Living in The Philippines > Education in the Philippines

Education in the Philippines

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mandaluyong:
I have taught in private schools in Manila close to 20 years and am currently teaching in the US so you could say I have some idea about the subject. I was content with merely reading posts about how expats are faring in the Philippines, which I sorely miss, but then this topic came up and I knew I had to say something.

Before even considering the budget you need to allocate for education, try to examine the things that are important to you as a family. It is important that the school you choose values the same things. If there are any conflicts of interest, your child may just end up confused about wrong and right. Ask for the Mission and Vision statements to ensure that academic and extra-curricular activities and policies are aligned. This will also allow you to guage how well administrators manage the school so that they, as well as the teaching staff, have a clear educational direction.

This may mean you have to check out a lot of schools but you do have a better chance with the private rather than public since private schools have more elbow room when it comes to policy implementation.

I hope my suggestions help you with school-hunting. May you find more peace and happiness in the Philippines.

:

--- Quote from: mandaluyong on January 12, 2011, 03:34:40 AM ---.....Ask for the Mission and Vision statements to ensure that academic and extra-curricular activities and policies are aligned. This will also allow you to guage how well administrators manage the school so that they, as well as the teaching staff, have a clear educational direction.

--- End quote ---

What they say and what they actually do can be two very different things.

We selected our daughters school mainly by locale, and budget. The school we wanted her to go to was $12,000 a year, and we simply cannot afford that.

Where she is now is not perfect, but appears adequate for what we want for her: a general decent broad based education.

mandaluyong:
As always, people will do things differently from what they say. Since there is no such thing as a perfect school, parents will have to do their share in educating their children. If parents simply could not afford an expensive private school, they could make up for it by setting a structured learning time and choosing appropriate materials. Philippine schools are still largely traditional so supplemental materials are not too hard to find.

Also, Philippine private schools that are PAASCU members are held more accountable to their Mission and Vision statements.

Again, hope this helps.

hhhsands:

--- Quote from: King Herald on January 12, 2011, 03:48:03 AM ---We selected our daughters school mainly by locale, and budget. The school we wanted her to go to was $12,000 a year, and we simply cannot afford that.

--- End quote ---

Wow! I teach in a private university and the enrollment fee is around 6,000 Eur/year; considering all expenses the total is probably below that number. A public university cost could be 30-50%

:

--- Quote from: mandaluyong on January 12, 2011, 05:13:04 AM ---As always, people will do things differently from what they say. Since there is no such thing as a perfect school, parents will have to do their share in educating their children. If parents simply could not afford an expensive private school, they could make up for it by setting a structured learning time and choosing appropriate materials. Philippine schools are still largely traditional so supplemental materials are not too hard to find.

Also, Philippine private schools that are PAASCU members are held more accountable to their Mission and Vision statements.

Again, hope this helps.

--- End quote ---

My daughter, who is nine, starts school at 07:15 and finishes at 15:00, which is a longer day than I ever did in England at school, even when I was 16.

She also brings home about two hours of homework, which I personally do not agree with/ There is no reason a nine year old should need that much extra work after her school day. We complained to the school about it, during a PTA meeting,  and they told us we are the first parents who have had a problem, but, several other parents then also stood up and agreed they too were not happy with it.

We have now enrolled our daughter in an after-school program that has teachers supervise the children doing their assignments in the school for an hour each day, four days a week.

I\'ve told the school that if she can\'t get it done in an hour, after a 7 3/4 hour school day, then it doesn\'t get done. Period.

And my wife has discretely  mentioned to the head teacher; \"if they were taught properly in school they wouldn\'t need so much homework\" :-X

One thing I find a little odd is the \'achievement\' awards/certificates that schools hand out to pupils who excel. It would appear that these are some sort of status symbol amongst certain parents in schools, and much sought after. That was one explanation for the excessive homework. Another parent pointed out to me that there have been court cases and law suits filed because children didn\'t get the awards their parents had decided they were entitled to.  ???

I\'ve told our daughters school that as long as she gets a good, well rounded education, I will be happy. I don\'t care about awards, certificates, medals and any other sort of status symbol.

\'Travel broadens the mind\', and one of the best things that ever happened to me during my school days was going to live in Singapore for three years. I sure hope my daughter finds her time in the Philippines as interesting and exciting as I did my years in Singapore.  ;D

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