Author Topic: Education in the Philippines (revisited)  (Read 2255 times)

Offline JoeLP

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Re: Education in the Philippines (revisited)
« Reply #30 on: April 19, 2018, 09:57:24 PM »
Education here and now, at east in Northern Samar, is far below what education was for me, 30+ years ago in rural west Michigan at a school that was not thought well of.  But, like when I was at that school, at lot depends on the student and the student's parents.  A neighbor across the street has a family member who grew up in Catarman, went to school in Catarman, but as quick minded and had good knowledge.  Because of that, he became a part of one of the top engineer firms in Manila for a few years before getting a job offer in Japan, then New Zeeland, then to a bigger job in New Zeeland that took him to Qatar then back to New Zeeland. 
When he was in Japan, he was one of the lead engineers in the creation of the LRT2 in Manila. 
I've talked to this man.  He's a good and bright engineer.  But, if you started talking about books and literature...forget it.  Get into history and such and you see he lacks. He'll go quiet or switch topics. 
So yes, there is a lot lacking in general education concerning K-12 level schooling.  But, if you want to and work to rise to the top and take advantage of opportunities, you can become successful. 
But, Hestecrefter, there is not equal status on what is earned in more cases than not.  In the USA, a doctor in the Phils will not be given same status. The Dr. that I use here in Catarman left to the USA not long after college was complete.  Spent nearly 30 years in Tampa Bay, Florida at the hospital rising to being he top nurse(Managing Nurse) in the hospital and was in charge of all the nurses in the entire hospital.  But, unless he took classes and passed tests/exams...that was all the hire he could go...and he was happy with that.  Meanwhile Tina's high school friend did the same thing, but took night classes while doing nursing and got his PA license.  Then while a PA did more schooling to earn his MD.  And the hospital paid for all his schooling.  He never racked up any debt in the whole process and is now a doctor at a hospital in Maryland. 
I think there is usually something along those lines concerning teaching.  But I do know that for a few years when Washington DC couldn't find teachers wanting to teach there, they were grabbing teachers from the Philippines to teach at the inner city.  I think they were just brought straight in.  So even then there are exceptions.
My oldest son here in Catarman is really doing good in school now.  Had struggles earlier, but now he's come around and is 2nd in his class.  He was 24th just 2 years ago.  So he's putting in the time and wants to go to school for Computer engineering.  If he keeps his head on straight and focuses correctly...he will have the same opportunities to get out of the Phils and work his way up.  I think that is good for him.  But, he needs to "keep his nose to the grindstone" to make it happen.
In the land of the blind, the one eyed man is king.

Offline Peter

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Re: Education in the Philippines (revisited)
« Reply #31 on: April 21, 2018, 04:03:26 PM »
Hestecrefter

< I am guessing wages in Dubai and those places are as good or better than in the U.S., hence OFWs prefer to take jobs there and not in the U.S., Canada, Australia,  etc.    >

Having first hand knowledge of the hiring system/procedures of foreign workers in the GCC, it is not the level of renumeration that most OFWs go there for (although well qualified and experienced professionals are very well paid, the less skilled obviously paid less, but all are well paid when set against what they earn in their home country) but the relative ease of being hired, getting a working visa and arriving in the country to start earning.

The UAE (Dubai being one of the Emirates) and other GCC States have a very efficient and quick visa processing system. If a Government agency or private company have a specific requirement for, say 50 carpenters or 5 specialist professionals or a medical IT tech, most can get their future employees a visa within 2 working weeks and an OFW can be there in 3 after signing the initial contract in the Philippines.

Put that up against the hoops that a potential employer in the UK/USA/Australia/wherever has to jump through to get a foreigner a working visa to their country.

Most OFWs need to start earning as soon as possible and not have to wait for an undetermined length of time to be deployed. So waiting for a (Western) megabucks job, comes down to taking what I can get now.

"Bird in the hand, is worth two in the bush", comes to mind.

IMHO of course, tempered by 30 odd years of GCC experience.  8)  8)  8)

Peter
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summa virtute prorsus corrumpitur,

Offline David690

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Re: Education in the Philippines (revisited)
« Reply #32 on: April 21, 2018, 07:21:02 PM »
Hestecrefter

< I am guessing wages in Dubai and those places are as good or better than in the U.S., hence OFWs prefer to take jobs there and not in the U.S., Canada, Australia,  etc.    >

Having first hand knowledge of the hiring system/procedures of foreign workers in the GCC, it is not the level of renumeration that most OFWs go there for (although well qualified and experienced professionals are very well paid, the less skilled obviously paid less, but all are well paid when set against what they earn in their home country) but the relative ease of being hired, getting a working visa and arriving in the country to start earning.

Having lived and worked in Dubai for 36 years, I would say your assessment is spot on Peter.
The UAE (Dubai being one of the Emirates) and other GCC States have a very efficient and quick visa processing system. If a Government agency or private company have a specific requirement for, say 50 carpenters or 5 specialist professionals or a medical IT tech, most can get their future employees a visa within 2 working weeks and an OFW can be there in 3 after signing the initial contract in the Philippines.

Put that up against the hoops that a potential employer in the UK/USA/Australia/wherever has to jump through to get a foreigner a working visa to their country.

Most OFWs need to start earning as soon as possible and not have to wait for an undetermined length of time to be deployed. So waiting for a (Western) megabucks job, comes down to taking what I can get now.

"Bird in the hand, is worth two in the bush", comes to mind.

