Living in The Philippines > Education in the Philippines

Education In the Philippines, Good or Bad, Your honest opinion

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coleman2347:
I just sat down and read most of the post here, most seem to be old post.  I am presently putting 5 kids through school here, two of my own and three of my wife's siblings.  Recently I sat down with them trying to determine just how much education they had to begin with.

All five had been attending public school in the province,  ranging from kinder to 7th grade and frankly I was dismayed.  The one in first grade could not do simple addition (ie 1+1=2) and though he was adequate in his writing he had almost no knowledge of math.
The rest were about the same or worst.

The one bright spot was the oldest who had to quit school before he finished grammar school and is in the 7th grade this year..(he is 18 going back to school) and seems to be extremely bright.   Given the opportunity he will excel.

When we watch TV it seems that almost no one knows anything about the rest of the world except what they see on TV...Was watching a sci fi movie last night and was asked "is it real?" do we really have ships like that?  That's only the tip of the Iceberg, I watch a lot of Discovery and Nat.Geo and almost all of the time have to get the globe and show the kids where it is they are talking about. 

Yesterday I went to a parent/teachers meeting at the school I have them in now. its Catholic and private...I hate to be negative but honestly I have seen better presentations done by first graders in the states.  I was actually embarrassed for them.  This is suppose to be an English speaking school, they're English was like my Waray Waray and that's not saying a lot.  All of the teachers have MA or PhD's.  It seemed to me that the school was more interested in making "good citizens" (read followers) than making intelligent students.  It seems that they want to "dumb down" the courses they teach.  Supposedly this school has one of the highest ratings here and the curriculum goes from K though College. 

This is my first time of really getting into education for kids in 40 years so I am kind of at a lost of whats expected here..my hope and dream is to have all the kids college educated before I die...But frankly it would seem that a high school education in the States is more than a college education here?  Am I wrong?  Am I right?  I have no Idea...Any input from those of you more experienced in this than myself would be appreciated...Lee

Steve & Myrlita:

--- Quote from: coleman2347 on June 23, 2013, 01:30:41 PM ---Yesterday I went to a parent/teachers meeting at the school I have them in now. its Catholic and private...I hate to be negative but honestly I have seen better presentations done by first graders in the states.  I was actually embarrassed for them.  This is suppose to be an English speaking school, they're English was like my Waray Waray and that's not saying a lot.  All of the teachers have MA or PhD's.  It seemed to me that the school was more interested in making "good citizens" (read followers) than making intelligent students.  It seems that they want to "dumb down" the courses they teach.  Supposedly this school has one of the highest ratings here and the curriculum goes from K though College. 

This is my first time of really getting into education for kids in 40 years so I am kind of at a lost of whats expected here..my hope and dream is to have all the kids college educated before I die...But frankly it would seem that a high school education in the States is more than a college education here?  Am I wrong?  Am I right?  I have no Idea...Any input from those of you more experienced in this than myself would be appreciated...Lee

--- End quote ---
Yes Lee, it's not your imagination. IMHO, they purposely keep them dumbed down to keep the masses under control of the elites. I've met college graduates who could not even tell me where MA was on the globe or even name all the months in a year. To this day, I still scratch my head at the educational system here. My 13 almost 14 yr old granddaughter to this day can't speak English yet my 3 yr old just being around Grampy talks English to me regularly. The school's main drive is to push nationalism. Again JMHO. God Bless.....

Gray Wolf:
My experience has proven to me that even the highly educated have no sense of direction nor how to read basic map instructions.  I sent some old National Geographic magazines to the family in balikbayan boxes and they have become their windows to the rest of the world.  It's amazing how little is actually taught there, even in "good" schools.

fred:
My two kids were educated in the UK till they were 7 and 9 years old..
My eldest is now 16 and on his last year of high school here.
Alongside his education here he has spent the last two years doing a British IGSE course (Home study) He took one year out of local school to concentrate on this Brit course.(5 subjects)
We booked him into the British school in Manila to sit his exams and it seems he is very confident that has done well..
From what he tells me,the standards in English,Math and Science are similar in both systems. Obviously his test grades so far this year are excellent.
My daughter is not taking the IGCSE course and her general Maths,science and English are about the same as her brother.
Parental guidance and attention is essential.

JoeLP:
I think a lot has to do with what school the child attends.  My ex went to a top private school.  She then went to Chicago post graduation and when she went to apply and do a placement test at DePaul, she placed as a sophomore.  This was back in 1986.  Then her councilor set up a meeting where her dad(educated at USC in the '50s) and her had to talk about what she had to do to start school.  The councilor went on to tell her she needed to take English as a second language.  She was so pissed she spent the rest of the meeting correcting the councilor's poor speech each and every time he made a mistake not speaking proper English.  Her dad told me he didn't know if he should laugh, or scold her. He also was pretty upset and scorned that such a class was in demand.  Anyway, the councilor was pissed at the end, and refused to let her out of the class.  So she went to the University of Chicago. 
Now, forward to 2011.  The last time I was in the Phils.  My friend Maki lived in the USA up till 2009.  He had 3 kids all in the system of public schools here in the USA.  The daughter started and was in 5th grade, the boys were only in K for one,and the other not yet in school.  The live in Las Pinas and Maki and his wife put them into the Elizabeth Seton school system.  A private school.  The daughter was held back a grade.  The older son was now in 2nd grade level.  He blew me away with his education.  He would grab my books I brought to read, and for the most part, understood every word.  At that time I was reading the Lord Of The Rings books again.  He only had to ask what a few words were.  When Maki got home I said to him that he raised his kids well while they were in America.  His response was his wife and him never really taught them anything more than what the schools did.  They just helped with home work and it was the school that they attended in Las Pinas that taught them reading of both English and Tagalog books.  Then he told me that his boy can read an even higher level of Tagalog. 
I talked to my ex about this once.  Her view of schooling in Manila, based on what she saw in the '80s is this.  The public schools teaches girls to cook, clean, and do maid jobs.  She said most of those girls will not finish school, and they need to be trained to do the jobs that they will be at best qualified for.  The boys are taught more technical jobs for working in factories or other "handyman" jobs. 
Again, this is based on what she saw back in the '80s.  If this is still accurate is the big question. 

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