Author Topic: Shutters  (Read 147 times)

Offline FastWalk

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Shutters
« on: September 22, 2018, 11:04:53 PM »
With the somewhat predictable storms,  what and how do you have shutters.

Is it really needed?

I believe there are several different ways to do it,  from attaching a board over the windows to installing a roll up door above them.  How have you done it,  and with what products?

Thanks for any ideas.
“Old men do not grow wise. They grow careful.”
“Keep on rocking in the free world”

Offline lost_in_samoa

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Re: Shutters
« Reply #1 on: September 23, 2018, 05:11:05 AM »
I believe there are several different ways to do it

Back in the day I was stationed down in Louisiana.   Dated a Creole for a while.  At her place she had double thick sheets of painted plywood with retained bolts around the edges.  Had matching nuts mounted in the wall studs.  Kept the assemblies against the wall behind her couch.

When bad weather rolled in she would hoist the sheets up to the corresponding window and ratchet them down.   

Totally home brew.  But it worked well and was not too inconvenient.

Hope this helps.
« Last Edit: September 23, 2018, 05:24:45 AM by lost_in_samoa »

Offline JoeLP

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Re: Shutters
« Reply #2 on: September 23, 2018, 08:56:14 AM »
We only had 2 storms that called for that level of preventative measures.  One we didn't even cover the windows just locked them and stuffed towels in the jams.  The last one we just grabbed some extra plywood we had and nailed it over our largest windows and left the rest alone.  Never had any trouble.  Both of those were hurricanes/typhoons that were class 3 and 4 when they hit us.  Now days I'm more concerned about if we have the stuff we'll need after the storm passes than the damage the storm will do when it hits us.
In the land of the blind, the one eyed man is king.

Offline FastWalk

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Re: Shutters
« Reply #3 on: September 23, 2018, 11:21:37 AM »
We only had 2 storms that called for that level of preventative measures.  One we didn't even cover the windows just locked them and stuffed towels in the jams.  The last one we just grabbed some extra plywood we had and nailed it over our largest windows and left the rest alone.  Never had any trouble.  Both of those were hurricanes/typhoons that were class 3 and 4 when they hit us.  Now days I'm more concerned about if we have the stuff we'll need after the storm passes than the damage the storm will do when it hits us.
Getting items after a storm can really be an issue.  I guess the storm Yolanda is the benchmark I think about because it walked right over us.

What all do you stock for after storm?   maybe a sack of rice or two,  water, fuel for your generator  and .... ??
“Old men do not grow wise. They grow careful.”
“Keep on rocking in the free world”

Offline lost_in_samoa

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Re: Shutters
« Reply #4 on: September 23, 2018, 01:26:36 PM »
What all do you stock for after storm?


That is a really deep subject.  Which usually raises the hackles of the "Don't Worry Be Happy" crowd. 

Ompong was our 9th or 10th encounter with a Hurricane/Typhoon/Cyclone.  I lost count. 

Some of the roads are still flooded out here.   Power was finally restored through out our barangay yesterday.  Markets are not empty but you can see the difference.  Most of the crops are lost.  Lots of dead livestock.

I'd venture to say that a month's worth of supplies would be sufficient to down grade a catastrophe into a problem.  Some folks say 3, some say 6 or 12.  It is a hard choice.   Hell.  A day is better than nothing.

Pure water is the #1.  Store lots of it.  Better yet get the equipment to make it.  Serious quality filters.  Like a Big Berkey.  Maybe a distiller if you feel the need for "medical" water.  I use an Aquapure MD-4.  Slow but solid stainless steel.

Hulled rice goes bad.  Especially in the super humidity we are feeling now.  If your gonna store rice, then rotate the inventory into your daily meals to shorten the time between purchase and plate.

Palay, (rice in the hull),  has a much longer shelf life.  Almost unlimited.  So you might consider storing palay and having a micro mill.

Dried goods do not do well here.  Too much humidity.  You can either vacuum or, CO2 pack.  Both seem to work well.  Family loves its Toyu.  So we store a bunch of it CO2 packed.

Canned goods appear to have about a 12 -> 18 month shelf life.  Not so much because of the contents, but the container.  Ester had corrosion eat a pin hole in a can of Ligo on the back of her stores.  It went banglus and exploded.  Sprayed very aromatic "fermented" fish bits all over everything.  We have a bunch of cans that we stripped bare and painted with wax.  They seem to be holding up well.

Any thing cold bath or pressure canned into glass has a good shelf life.  Just finished a plate full of Tinola with 6 year old Rabbit carne in it.  If you go that route you have to keep the jars out of the sun and at a stable temperature.  Heat expansion/contraction will work the seal loose.

Illumination.   Our power coop kills the grid before any significant weather.  So we have a few flash lights, kerosene lamps, and a box of candles.  Using them cuts our current draw on the batteries to just the essentials.

Medical supplies.  I ripped my big toenail off the other day.  Then smashed the same toe under a ladder foot.  My B.I.L. mangled the tip of his index finger in a grass shredder.  My niece slashed the ball of her heel on a bit of glass wading across the street.

Basic small injury stuff.  We have some trauma supplies and IFAK's.  Know how to use them.  Stock heavy on anti septics and over the counter pain meds.  Any thing larger than that and you are into emergency first aid prior to a hospital visit.

None of the hospitals closed down.  But we could not get to them for a day or two.  The local pharmacy was flooded.  So if your medicine dependent then it might be smart to have a supply on the shelf and rotate through it. 

How much would be governed by  storage conditions and shelf life.   Some stuff gets weaker,  some gets stronger, some gets lethal as it ages.   

Heads up.  Know what you need and how to store it.  Its normal for us to refrigerate a few bottles of insulin for our neighbors.

Hope this helps.
« Last Edit: September 23, 2018, 01:52:07 PM by lost_in_samoa »

Offline FastWalk

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Re: Shutters
« Reply #5 on: September 23, 2018, 10:50:31 PM »

I'd venture to say that a month's worth of supplies would be sufficient to down grade a catastrophe into a problem.  Some folks say 3, some say 6 or 12.  It is a hard choice.   Hell.  A day is better than nothing.


As always thanks for you great ideas.

Being ready is in my opinion always a good choice.  I remember the kids story about this topic

<a href="http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ripQ9jJnw1c" target="_blank">http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ripQ9jJnw1c</a>.
“Old men do not grow wise. They grow careful.”
“Keep on rocking in the free world”

 


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