Author Topic: TonyandJelma asked a question on moving to the Philippines  (Read 4349 times)

Offline D. Williams

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In this thread, http://www.livinginthephilippines.com/forum/index.php?topic=50216.msg69265;topicseen#msg69265
I felt a new topic might be called for so they can get less restricted answers.
Quote
Do we have anyone here who retired from the military and went straight to the Philippines? I am wondering about the process of household goods shipment, travel, etc...

Offline Art, just a re(tired) Fil-Am

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Re: Tony and Jelma asked a question on moving to the Philippines
« Reply #1 on: May 29, 2015, 04:58:23 AM »
Tony and Jelma,
First of all, welcome to the board!
Are you still on active duty and in 2 years you will retire and immediately move to the Philippines? What's you home of records? I assume you already know shipping of your household goods is only shipped to your home of record from your last duty station prior to retirement and from there you are on your own to ship to the Philippines. If you are dead set in shipping your household goods to the Philippines, you better do your homework on how to do it by a reputable overseas shipping company.
You can start here to do your research - https://goo.gl/YmwxTd
When I retired from the USAFR and Civil Service in 1997 with 30 yrs of service, we got rid of everything we owned and move to the Philippines the following year. We only shipped 10 Balikbayan boxes of necessary items to a relative for safe keeping prior to our arrival in the Philippines. From there we started our lives anew from scratch renting for 2 years before moving into our newly built home in 2001.
17 years later we're still here and enjoying our retirement lifestyle in the modern suburbs of Sta Rosa, Laguna NCR of Luzon, the only place we would rather be, since it's our roots and home for the long haul come hell or high waters.  ::) ??? :o ;)
BTW, since you're military, you maybe interested in the Expanded SRRV program. Read up  on it here under the Expanded SRRV topic. http://www.livinginthephilippines.com/forum/index.php?topic=50132.0
« Last Edit: May 29, 2015, 05:24:14 AM by Art, just a re(tired) Fil-Am »
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Offline bigrod

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Re: TonyandJelma asked a question on moving to the Philippines
« Reply #2 on: May 29, 2015, 08:45:12 AM »
When you retire from the military your household goods can be shipped to any location in the CONUS, your home of record outside the CONUS or the place from which you were called to active duty.  So you have the option of shipping to a West Coast port then paying from that point to the Philippines.  See below:
http://www.military.com/military-transition/relocation-assistance-and-planning/shipping-entitlements.html
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Offline JoeLP

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Re: TonyandJelma asked a question on moving to the Philippines
« Reply #3 on: May 29, 2015, 12:30:12 PM »
Not sure of the whole setup and how it worked, but have two friends here who did the same thing.  One was military(USN) the other just a 'kano.  Both loaded up containers(one actually loaded up almost every appliance and piece of furniture as well as a few other things in a large shipping container) the other just a large 2 pallet sized container and shipped them here and neither had to pay a dime of fees because both had Pinay wives and they used some law where any returning native can move all personal effects back to the phils duty free.

Now, the 'kano, paid over $5k to have that shipping container shipped from California to Northern Samar, but it had pretty much all of his nice new US appliances as well as all he nice beds and other things that are pretty much impossible to find in the Phils unless you're willing to vastly overpay.  The other had a couple appliances(stove, microwave, ect) sent over from Cali after finishing his time over in the middle east and had all his items shipped to Cali. 

In another thread someone brought up the legal jargon and all on what the exact rules are, but it's a good way to get out of paying any duty fees.  Still not the cheapest way to get things sent here.
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Offline BudM

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Re: TonyandJelma asked a question on moving to the Philippines
« Reply #4 on: May 30, 2015, 05:21:54 PM »
All those nice new US appliances should work real well over here.
Whatever floats your boat.

Offline coleman2347

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Re: TonyandJelma asked a question on moving to the Philippines
« Reply #5 on: May 30, 2015, 08:21:08 PM »
When I came I sent over 40 BB boxes, at somewhere over 100usd apiece..it would have been cheaper in the long run to send a container...then I could have sent stuff like my yard tractor, welders, major power tools...you live and learn
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Offline Art, just a re(tired) Fil-Am

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Re: TonyandJelma asked a question on moving to the Philippines
« Reply #6 on: May 31, 2015, 02:04:21 AM »
All those nice new US appliances should work real well over here.
Aren't most U.S. appliances still 110v? Good luck finding a rental home with 110v  outlets, but they are available here and there. 
"Life is what we all make it to be"!
"It's always a matter of money"!
"Do on to others as they would do on to You, but do it first"!
"Different strokes for different folks"!
"Que Sera Sera"!

Offline M.C.A.

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Re: TonyandJelma asked a question on moving to the Philippines
« Reply #7 on: May 31, 2015, 09:15:07 AM »
You can ship your house hold stuff here, I think the there's a weight restriction of 7,000 lbs.  There's an attached document, basically you'll need to be a 13a Non-Immigrant Card holder and have documents prepared in advance.

http://www.philippineembassy-usa.org/uploads/pdfs/DutyFreeImportation.pdf
My views would be from someone who lives out in the province close to in-laws on a pension.  Norwegian and French heritage.

