Author Topic: Restoring the churches and historical buildings in Bohol  (Read 3541 times)

Offline JoeLP

  • Global Moderator
  • Sr Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 1,697
Restoring the churches and historical buildings in Bohol
« on: October 29, 2013, 06:18:31 PM »
First, let me set this up. 

Right now I am going through having a house built for me in Catarman.  The foundation as done.  The "columns and beams" were next done.  Now the blocking is happening.  Having worked construction throughout my youth as free labor at first, then later "cheap labor" for my dad's company.  The only time we used blocks was sometimes when that is what the buyer wanted for the foundation, be it crawlspace or basement, as opposed to poured cement walls.  I saw the masons using rebar and remember asking them once what the purpose was(because they were filling the blocks with cement also).  They said it kept the blocks better inline and gave them added support and strength. 
Fast forward to the building now in Catarman.  I was watching the guys work and doing the same thing with the rebar.   Thinking it was for the same purpose I said nothing, but it was my Tina that asked what the purpose was.  They responded it makes the walls more "quake proof".  That caught me off guard, but made perfect sense. 
Now I've read about the historic buildings and churches in bohol that collapsed or were damaged.  It hit me that they were not reinforced the same way most likely.  That being the case, is there any way they can add rebar when restoring those buildings?  Or is that too much of a task?  Seems like they'd try at least and find a way to better strengthen the buildings that were damaged.
« Last Edit: October 30, 2013, 06:04:46 PM by JoeLP »
In the land of the blind, the one eyed man is king.

Offline BingColin

  • Sr Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 731
Re: Restoring the churches and historical buildings in Bohol
« Reply #1 on: October 29, 2013, 09:06:46 PM »
While adding rebar to a hollow block wall will make it more quake proof, that is because they are stronger. Rebar in hollow block walls is the standard form of construction here, even for garden walls. We don't get earthquakes here on Palawan but I don't see them leaving out the rebar.

Most older churches around the world are built of stone, but the newer ones I have seen here seem to be the standard hollow block construction and I imagine they have rebar in them.

Offline JoeLP

  • Global Moderator
  • Sr Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 1,697
Re: Restoring the churches and historical buildings in Bohol
« Reply #2 on: October 29, 2013, 10:56:51 PM »
While adding rebar to a hollow block wall will make it more quake proof, that is because they are stronger. Rebar in hollow block walls is the standard form of construction here, even for garden walls. We don't get earthquakes here on Palawan but I don't see them leaving out the rebar.

Most older churches around the world are built of stone, but the newer ones I have seen here seem to be the standard hollow block construction and I imagine they have rebar in them.

That's what I'm talking about.  When they try to restore the historic churches and buildings, will they try and work in some rebar?  I sorta figured that any new buildings would have the rebar after the builder here gave me the reasoning. 
In the land of the blind, the one eyed man is king.

Offline coleman2347

  • ole jarhead, Tacloban City, Leyte
  • Sr Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 1,160
  • Retired Marine, Retired DOD
Re: Restoring the churches and historical buildings in Bohol
« Reply #3 on: October 30, 2013, 07:31:46 AM »
Is I understand it, most of the old historically significant churches involved were made out of limestone blocks.  The Spanish used Filipino slave labor to accomplish this. I would suppose the mortar was a mixture of the same but could not swear to that...personally I am amazed they lasted as long as they did....
The only thing worse than wanting to do it is not doing it

Offline suzukig1

  • Sr Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 684
Re: Restoring the churches and historical buildings in Bohol
« Reply #4 on: October 30, 2013, 01:24:05 PM »
I doubt that they will be able to restore most of those churches to be used as churches again due to cost.

I read that they might consider restoring them to the point where they can be used as tourist attractions.

Offline shortman

  • Sr Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 212
  • This account is now being used by his widow
Re: Restoring the churches and historical buildings in Bohol
« Reply #5 on: October 30, 2013, 03:33:36 PM »
I agree, They should build more modern structures that have a better chance at enduring a calamity such as quakes or violent storms; It may sound corny but it would not hurt to do drills to leave the structure  when dismissing ( at least once a month). i would guess that lots of people are hurt or killed by the panic of the others.....just my humble opinion. :-\
Effective November 2014 this account is now being used by Lar, Shortman's widow.

