Author Topic: Roof Construction  (Read 9914 times)

Offline coleman2347

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Re: Roof Construction
« Reply #15 on: November 10, 2014, 12:02:23 PM »
One thing while we are on the topic of roofs...after the storm, I was noticing that most of the roofs that survived with little damage were Mansard style roofs....what they call here, four corner roofs....95% of the roofs that survived were of that type. No gables so harder to vent...but much less susceptible to wind damage.
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Offline graham

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Re: Roof Construction
« Reply #16 on: November 10, 2014, 01:23:12 PM »
In the states, I had the same thing Fred was talking about, two of them, 60x40 attic.  But what I also had was an attic vent fan on a thermostatically controlled switch, that turned it on and off based on attic temp.
I also had a whole house fan, vented directly to the attic, when I was really hot and I didnt want to run the ac I just turned that on....will do the same here if I can find, if I dont go with concrete roof...

Lee,

My roof will need replacing soon. Gal. Iron. For 2+ years I have
been struggling with the idea to do it in concrete. I have decided
to redo with G.I. The reason: I have a mate that lives just along
the beach from me. He has a huge 3 story house with concrete
over various rooms. The house is very open, no wind stopping
doors/walls. All open plan.

When we are on the ground floor where the billiard table is, it is
open on 1 side and big arches on the opp wall. He had to buy one
of those industrial fans (30"?),  because it got so hot whenever
there was no breeze.

I have no soffits, my roof trusses sit on top of the external walls and
there is a gap of approx. 12" between the walls and the G.I. very rarely
does it get hot in the house. The trusses extend out approx 30" past the
walls. I think that's why my roof has not been taken off by the last
3 typhoons, no pressure build up between ceiling and roof. My roof is
a "Mansard" type. We call them "hip" roofs in Aussie.

If anyone could afford the electricity and water, we have, in some of the
hotter climates (40+ deg.) houses that have mounted on the roof peaks,
something similar to a sprinkler you would use in the garden. The houses
have no guttering and the water falls from the roof past windows and doors,
which changes the humidity, thereby cooling the house.

Graham


Offline coleman2347

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Re: Roof Construction
« Reply #17 on: November 10, 2014, 01:31:54 PM »
Graham, would it be possible for you to post some pictures here of your roof design, I think I got it but a couple of pictures would help...thanks for the ideas..Lee
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Offline graham

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Re: Roof Construction
« Reply #18 on: November 10, 2014, 02:15:46 PM »
Lee,

I'll give it a go, always have trouble
posting pics. Haven't done it for soo long now.
I'll have to find my photobucket account,
it's probably been repossessed LOL

I did have a signature etc. but one day it just
all disappeared, so didn't bother to fix it.

Graham

Offline ronnsb

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Re: Roof Construction
« Reply #19 on: November 11, 2014, 12:26:26 AM »
Lee...here in the states that would be called a hip roof. A mansard style roof is generally along the upper exterior walls with the main roof being flat.

Hip roofs are the way to go for exactly the reason you saw...they will survive much better than gable roofs. Glad you pointed that out about what roofs survived Yolanda.

I can't even imagine what you had to go through with Yolanda! I know it was a very horrific experience.
Ron in New Smyrna Beach, Florida

Offline Art, just a re(tired) Fil-Am

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Re: Roof Construction
« Reply #20 on: November 11, 2014, 12:38:36 AM »
One thing while we are on the topic of roofs...after the storm, I was noticing that most of the roofs that survived with little damage were Mansard style roofs....what they call here, four corner roofs....95% of the roofs that survived were of that type. No gables so harder to vent...but much less susceptible to wind damage.
Lee,
That is a good observation, because we have the hip style roof made from concrete roofing tiles and have withstood every hurricane that came our way dead on with the eye of the storm!
Our home is now 15 yrs old and has had a 3rd paint job. 
Hurricanes are scary to sit it out, but we survived them all that came our way! "Knock on wood"!
« Last Edit: November 11, 2014, 12:55:03 AM by Art, just a re(tired) Fil-Am »
"Life is what we all make it to be"!
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"Different strokes for different folks"!
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Offline coleman2347

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Re: Roof Construction
« Reply #21 on: November 11, 2014, 12:38:50 AM »
Lee...here in the states that would be called a hip roof. A mansard style roof is generally along the upper exterior walls with the main roof being flat.

