Author Topic: UK NHS  (Read 2815 times)

Offline Colin

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UK NHS
« on: January 02, 2016, 03:42:29 AM »
I would advise any Brit moving permamantly to the Philippines not to break their connection with the NHS. If you go back later for treatment you may be asked to pay. It seems that we were accepted because we are fully paid and both receive a government pensions, but we were asked about our status several times and had to put it in writing.
Colin
Puerto Princesa, Palawan & London, UK

Offline Colin

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Re: UK NHS
« Reply #1 on: March 06, 2019, 06:07:21 PM »
I would advise any Brit moving permamantly to the Philippines not to break their connection with the NHS. If you go back later for treatment you may be asked to pay. It seems that we were accepted because we are fully paid and both receive a government pensions, but we were asked about our status several times and had to put it in writing.

Correction, it seems that were  accepted because I stated that we were planning to rent property which we then did. Initially when we were staying with my daughter the GP accepted us but told us that we may have to pay.
Colin
Puerto Princesa, Palawan & London, UK

Offline codefreeze

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Re: UK NHS
« Reply #2 on: March 06, 2019, 08:09:12 PM »
The rules were changed some time back and there was some heated discussion about this on this forum. I would have to dig out what the rules now are. But yes, you need to be wary and make sure you have the latest info if you moved to Phils, but come back to UK for treatment etc.

Offline Peter

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Re: UK NHS
« Reply #3 on: March 07, 2019, 07:30:45 AM »
The rules were changed some time back and there was some heated discussion about this on this forum. I would have to dig out what the rules now are. But yes, you need to be wary and make sure you have the latest info if you moved to Phils, but come back to UK for treatment etc.

Last time I checked (last year) the basic rule was, if you have been resident overseas, when you "return on a permanent basis", you have to wait 6 months from date of arrival, before you can use the NHS for free.

A&E and Casualty are, of course, always free during the 6 months, as you will be classed as a visitor/tourist and thus entitled, but GP visits, consultations, treatment and referrals must be paid for.

Really depends on how honest you are in declaring your status, but the cost of being caught is not something to take lightly, IMHO of course!

Peter
Noli nothis permittere te terere.
Virtus autem corruptibilis est,
summa virtute prorsus corrumpitur,

Offline David690

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Re: UK NHS
« Reply #4 on: March 09, 2019, 08:26:18 PM »
In April 2015, changes were made to way that the NHS charges overseas visitors for NHS hospital care.  These changes also affect some former UK residents of the UK, who may be required to pay for their hospital treatment costs while in England.  Free NHS is provided on the basis of the person being ordinarily resident.  It dose not depend on nationality, paying taxes, national insurance contributions, being registered with a GP, having a NHS number, or owning property in UK.  People who live outside of EEA, including former UK residents should make sure they are covered by a personal healthcare insurance.  Anyone who does not have insurance will be charged at 150% of the NHS national tariff for any care they receive.
Citizens who return to UK on a settled basis will be classed as ordinarily resident and will be entitled to free NHS care immediately.
Londoner at heart

Offline iamjames

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Re: UK NHS
« Reply #5 on: March 09, 2019, 09:30:17 PM »
For 400 years the british invaded and conquered much of the world. The message was always: Our queen is Your queen. You are part of OUR commonwealth.
The problem now is that the many millions from those countries come to the shores of the UK saying "we have come to see "OUR" Queen or we have come to see "OUR" country. Now the healthcare rules become complicated because we cannot be seen to be racist. . How do we solve this VERY complicated problem?

LOL - I am Irish so I just sit back and laugh.

Offline Colin

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Re: UK NHS
« Reply #6 on: March 09, 2019, 11:56:52 PM »

Citizens who return to UK on a settled basis will be classed as ordinarily resident and will be entitled to free NHS care immediately.

What constitutes a 'settled basis'? Renting property, having a UK bank account????

Colin
Colin
Puerto Princesa, Palawan & London, UK

Offline Peter

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Re: UK NHS
« Reply #7 on: March 10, 2019, 12:05:26 PM »
What constitutes a 'settled basis'? Renting property, having a UK bank account????

Colin

Colin.

Like a lot of government terms, "settled basis" may, probably, be defined by the government agency/interviewer on a case by case basis.

I can tell you definitely, having a UK bank account does not confer "settled basis" on the account holder.

I can only go by what a former work colleague had to go through a couple of years ago when he returned after working overseas for 25 years. He went to sign on with his local GP and had to produce his current passport as proof he was:
1) British with a right to be in country;
2) To confirm when he had returned;
3) To confirm how long he had been out of the country on a "non-resident" basis.

Eventually, after many weeks of delay, with paperwork shooting back and forth as a decision had to come from the NHS Area HQ, he was signed on. What helped, he said, was he started a new job during the process and was able to show his full time, employment contract. That really was the thing that tipped it in his favour.

The NHS 'jobsworth" he was referred to, said he would have to prove he had been in the country for 6 months, before being entitled to NHS GP and other specialist services.

Luckily, in his case, during the 8 or 9 weeks it took for a decision, he didn't need the local GP's services. His company had on-site medical facilities for their employees, which covered him for the day-to-day aches and pains.

Others will, of course, have different experiences.

