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Author Topic: Philippines' Online/Modular Education  (Read 1159 times)

Offline Peter

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Philippines' Online/Modular Education
« on: February 25, 2021, 04:11:37 PM »
Parents/Guardians in the Philippines.

I'm wondering how your children are progressing with online schooling, or at-home modules, whichever is appropriate, if indeed there is any at all. On the "Beam" terrestial TV channel, on weekdays, there are a number of DepEd programmes aimed at Govt. school primary/grade level students. There are various subjects covered, so I presume (bad word I know LOL!) that each programme is tied to a formal lesson/module. Parents of Govt primary school children in our Barangay go to our local school each day to hand in the child's previous days work and collect the next set of lessons, as well as any teaacher reviewed or marked work.

My daughter has been home from SLU Baguio for nearly a year. She was 3 months into her final (5th) year of her MedTech course, when all the students were told by the Government, "You have 3 days to get out and go home!"
Since last April/May, however, the University has been conducting online classes, lectures and tutor support, for her year group, as well as individual (online) face-to-face exams/assessments. This culminated in January just past, with her (successful) "Finals".
This coming May, SLU will start a 3 month, online, series of reviews for her year/group, prior to the "MedTech National Board Examinations" (my words) her group is earmarked for in August. The "Board" would normally be taken in a formal examination setting in an appoved centre in Baguio, Manila or in other approved locations. How the August National exam will be conducted is still unknown.

SLU seem to have managed to get online education up and running quite efficiently, very quickly. There were more than 20,000 students attending SLU at the beginning of 2020 academic year and if only 50% carried on with their subject course and they all were successfully moved online (my daughter's course was up and running online within 5 weeks) then that is a great achievement for the university IT staff.

I'm very pleased with SLU's response; but I wonder, how has education been progressing in other parts of the Philippines?

Stay safe all.

Peter
« Last Edit: February 25, 2021, 04:21:03 PM by Peter »
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Offline JoeLP

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Re: Philippines' Online/Modular Education
« Reply #1 on: February 25, 2021, 05:53:34 PM »
Have three boys dealing with this right now.  One at the university, one in high school(Sr high) and one in kindergarten. 

The one in college(as well as my house keeper's daughter who goes to the same university) both said pretty much the same thing.  If you do what you are asked to do, it's pretty close to what was to be.  But, they both were quick to see it would be very easy to cheat in in more than a few cases, cheating did go on and problems arose because of it.  Some of the cheating cannot be stopped, hell, probably most of it.  But the ones that cost the most issues is on test days when an earlier class could quickly email all the questions for the test for they later classes.  The school finally decided that on test day, they'd set all the classes for that subject to test at the same time.  Took care of that one cheating setup.  But still, cheating is easier than ever now.  But, so far my son has done mostly his own work and got it done and has taken all his tests at home alone.  So proud of him on that.

The one in high school said pretty much the same thing.  It is much easier to cheat, but he's not up for it.  Unlike his older brother, he doesn't have the calls by teachers for as many "group studies" or "group projects" and as such does most his work at home on the laptop.  He was always the "brainy one" and has handled the transition well. 

The little one in kindergarten is probably the one most affected by this.  The structure is just not there.  Kindergarten is a much more hands on person to person thing that is used to build social skills and all that along with the education of facts.  So, we hired the housekeeper's daughter, who is going to school to be a teacher, to give him tutoring sessions every weekday.  It's all working for now.  Well, as well as can be expected. 

So for the high school and college, the system is working for them.  For the little one, not so much.
In the land of the blind, the one eyed man is king.