IMHO of course, tempered by 30 odd years of GCC experience.  8)  8)  8)

Peter
Londoner at heart

Offline jjcabgou

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Re: Education in the Philippines (revisited)
« Reply #33 on: April 22, 2018, 12:09:31 PM »
Yes there are some good schools in the Philippines where you can get a quality education:
https://www.townandcountry.ph/people/heritage/how-much-it-costs-to-study-at-some-of-manila-s-top-high-schools-a1600-20170713-lfrm5

Most of my neighbors went to schools such as these listed

So yes, many of the examples pointed out by many members citing "highly educated Filipinos" is absolutely a correct statement.  These schools pump out hundreds, maybe even a few thousand, annually.     Total population of the Philippines is over 106 million.   

Offline BudM

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Re: Education in the Philippines (revisited)
« Reply #34 on: April 22, 2018, 02:24:15 PM »
Yes there are some good schools in the Philippines where you can get a quality education:
https://www.townandcountry.ph/people/heritage/how-much-it-costs-to-study-at-some-of-manila-s-top-high-schools-a1600-20170713-lfrm5

Most of my neighbors went to schools such as these listed

So yes, many of the examples pointed out by many members citing "highly educated Filipinos" is absolutely a correct statement.  These schools pump out hundreds, maybe even a few thousand, annually.     Total population of the Philippines is over 106 million.

What is your point in harping on this never ending subject JJ?  Are you saying, unless we are rich, there is little chance our kids will get a quality education?  We have to be rich like your neighbors?  Fact is, some of those schools are not too bad near the 100k mark.  The ones around the 1/2 million mark could take a flying leap.  By time my kid gets to high school, there should be more quality (by your standards apparently) schools.  Crap, we might have moved to another country by then.  Who knows.  No JJ.  Not the US.  I want more chance of a quality education for him.  Not saying there is no place there that it could not happen but I want more of a chance.
Whatever floats your boat.

Offline JoeLP

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Re: Education in the Philippines (revisited)
« Reply #35 on: April 22, 2018, 05:47:50 PM »
Yes there are some good schools in the Philippines where you can get a quality education:
https://www.townandcountry.ph/people/heritage/how-much-it-costs-to-study-at-some-of-manila-s-top-high-schools-a1600-20170713-lfrm5

Most of my neighbors went to schools such as these listed

So yes, many of the examples pointed out by many members citing "highly educated Filipinos" is absolutely a correct statement.  These schools pump out hundreds, maybe even a few thousand, annually.     Total population of the Philippines is over 106 million.

A better school does not always equal a better student.  Always exceptions.  Attending 4 different schools between K-12 I can tell you first hand that the brightest in 2 of the school I went to(where they received poor reviews repeatedly) were brighter than a good chuck of students in the other 2 schools I attended, one of which has received multiple national rewards.
The neighbor I mentioned went to Catarman High School.  The local public school.  Then went to UEP, where Tina's cousin went and was taking math classes his first year that I took in high school over 25 years ago.  But, the neighbor got what he needed.  He studied above and beyond the engineering lessons at school and what got him into the top level engineering firm was his high test scores.  That's all he needed to get where he is now working overseas making good money.
Having the opportunity to go to multiple schools, what I experiences was the kids who attended the better schools(usually in areas with better income levels) were kids who acted entitled.  As if the fact they went to their school, with higher rankings and awards, that they just needed to go there and that alone made them better students than neighboring schools.  That was no accurate across the board, but it was a predominant attitude that they exuded.
I went to Fremont High school in Michigan and Hesperia high school.  Arguably a top level and bottom level schools setup.  One that, when I went there, was ranked a top 5 school in the state, and the other, that as of when I last looked which was around 2004, never passed the governor's testing regulations.  But, I learned at both.  Had to go up a grade or so to take some classes in Hesperia, but, they had the education, if  I wanted it and was willing to work for it.  Same is true here in the Philippines if kids want to go overseas.  Are the parents going to do their job and prepare their kids to do what is needed to be done.  That is the real question.
The reason I'm moving to the USA for LJ's eduation is honestly for the areas that are taught there that just are not taught in the Phils.  The history, science, and so on.  Stuff that I know Tina, and her 3 siblings, each teachers, do not know but I was taught in high school or before.  You know, the stuff that when we are taking them we ask when we'll ever need to know that when we are adults.  Like advanced geometry and algebra and world, American, and Michigan history.  Or stuff like reading shakespear.  I want to force my son to learn that "worthless stuff" that is suppose to somehow help us in every day life as grown ups.  ;D
« Last Edit: April 23, 2018, 02:40:31 AM by JoeLP »
In the land of the blind, the one eyed man is king.

Offline BudM

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Re: Education in the Philippines (revisited)
« Reply #36 on: April 22, 2018, 09:38:37 PM »
Yeah, I know of a few of those "entitled" kids you are talking about.  According to everyone, who thinks they have a say in anything, those kids are so poor it is ridiculous.  Yet, they attend private elementary and high schools and act like they are privileged characters just as their parents believe about themselves.  My kid better think twice about his rear end getting booted if he starts thinking like them.  So, I have to be careful in picking a school for him if it turns out to be a private one and if it is a public, then it sure will not be near where I am now.
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Offline jjcabgou

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Re: Education in the Philippines (revisited)
« Reply #37 on: April 23, 2018, 06:52:00 AM »
A better school does not always equal a better student.  Always exceptions. 
Of course

 


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