It’s Your Money > Building in the Philippines

Building in the Philippines

<< < (2/8) > >>

:
OK here goes, in mixing concrete and your not watching the proccess, you\'ll be short changed on cement in the mix. After 6 bags or so there\'s a extra bag to use on another project or money in the pocket. It doesn\'t matter that a bag of cement cost less then Php200, it\'s getting it that matters! The same logic goes for lenghs of steel bars. These are two areas are unsceen in the finshed project and they know that!

Also, they like the mix VERY WET so it\'s almost self leveling which means a VERY WEAK mix, but that doesn\'t matter, less work does. Also you\'ll find most will use the cheaper smooth stones in the mix instead of crushed rock meaning the cement doesn\'t have much to grab on too. And pouring a level smooth floor, forget it and I\'ll get into that with setting tile later.

Pouring a large area of concrete could mean stopping for a period of time and starting again, meaning a dry joint. Hours, (2 hour lunch?), means a \"dry joiint\" not just over night and do they  care? More that they don\'t know/understand the cemistry of concrete and how it reacts. Also, once poured it\'s left alone, no watering down for a slow cure. There\'s a way to handle dry joints or adding new concrete to old and it\'s called \"ready-fix\", a liquide that once applied gives a bound with the old.

How do they get away with all that? Basicly there\'s no stage inspections, (concrete, plumbing, electrical, framing), during building and the locals don\'t know any better as with most foreigners, ie open season.

Bottom line, you\'ll live with what you get, cracking, cement dust, (not enough cement and/or to wet, dried to fast), is common and not getting what you paid for! Granted, things might look mighty spiffy, but for how long? That\'s YOUR JOB to deside during building!

Yep, building in the Philippines isn\'t anywhere near State side standards where there\'s the local Government looking after your best interest, (inspections), and workers that take pride in their workmanship! The majority of Filipino workers operate with \'THAT\'S GOOD ENOUGH\' attitude and when you find a few that takes pride in their work, their worth their weight in gold! Well almost  ;D
B-Ray

 

tbevan:
Oustanding Forum. I look forward to reading all your members postings with home building experience. I must admit this is my shortfall and main worry when I start building. Anyone have ideas on how to find / screen the right workers,Foreman,designers etc....

1. Pro\'s and Cons on building from scratch or remodeling an older home??

Tom Bevan

Gray Wolf:
Tom,

Welcome to The Forum!  On January 1st we will officially close the LinP3 Yahoo list and invite all of our 11,000+ guests over to this new forum.  I\'m certain that you will get a tremendous amount of information from them.  We have guests over there who have been sharing all of the details anyone could think of about building, remodeling, costs, labor, supervision and so forth.  I look forward to seeing the answers here on our new Forum in a few days.

Thanks for being with us, Tom.  I look forward to reading more from you in the years to come.

Jack

:

--- Quote from: tbevan on December 29, 2007, 09:32:02 PM ---Oustanding Forum. I look forward to reading all your members postings with home building experience. I must admit this is my shortfall and main worry when I start building. Anyone have ideas on how to find / screen the right workers,Foreman,designers etc....

1. Pro\'s and Cons on building from scratch or remodeling an older home??

Tom Bevan



--- End quote ---

Gosh Tom, your questions are hard to answer.  As to workers, I went through the trail and error thingie for the 1st two years and have to live with what I got in some areas and  redone others. One of the two man crew I have now, I\'ve used for some two years for things that didn\'t take much know-how but always wanting to do and learn what the wife and I wanted. The other is a very good jack of many trades, master of none. About like me and in some areas much better, LMAO.  We both have commented on how much we have learned from each other, a win-win situation.

In building, I got a strong building because I was on location daily and wouldn\'t put up with any crap and over built to start with.  Cutting corners, that\'s good enough is common, but over specting is an arrea a contractor feels they can REALLY line their pockets and nothing the worse for it. You just don\'t get what your paying for.

Remolding you may not know what your really getting from the get-go? What I look at with what might be called a standard Pinoy house by foreign standards, 2  BRs 1 CR and under 70 sq meters is 4 walls and a roof and expect to spend another Php200,000± in making it rentable. Figuring on changing ALL plumbing, including seperating the gray water from the towlet drain to a septic, whatever it takes, (soaps and bleaches KILLs the septic action) and electrical from the get-go!! Tiling and/or retiling, repairing  cracks and paint. Wooden door/window frames and doors might have to be replaced as well as some rafters, (termits).

I now realize that these Pinoy houses have been standing for some decades, so even with the \"that\'s good enough\" thingie doesn\'t mean it\'s going to fall down around you ears. Knowing the problem area and getting them taken care of from the get-go means, not trying to make things work on a regular bases, It\'s the old pay now or pay later and your going to pay thingie! If you can buy and remoldel for Php1m and size and area meets your needs, you have a good deal, IMO. But, if you think you can make more then 10% per month as a rental on your investment, you might be barking up the wrong tree, depending on the area? As an extra income is another story and best, IMO, having more then one. Building two seperate house will cost a LOT more then a two story building giving the same sq meters each!!

I can except less then perfect, but DANG it better work RIGHT!!  ;D If you can find expats in the area of interest that has done what you want to do and you can see their outcome, then you can evaluate how they did things and what they have learned. A lot of expats will except WHATEVER they get and are happy and that\'s OK. Their advise might be worth the \"you know what\" on a bore hog depending on your comfort zone!
B-Ray

:

--- Quote from: tbevan on December 29, 2007, 09:32:02 PM ---Oustanding Forum. I look forward to reading all your members postings with home building experience. I must admit this is my shortfall and main worry when I start building. Anyone have ideas on how to find / screen the right workers,Foreman,designers etc....
1. Pro\'s and Cons on building from scratch or remodeling an older home??
--- End quote ---
This is a pretty broad question and I\'m sure that you\'ll be getting many opinions from anecdotal experience.  I can only speak for mine. 

I\'ve been fortunate in that I picked a community to live in that is populated by a number of skilled carpenters, masons, plumbers and electricians.  Among them I have a select few who\'ve worked on nearly every project I\'ve ever undertaken over the past quarter of a century.  We\'re located on the west coast of Cebu, but have been involved with projects up and down our coast and in Abra as well.  I\'ve had the help of an architect and contractor who\'s also been a good friend of the family for all of those years.  He was my source for knowledge and advice in the beginning and we\'ve since worked on projects together.  We\'ve not had any particular problems that would be unique to the Philippines.  Our workers have been skilled, dependable and productive. 

To do business of any kind in the RP and have a chance of being satisfied, you need to understand the way that business is done here and that includes the construction trade.  There are always exceptions, but business is done on a personal level and like Filipino time, often schedules and deadlines have no bearing.  It does pay to culture friends in the trade and learn something of the local dialect as well.   ::)   Once you\'ve established relationships with suppliers, being a foreigner has no particular disadvantage. 

You must know by now that building from scratch or remodeling an existing home have very different requirements.  Yet the acquisition of materials and applying them are nearly the same.  I can\'t tell you which is better or cheaper and I\'ve done both.  Each project seems to have a mind of it\'s own.  My preference is to build anew because part of my enjoyment is in planning a design and incorporating some of the amenities I appreciate from the 1st world (electrical outlet placement in particular) the most.  I can do without a/c, but sometimes tear my hair trying to find an electrical outlet!  My Filipino friends say, \"One is enough, we have plenty of extensions!\"    >:(

Navigation

[0] Message Index

[#] Next page

[*] Previous page

Go to full version