Hip roofs are the way to go for exactly the reason you saw...they will survive much better than gable roofs. Glad you pointed that out about what roofs survived Yolanda.

I can't even imagine what you had to go through with Yolanda! I know it was a very horrific experience.

Ron thanks for pointing that out, you are absolutely correct its a hip roof.  I had always called that roof a mansard and stand corrected..thanks...somewhere here I have a picture of a house that was left standing after the storm, everything around the house was gone..just friggin gone.  all the neighbors houses, concrete fences..cars trucks everything..In the middle of all this devastation was one house..poured concrete, hip roof....I went and looked as close as I could because Mike and I both were amazed,  the house lost the windows on the wave side, some gutter on the wave (sea) side but otherwise was untouched...I would guess the house was about thirty to forty meters from the beach.  The wave created by the storm surge was documented to be about 30 feet or about nine something meters.  And as we all know, the winds were about 200mph...
« Last Edit: November 11, 2014, 12:41:36 AM by coleman2347 »
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Offline coleman2347

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Re: Roof Construction
« Reply #22 on: November 11, 2014, 12:46:43 AM »
The only thing worse than wanting to do it is not doing it

Offline hitekcountry

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Re: Roof Construction
« Reply #23 on: November 11, 2014, 01:04:44 AM »
This is what I always thought to be a mansard roof

Offline ronnsb

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Re: Roof Construction
« Reply #24 on: November 11, 2014, 05:29:45 AM »
Lee...wow! 30 feet...thats a lot! We have never had anything even close to that here in the Daytona Beach area. Sure, a few hurricanes here and there, but nothing more than about 110 mph. Yeah, the photos are hip roofs!

hitekcountry... most definitely a mansard roof there!
Ron in New Smyrna Beach, Florida

Offline Shewmake

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Re: Roof Construction
« Reply #25 on: November 11, 2014, 08:00:22 AM »
When we built our bungalow. I did a little research and came across this website (there are many), and found it helpful. Our roof is a hip roof style which many of these sites say is the best for typhoon prone areas, with minimum of 22-26 degree pitch. Worth a look.

http://www.ndmindia.nic.in/techadvgroup/rvs/cyclonearchitecture.pdf
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Offline fred

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Re: Roof Construction
« Reply #26 on: November 11, 2014, 08:17:46 AM »
When we built our bungalow. I did a little research and came across this website (there are many), and found it helpful. Our roof is a hip roof style which many of these sites say is the best for typhoon prone areas, with minimum of 22-26 degree pitch. Worth a look.

http://www.ndmindia.nic.in/techadvgroup/rvs/cyclonearchitecture.pdf


That roof definitely makes sense for high winds..You can just see it does!! Nice job.
One major consideration I had when we built ours was a large eves.. Large enough to shade walls from dawn till dusk.
Hollow blocks are like heat storage batteries..The problem is that the heat from them is released to the interior at night..
Here`s a site I discovered that gives another perspective in helping solve that problem..

http://www.smarterhomes.org.nz/design/passive-cooling/

Of course for those that have lived through Yolanda,their roofing plans and priorities will be different and understandably so..
If I lived there after seeing the aftermath in pictures,nothing less than an underground concrete bunker would good enough for me.
I`m actually going to build one here in Bohol. Yolanda was at first predicted to hit us directly.. There is always a chance that the next one will..
Hopefully we will be ready for it!

Offline ABCDeVil

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Re: Roof Construction
« Reply #27 on: November 18, 2014, 05:54:33 PM »
Just a thought. If you added roof ventilation, or as we call them in Aus, whirlybirds, would they be more effective if you also added vents to the ceilings or each room. Would this also draw in more air and help cool the house inside, even more?

ABC

Offline medic3500

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Re: Roof Construction
« Reply #28 on: November 18, 2014, 07:19:50 PM »
Just guessing that the Roof vents (spinning type) would suck in rain during some of the more heavy downpours.

Offline coleman2347

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Re: Roof Construction
« Reply #29 on: November 19, 2014, 03:30:23 AM »
Dan, I never noticed that the ones I had in the states did that and we usually got a couple or more hurricanes a season. I think the reason was I have vented gables and during storms the wind would pressurize the attic, just a guess though
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