reply #15 on: May 23, 2013, 09:30:20 PM »
Our house is a standard sub division property - hollow blocks and no roof insulation.

We can do nothing about the walls but if we stay there long term in future we will get some roof insulation.

During the 3 months we were there last year we used aircon but as frugally as possible and I think the cost would be manageable, especially as we have split aircon which is cheaper to use though more expensive to buy. And the Sep-Dec time we spent there was not the hottest time of the year, so that would have to be taken into account.

Paul
Based in the UK, and part time in our San Fernando, Pampanga house

Offline rayhigh

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Re: Passive Cooling
« Reply #16 on: May 15, 2014, 09:21:07 PM »

Hello Colin,

I'm new here.  What is the address of your website?

Thanks!

I have been away for a few days visiting El Nido so have not been able to respond until now.

I think it important to insulate walls even if you are not planning to use much aircon. Take a look at this section of my web site. http://thephilippinejournal.wetpaint.com/page/Design  We use very little aircon and the house is noticeably cooler most of the time even with the windows open. A hollow block wall has an R value of around 1.0 and my 3 inch polystyrene walls around 11.0. That is 11 times better; they are cold even if the sun is on them all day. If you want to use aircon then you will have a big reduction in electricity bills. We only have fans in the lounge and master bedroom, but I do use a small aircon more often in my study. There are other aspects of house design that you need to consider to make it comfortable, and I cover them on my web site.

Whatever you do with the walls, it is essential to insulate the attic space and give lots of ventilation. We used 6 inch foil bags filled with fibreglass from Citi Hardware, but they then stopped stocking it at our local store. You should be able to buy the rolls of fibreglass at building supply stores.

Offline BingColin

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Re: Passive Cooling
« Reply #17 on: May 15, 2014, 09:38:52 PM »

Hello Colin,

I'm new here.  What is the address of your website?

Thanks!

I have been away for a few days visiting El Nido so have not been able to respond until now.

I think it important to insulate walls even if you are not planning to use much aircon. Take a look at this section of my web site. http://thephilippinejournal.wetpaint.com/page/Design  We use very little aircon and the house is noticeably cooler most of the time even with the windows open. A hollow block wall has an R value of around 1.0 and my 3 inch polystyrene walls around 11.0. That is 11 times better; they are cold even if the sun is on them all day. If you want to use aircon then you will have a big reduction in electricity bills. We only have fans in the lounge and master bedroom, but I do use a small aircon more often in my study. There are other aspects of house design that you need to consider to make it comfortable, and I cover them on my web site.

Whatever you do with the walls, it is essential to insulate the attic space and give lots of ventilation. We used 6 inch foil bags filled with fibreglass from Citi Hardware, but they then stopped stocking it at our local store. You should be able to buy the rolls of fibreglass at building supply stores.



Hi Ray, my website used to be with 'wetpaint' but they seem to have changed hands and it is now http://thephilippinejournal.wikifoundry.com/.

We have now installed aircon in our bedroom and have it set to 26C. Our electricity bill does not seem to be any higher than when we used a fan, and as long as you keep the doors closed it remains cooler for most of the day.

Offline rayhigh

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Re: Passive Cooling
« Reply #18 on: May 15, 2014, 09:46:22 PM »

Colin,

Thanks so much for the updated link.  We are determined to build our place to keep as cool as possible - I really want to avoid $300/month electricity bills!

Best,

R


Hello Colin,

I'm new here.  What is the address of your website?

Thanks!

I have been away for a few days visiting El Nido so have not been able to respond until now.

I think it important to insulate walls even if you are not planning to use much aircon. Take a look at this section of my web site. http://thephilippinejournal.wetpaint.com/page/Design  We use very little aircon and the house is noticeably cooler most of the time even with the windows open. A hollow block wall has an R value of around 1.0 and my 3 inch polystyrene walls around 11.0. That is 11 times better; they are cold even if the sun is on them all day. If you want to use aircon then you will have a big reduction in electricity bills. We only have fans in the lounge and master bedroom, but I do use a small aircon more often in my study. There are other aspects of house design that you need to consider to make it comfortable, and I cover them on my web site.