Peter
Noli nothis permittere te terere.
Virtus autem corruptibilis est,
summa virtute prorsus corrumpitur,

Offline David690

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Re: UK NHS
« Reply #8 on: March 10, 2019, 09:11:59 PM »
What constitutes a 'settled basis'? Renting property, having a UK bank account????

Colin

No and no.  Settled means that, settled, ie settled there, as in living there.  Showing that UK has become your place of residence, I'd suggest by having been in the country for several months, it has been suggested 6 months, possibly having a job there or enrolment in full time study.  I don't think that there's an official list of ways to demonstrate your settlement status.
Londoner at heart

Offline lost_in_samoa

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Re: UK NHS
« Reply #9 on: March 12, 2019, 07:48:12 AM »

Offline Peter

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Re: UK NHS
« Reply #10 on: March 12, 2019, 03:39:06 PM »
Rising Cost of Universal Health Care

From "Media Bias/Fact Check website at
< https://mediabiasfactcheck.com/washington-free-beacon/  >

Quote" These media sources are moderately to strongly biased toward conservative causes through story selection and/or political affiliation. They may utilize strong loaded words (wording that attempts to influence an audience by using appeal to emotion or stereotypes), publish misleading reports and omit reporting of information that may damage conservative causes. Some sources in this category may be untrustworthy. "Unquote

I struggle to understand how an opinion piece which ends up trashing Democratic policies in the USA, from the Washington Free Beacon (which is classed as an extremely right biased and somewhat untrustworthy source by the independant Media Bias/Fact Check) on the Finnish Government's woes (which was caused by loosing a Parliamentary vote) has to do with a question posed by "iamjames" about the UK National Health Service.

In my experience, what may be good practice in one country, may be bad in another. And, of course, vice versa. One size does not fit all.

IMHO of course.

Peter
Noli nothis permittere te terere.
Virtus autem corruptibilis est,
summa virtute prorsus corrumpitur,

Offline lost_in_samoa

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Re: UK NHS
« Reply #11 on: March 12, 2019, 04:10:08 PM »
 Media Bias Fact Check: Incompetent or Dishonest?


I struggle to understand

I know you do. 

I suspect that the OP and other respondents struggle with it too.  And Jimmy-me-boyo voiced the question.  Which is why I quoted him.

Universal health care systems are a scam.  A Ponzi scheme to be exact.

They only function as long as the payments into the system exceed the payout, and admin costs.   

Eventually .... after lots of rule clarifying, eligibility granting, taxing, enforcing, people dying, wailing, speechifying, and gnashing of teeth ....  they collapse.   

If you take the time to look beyond the kindergarten level you will see that all of the collective health systems on the globe are failing for essentially the same reasons.  More going out than coming in.

In my experience .... history does not repeat itself, but it rhymes.   Geography has very little bearing on the outcome.

The human race has tried this over and over and over and ...... Finland is just the example  ..... from this week.

So in direct answer to Jimmy and the other thread participants ........  don't rely on, or participate in, a system that is defrauding you and going to fail.
« Last Edit: March 12, 2019, 04:41:50 PM by lost_in_samoa »

Offline Peter

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Re: UK NHS
« Reply #12 on: March 13, 2019, 03:18:04 PM »
Media Bias Fact Check: Incompetent or Dishonest?


I know you do. 

I suspect that the OP and other respondents struggle with it too.  And Jimmy-me-boyo voiced the question.  Which is why I quoted him.
Universal health care systems are a scam.  A Ponzi sch
eme
to be exact.

They only function as long as the payments into the system exceed the payout, and admin costs.   

Eventually .... after lots of rule clarifying, eligibility granting, taxing, enforcing, people dying, wailing, speechifying, and gnashing of teeth ....  they collapse.   

If you take the time to look beyond the kindergarten level you will see that all of the collective health systems on the globe are failing for essentially the same reasons.  More going out than coming in.

In my experience .... history does not repeat itself, but it rhymes.   Geography has very little bearing on the outcome.

The human race has tried this over and over and over and ...... Finland is just the example  ..... from this week.

So in direct answer to Jimmy and the other thread participants ........  don't rely on, or participate in, a system that is defrauding you and going to fail.

Seems like it's situation normal. Slag off the posters, then try to justify it with your own prejudices.

Peter
Noli nothis permittere te terere.
Virtus autem corruptibilis est,
summa virtute prorsus corrumpitur,

Offline lost_in_samoa

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Re: UK NHS
« Reply #13 on: March 13, 2019, 03:30:04 PM »
Seems like it's situation normal. Attack the posters, then try to justify it with your own prejudices

Sounds familar.

Offline Colin

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Re: UK NHS
« Reply #14 on: March 13, 2019, 05:35:14 PM »
No and no.  Settled means that, settled, ie settled there, as in living there.  Showing that UK has become your place of residence, I'd suggest by having been in the country for several months, it has been suggested 6 months, possibly having a job there or enrolment in full time study.  I don't think that there's an official list of ways to demonstrate your settlement status.
If you rent property, the local council will put you on the voting register. I would have thought that this would go a long way towards being shown as settled. The whole system seems a bit vague and is down to individual interpretation.
Colin
Puerto Princesa, Palawan & London, UK

 


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