Offline John Edwards

  • Sr Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 184
Re: Restoring the churches and historical buildings in Bohol
« Reply #6 on: October 30, 2013, 11:13:06 PM »
I agree Shortman. My girlfriend lives in Toledo City, just across the island from Cebu City. She said that there were two people killed in her town, not from the quake or from falling buildings. They were killed by being trampled by everyone running out of the building they were in. It was an old woman and a 4 year old child. I have never experienced an earthquake so I am not an expert on how to handle one, but how long would it take an adult to slow down and scoop up a child and then keep going, as opposed to just running it over and stomping across it as you run. I am having a hard time understand how people can do that.

Offline JoeLP

  • Global Moderator
  • Sr Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 1,697
Re: Restoring the churches and historical buildings in Bohol
« Reply #7 on: October 30, 2013, 11:17:38 PM »
Masses cause problems.  My home city of Grand Rapids, MI made all the late night talk shows about 10 years ago.  On the morning of black friday the mass outside of Walmart trampled 3 people.  A handicapped man, an old woman, and a real REAL big woman.  2 needed to go to a hospital if I remember correctly.  The security cam footage of it somehow got out and was on both of Leno and Letterman.  I can understand, that if masses are willing to trample for a good purchase, they'll be even more likely to trample for an earthquake.  Like you, I don't understand the reasoning, but it doesn't surprise me.  Sad as it is.
In the land of the blind, the one eyed man is king.

Offline Gray Wolf

  • Sr Member +
  • Sr Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 5,152
Re: Restoring the churches and historical buildings in Bohol
« Reply #8 on: October 31, 2013, 02:06:07 AM »
This can be reconstructed...



But it will be much harder to recreate anything near this quality interior...





Considering this is what they have to work from...



Loss of life was lower than it could have been had the quake struck beneath a large city.  But the loss of history, art and culture is immeasurable in my mind.  They can build a new church able to withstand earthquakes, but will they compare in beauty to the centuries old handmade examples lost in the quakes? 

Here's an opportunity for a few skilled workers and artisans to step up and create a new piece of Pinoy culture that will endure for many years.   

Louisville, KY USA

Offline fred

  • Sr Member +
  • Sr Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 919
Re: Restoring the churches and historical buildings in Bohol
« Reply #9 on: November 01, 2013, 08:02:39 AM »
Is I understand it, most of the old historically significant churches involved were made out of limestone blocks.  The Spanish used Filipino slave labor to accomplish this. I would suppose the mortar was a mixture of the same but could not swear to that...personally I am amazed they lasted as long as they did....

No..Not blocks,just large and small Anopog (lime) boulders and coral stone  piled up and stuck together with lime cement.. The outside was clad with harder pre cut lime tiles that are around an inch thick on average..
The compressive strength was good but the Spanish certainly did not build them with earth quakes in mind.. Im surprised they survived the 1990 tremor (6.2)..
The latest 7.2 simply shook them apart..
I would imagine there are Engineers here now designing a rebar reinforced concrete configuration to build the exact same shapes that will be clad with the same or similar Limestone tiles.
« Last Edit: November 01, 2013, 08:04:10 AM by fred »

Offline Frosty

  • Sr Member +
  • Sr Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 195
Re: Restoring the churches and historical buildings in Bohol
« Reply #10 on: November 02, 2013, 11:36:16 PM »
There are process that could be used to restore the Churches but the cost could prohibit their use.
I seen the use of a type of foam injected under building foundation not only to stabilize the foundation but to lift the building and floors so they are back to level. I have also seen it used under a road bed that was sinking, the foam is injected and it fills in all the void and expands to lift the asphalt or concrete.
I have also seen it injected around manholes and large sewerlines to keep the ground water out.
I attended a class where the vendor of the foam inject company was giving away a car if anyone could break apart some foam that was in a cup,with their bare hands.They still own the car.
I'm sure the buildings can be restored, but it is all about money.

 


bisaya, cebuano, cebuano lessons, bisaya lessons
Romantic Tagalog