Whatever you do with the walls, it is essential to insulate the attic space and give lots of ventilation. We used 6 inch foil bags filled with fibreglass from Citi Hardware, but they then stopped stocking it at our local store. You should be able to buy the rolls of fibreglass at building supply stores.



Hi Ray, my website used to be with 'wetpaint' but they seem to have changed hands and it is now http://thephilippinejournal.wikifoundry.com/.

We have now installed aircon in our bedroom and have it set to 26C. Our electricity bill does not seem to be any higher than when we used a fan, and as long as you keep the doors closed it remains cooler for most of the day.

Offline BingColin

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Re: Passive Cooling
« Reply #19 on: May 16, 2014, 08:04:04 AM »

Colin,

Thanks so much for the updated link.  We are determined to build our place to keep as cool as possible - I really want to avoid $300/month electricity bills!

Best,

R


Hi Ray, I would recommend that you consider 'Inverter' aircons, they are cheaper to run. I think they are only made in the split type which are a lot quieter that the window/wall type anyway. We favour the Samsung aircons, and other things, they are very good and less expensive than some other brands.

We have a 2hp split type inverter in the kitchen a 2.5hp in the bedroom. They are use quite a lot together with  0.5 window type in my study. I am planning to replace that with a 1hp interter soon. The other bedrooms have 0.5hp window/wall types but they are rarely used.

Our total electricity is usually around P7000

Offline medic3500

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Re: Passive Cooling
« Reply #20 on: May 16, 2014, 11:09:43 AM »
Yikes, your electric bill alone is more than my rent and all utilities. I guess I'm a cheap ass.

Offline Lee2

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Re: Passive Cooling
« Reply #21 on: May 16, 2014, 09:21:36 PM »
I wish I had bought inverter units when we bought our two carrier units years ago but I do not think they were available back then. When they go, I hope no time soon, as they are expensive to buy new ones, then they will be probably replaced with inverter units.

Our units are split units, if I had it to do again then I might have bought window units as the noise helps cover outside noises and even I can work on window units to pull them out and clean them myself.
:) Happily married since 1994 & live part of the year in Cebu and the rest in S. Florida.

Offline paulgee

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Re: Passive Cooling
« Reply #22 on: May 17, 2014, 02:39:36 AM »
Our house is a standard sub division property - hollow blocks and no roof insulation.

We can do nothing about the walls but if we stay there long term in future we will get some roof insulation.

During the 3 months we were there last year we used aircon but as frugally as possible and I think the cost would be manageable, especially as we have split aircon which is cheaper to use though more expensive to buy. And the Sep-Dec time we spent there was not the hottest time of the year, so that would have to be taken into account.

Paul

Yes, the aircon I referred to above are actually inverter types, Panasonic. Well worth the extra outlay, and cost us nothing to run whilst we live in the UK ! But obviously the maintenance is more than the standard aircon units.
Based in the UK, and part time in our San Fernando, Pampanga house

Offline Gray Wolf

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Re: Passive Cooling
« Reply #23 on: May 17, 2014, 03:54:01 AM »
I had to do a little research to find out what exactly an inverter type A/C is.  For those who, like myself, didn't know, here's the info:

"An inverter in an air conditioner is used to control the speed of the compressor motor to drive variable refrigerant flow in an air conditioning system to regulate the conditioned-space temperature. By contrast, traditional air conditioners regulate temperature by using a compressor that is periodically either working at maximum capacity or switched off entirely. Inverter-equipped air conditioners have a variable-frequency drive that incorporates an adjustable electrical inverter to control the speed of the motor and thus the compressor and cooling output.

The variable-frequency drive uses a rectifier to convert the incoming alternating current (AC) to direct current (DC) and then uses pulse-width modulation in an electrical inverter to produce AC of a desired frequency. The variable frequency AC drives a brushless motor or an induction motor. As the speed of an induction motor is proportional to the frequency of the AC, the compressor can now run at different speeds.[citation needed] A microcontroller can then sample the current ambient air temperature and adjust the speed of the compressor appropriately. The additional electronics and system hardware adds cost to the equipment installation but can result in substantial savings in operating costs.