Offline BudM

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Re: TonyandJelma asked a question on moving to the Philippines
« Reply #8 on: May 31, 2015, 11:38:09 AM »
All those nice new US appliances should work real well over here.
Aren't most U.S. appliances still 110v? Good luck finding a rental home with 110v  outlets, but they are available here and there.

That is what I would think and as far as something like a clothes dryer, I am not a master electrician or even a journeyman so I am not sure if one of those would work properly without some changes in your home.  I know the only thing I shipped here was stuff that was muliti-voltage and only two items that were 110.  Have a small converter for those.  Well, one was a DVD player that I had not used much and I had just bought me a new DVD player here and fixed it to play muliti-region.  In the process, I had a DVD in the 110 player so I wanted to get it out and was in a hurry with something else to so guess what?  I plugged it in forgetting about the converter and next thing you know, pop and fried.  I then had a screwdriver tearing the thing apart so I could get my DVD before I put the player in the trash.  I have one item now that I need the converter on.  And I might just get a new one to replace that so I can throw it away and be over with that mess.
Whatever floats your boat.

Offline Steve & Myrlita

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Re: TonyandJelma asked a question on moving to the Philippines
« Reply #9 on: May 31, 2015, 04:38:07 PM »
You can ship your house hold stuff here, I think the there's a weight restriction of 7,000 lbs.  There's an attached document, basically you'll need to be a 13a Non-Immigrant Card holder and have documents prepared in advance.

http://www.philippineembassy-usa.org/uploads/pdfs/DutyFreeImportation.pdf
Just an FYI. 13A is an immigrant visa but non-quota.
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Offline M.C.A.

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Re: TonyandJelma asked a question on moving to the Philippines
« Reply #10 on: May 31, 2015, 07:21:44 PM »
You can ship your house hold stuff here, I think the there's a weight restriction of 7,000 lbs.  There's an attached document, basically you'll need to be a 13a Non-Immigrant Card holder and have documents prepared in advance.

http://www.philippineembassy-usa.org/uploads/pdfs/DutyFreeImportation.pdf
Just an FYI. 13A is an immigrant visa but non-quota.


Good point Steve, if he's single ? ... this won't work if your single, sorry, so if single sell your stuff and send only the important stuff you can't live without in BB boxes, I did this, same with the car, you don't want to bring a vehicle at any costs, buy it here.
My views would be from someone who lives out in the province close to in-laws on a pension.  Norwegian and French heritage.

Offline cvgtpc1

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Re: TonyandJelma asked a question on moving to the Philippines
« Reply #11 on: June 01, 2015, 12:10:31 AM »
When you retire from the military your household goods can be shipped to any location in the CONUS, your home of record outside the CONUS or the place from which you were called to active duty.  So you have the option of shipping to a West Coast port then paying from that point to the Philippines.  See below:
http://www.military.com/military-transition/relocation-assistance-and-planning/shipping-entitlements.html


What I did 20 years ago, had a job in South Korea right after the USAF.  My company paid for the CONUS to Korea leg.

Offline BudM

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Re: TonyandJelma asked a question on moving to the Philippines
« Reply #12 on: June 01, 2015, 09:51:22 AM »
I was single back when I moved here and using that logic, I got rid of a lot of stuff and just shipped bb boxes.  I got a deal on them for 65 bucks each on large ones plus one box for a TV at 260.  Shipped all for a little over 700.  The heck with the appliances but I wished I had spent a few thousand to ship a container with all my furniture along with some tools, etc that I got rid off.  Could have wasted less time ensuring all those boxes were packed properly after unpacking and repacking some and spent another 50 bucks on packing tape.  Could have just loaded it all in a container and then other stuff that I wished I had kept.  With better planning I might have even found someone else who wanted to split the costs of the container since I only would have needed no more than half of it.  Always thrilling to think back at what you could have done if you knew what you know now and had planned better.
Whatever floats your boat.

Offline cvgtpc1

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Re: TonyandJelma asked a question on moving to the Philippines
« Reply #13 on: June 01, 2015, 10:15:41 AM »
With better planning I might have even found someone else who wanted to split the costs of the container since I only would have needed no more than half of it.  Always thrilling to think back at what you could have done if you knew what you know now and had planned better.

Hmmm....a possible business.  But from what I've read it appears to be a big hassle once the container hits the PI port to get it out of of hock.

Offline JoeLP

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Re: TonyandJelma asked a question on moving to the Philippines
« Reply #14 on: June 02, 2015, 09:53:05 AM »
All those nice new US appliances should work real well over here.
Aren't most U.S. appliances still 110v? Good luck finding a rental home with 110v  outlets, but they are available here and there.
The man I'm talking about was a career white collar exec.  He has a very nice house on the beach.  His fridge(one of the largest Maytag makes) is a 220, as well as his deepfreeze.  He had to get an avr for his oven and microwave though.  His dryer is a 220, and he needed another avr for his washer.  The rest of his items (electronics mostly) were new enough to be 110/220 setups and he just plugged them in.  So what he has and did wasn't and option for me.  My income just doesn't allow me to have a lot of the items he does. 
He even joked(i sorta shook my head) on his riding mower costing him too much money and how he should have given it to his family and bought a diesel version before he came.  So yes, his American appliances are doing just fine here really.  In including he few 110s.
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