Author Topic: language-tagalog or bisayan to english books  (Read 849 times)

Offline nerd4444

  • Full Member
  • **
  • Posts: 6
language-tagalog or bisayan to english books
« on: March 16, 2018, 01:45:27 AM »
I saw a post about filipino language books to English. I am interested in acquiring such.

george

Offline sussexrob

  • Full Member
  • **
  • Posts: 41
Re: language-tagalog or bisayan to english books
« Reply #1 on: March 16, 2018, 05:54:41 PM »
I have purchased a few books to try and learn the language.   Depending on which part you are living in, if you are in the Visayas,  I can recommend  a book titled Maayong Buntag, written by a guy called Steve W. Chadde.   Very good read and very helpful , includes English-Visayan and Visayan -English Dictionaries.

Offline nerd4444

  • Full Member
  • **
  • Posts: 6
Re: language-tagalog or bisayan to english books
« Reply #2 on: March 17, 2018, 09:02:09 AM »
thank you for info led me to purchanse on amazon.

Offline UNGGOY

  • New Member
  • *
  • Posts: 0
  • BANNED for insulting members
Re: language-tagalog or bisayan to english books
« Reply #3 on: March 26, 2018, 03:09:33 AM »
I saw a post about filipino language books to English. I am interested in acquiring such.

george
Only people in Manila speak Tagalog. And Bisayan is not a language.

With nearly 200 different languages spoken in the Philippines, it depends on what you want.

Personally, I think Filipino is best to learn. In Manila you will sound educated. And people should generally understand you in province. I personally hate Tagalog though.
This member has been BANNED for repeatedly insulting other members.

Offline Lee2

  • Administrator
  • Sr Member
  • ******
  • Posts: 3,385
  • *** Rest In Peace ***
Re: language-tagalog or bisayan to english books
« Reply #4 on: March 26, 2018, 09:53:32 AM »
Only people in Manila speak Tagalog. And Bisayan is not a language.

With nearly 200 different languages spoken in the Philippines, it depends on what you want.

Personally, I think Filipino is best to learn. In Manila you will sound educated. And people should generally understand you in province. I personally hate Tagalog though.
Sort of wrong according to Wiki
Quote
Visayan languages
Visayan (Bisaya or Binisaya) is a group of languages of the Philippines that are related to Tagalog and Bikol, all three of which are part of the Central Philippine languages. Most Visayan languages are spoken in the whole Visayas section of the country, but they are also spoken in the Bicol Region (particularly in Masbate), islands south of Luzon, such as those that make up Romblon, most of the areas of Mindanao and the province of Sulu located southwest of Mindanao. Some residents of Metro Manila also speak Visayan.

Over 30 languages constitute the Visayan language family. The Visayan language with the most speakers is Cebuano, spoken by 20 million people as a native language in Central Visayas, parts of Eastern Visayas, and most of Mindanao. Two other well-known and widespread Visayan languages are Hiligaynon (Ilonggo), spoken by 10 million in most of Western Visayas and SOCCSKSARGEN; and Waray-Waray, spoken by 3 million in Eastern Visayas.

The whole Philippines is not Tagalog and while people from the north may not like it, there is a whole other world in the middle to the south of wonderful warm people who would differ with anyone who says their language is not a language and that would include the current president of the Philippines.
Quote
Cebuano language
The Cebuano language, alternatively called Cebuan (/sɛˈbuːən/ seh-BOO-ən)[8][9] and also often colloquially albeit informally referred to by most of its speakers simply as Bisaya ("Visayan", not to be confused with other Visayan languages nor Brunei Bisaya language), is an Austronesian regional language spoken in the Philippines by about 21 million people, mostly in Central Visayas,[10] western parts of Eastern Visayas and most parts of Mindanao, most of whom belong to various Visayan ethnolingusitic groups, mainly the Cebuanos.[11] It is the by far the most widely spoken of the Visayan languages, which are in turn part of wider the Philippine languages. The reference to the language as Bisaya is not encouraged anymore by linguists due to the many languages within the Visayan language group that may be confused with the term. The Komisyon ng Wikang Filipino, the official regulating body of Philippine languages, spells the name of the language as Sebwano.
:) Happily married since 1994 & live part of the year in Cebu and the rest in S. Florida.

 


bisaya, cebuano, cebuano lessons, bisaya lessons
Romantic Tagalog