Eliminating stop-start cycles increases efficiency"


Sounds like a good system!  :)
Louisville, KY USA

Offline BingColin

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Re: Passive Cooling
« Reply #24 on: May 17, 2014, 10:26:31 AM »
Our large Samsung side-by-side fridge freezer is also an inverter type which should also help reduce electricity costs.

Dan, our neighbour opposite has a bungalow the same volume as our house and his electricity bill is only P2000. He has a large open plan living area that we found uncomfortably hot.

Offline wildbill

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Re: Passive Cooling
« Reply #25 on: May 17, 2014, 11:01:13 AM »
Yikes, your electric bill alone is more than my rent and all utilities. I guess I'm a cheap ass.
Medic your no cheap ass,I also don't like high Bills ,we run one window unit during the niter then during the heat of the day,our bill runs about 2,to 3 thousand a month,..to each his own,but I'm not wasting the money.we must save for those Rainy days.

Offline brett4gam

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Re: Passive Cooling
« Reply #26 on: May 17, 2014, 01:04:04 PM »
Hi Colin, I tried to use the quote button to make my post from your comment but for some reason it took the quote from rayhigh as well, so I did a copy and paste.

"Hi Ray, I would recommend that you consider 'Inverter' aircons, they are cheaper to run. I think they are only made in the split type which are a lot quieter that the window/wall type anyway. We favour the Samsung aircons, and other things, they are very good and less expensive than some other brands."

I agree the inverter is the only way to go, we have just purchased an LG 2.5 hp  split inverter system for the place we are renting here and will take it to the new house when we get it sorted out.  The opressive heat during the day and night got too much for us.

As part of research, I also wasn't aware of the window type air con that were an inverter type until I saw the ad from SM Appliances.  Mind you when I saw the price it was out of the question, can get a split type cheaper than what they advertised.

Thanks also to GW for doing the research and explaining the difference  :D

Cheers
Brett.
I have never seen the world brighter and less prosperous.

Offline BingColin

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Re: Passive Cooling
« Reply #27 on: May 17, 2014, 01:49:19 PM »
Hi Colin, I tried to use the quote button to make my post from your comment but for some reason it took the quote from rayhigh as well, so I did a copy and paste.

"Hi Ray, I would recommend that you consider 'Inverter' aircons, they are cheaper to run. I think they are only made in the split type which are a lot quieter that the window/wall type anyway. We favour the Samsung aircons, and other things, they are very good and less expensive than some other brands."

I agree the inverter is the only way to go, we have just purchased an LG 2.5 hp  split inverter system for the place we are renting here and will take it to the new house when we get it sorted out.  The opressive heat during the day and night got too much for us.

As part of research, I also wasn't aware of the window type air con that were an inverter type until I saw the ad from SM Appliances.  Mind you when I saw the price it was out of the question, can get a split type cheaper than what they advertised.

Thanks also to GW for doing the research and explaining the difference  :D

Cheers
Brett.

I wasn't aware of a window type inverter either, but the split type are so much quieter with the compressor outside the house.

Offline Gray Wolf

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Re: Passive Cooling
« Reply #28 on: May 19, 2014, 01:26:56 AM »
Hi Colin, I tried to use the quote button to make my post from your comment but for some reason it took the quote from rayhigh as well, so I did a copy and paste.

Thanks also to GW for doing the research and explaining the difference  :D

Cheers
Brett.


Brett and all,

This might help explain how to use the quote function:

http://www.livinginthephilippines.com/forum/index.php?topic=49082.new#new

You are quite welcome!   :)
Louisville, KY USA

Offline arlie

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Re: Passive Cooling
« Reply #29 on: May 19, 2014, 05:30:20 AM »
Brett or any one else who knows the answer and would like to tell me.  My understanding of the split type air con is that the compressor is located in a different place from the evaporator and the two are connected by copper tubing carrying refrigerant.  At least here in the states after those two are connected the system which was shipped separate must be vacuum pumped and refilled with refrigerant.  How can they be moved from place to place in the Philippines with out a technician with the right equipment to hook them back up? I ask because I would like to purchase a split unit for our house there but don't know where to find a technician.      Thanks for any help.   Arlie

 


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