Philippines Insider" The Ultimate Philippines Travel Guide for Tourists and Expats
Philippines Insider" The Ultimate Philippines Travel Guide for Tourists and Expats

Author Topic: Average electric bill in the PI  (Read 5279 times)

  • Guest
Re: Average electric bill in the PI
« Reply #15 on: June 12, 2010, 10:08:24 PM »

Polished stainless steel anyone  ;) ;D

Colin

Well, you can buy it for a good price over there, in flat sheets, so might not be such a bad idea for a medium sized garden shed.

I\'ve noticed lots of newer houses in Singapore have ceramic roof tiles, in various (usually dark) colours, but they have a real shiny glaze on them. Very attractive to the eye, and I guess they reflect heat too?

Something like these:


Offline richardsinger

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Re: Average electric bill in the PI
« Reply #16 on: June 13, 2010, 08:34:14 PM »
In the company I work for in Singapore, we sometimes need to work in temporary offices made from a 20ft shipping container. And the contained is exposed to the hot sun all day. To reduce the load on the aircon the container is usually fitted with a corrugated roof that is open all round. It basically just acts as a sunshade to stop the direct sunlight from hitting the top of the container. It\'s very effective. Wonder if you could put something like that on a house?

Richard

  • Guest
Re: Average electric bill in the PI
« Reply #17 on: June 13, 2010, 10:22:44 PM »
In the company I work for in Singapore, we sometimes need to work in temporary offices made from a 20ft shipping container. And the contained is exposed to the hot sun all day. To reduce the load on the aircon the container is usually fitted with a corrugated roof that is open all round. It basically just acts as a sunshade to stop the direct sunlight from hitting the top of the container. It\'s very effective. Wonder if you could put something like that on a house?

Richard
Well, that\'s exactly what I suggested I might do for my workshop.  ;D

One barrier to reflect/divert the heat, and a decent air gap to disperse any heat that does make it through. It truly baffles me why so many houses in the PI seem to have that air space sealed, into a furnace.

Whereabouts do you work in Singapore? I once lived near Changi village and worked inside Loyang supply base, and also down the Changi yacht club, but that was twenty years ago.

Is Peoples Plaza/park(?) still the big Filipino Sunday hangout?  ;)

Offline graham

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Re: Average electric bill in the PI
« Reply #18 on: June 13, 2010, 10:52:40 PM »
In the company I work for in Singapore, we sometimes need to work in temporary offices made from a 20ft shipping container. And the contained is exposed to the hot sun all day. To reduce the load on the aircon the container is usually fitted with a corrugated roof that is open all round. It basically just acts as a sunshade to stop the direct sunlight from hitting the top of the container. It\'s very effective. Wonder if you could put something like that on a house?

Richard

Back in the 2nd world war British built Land Rovers that were used in desert warfare were fitted with an ancillary roof, just like you described above. The were just called a \"tropical roof\"

Graham

Offline Brisbane

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Re: Average electric bill in the PI
« Reply #19 on: June 14, 2010, 12:59:44 AM »
My guess on having a raised roof or a gap would depend a lot on where you live in the Philippines. A strong hurricane would surely get into your roof space and deposit the remains of your house several kilometers away.

  • Guest
Re: Average electric bill in the PI
« Reply #20 on: June 14, 2010, 01:59:26 AM »
My guess on having a raised roof or a gap would depend a lot on where you live in the Philippines. A strong hurricane would surely get into your roof space and deposit the remains of your house several kilometers away.
Roofs get ripped off because they don\'t have air flow underneath, much the way an airplane wing gives lift.

If you have the same wind speed under your roof as above it the wind just passes through, leaving it alone, but if the wind is high enough it\'ll take the whole house regardless of your gaps.

Offline richardsinger

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Re: Average electric bill in the PI
« Reply #21 on: June 14, 2010, 07:51:01 AM »

Whereabouts do you work in Singapore? I once lived near Changi village and worked inside Loyang supply base, and also down the Changi yacht club, but that was twenty years ago.

Is Peoples Plaza/park(?) still the big Filipino Sunday hangout?  ;)

I\'m working at the old airport in Paya Lebar. I sometimes go out to Changi for recreation. It\'s changed quite a lot in the past 20 years, but it\'s still a nice place to visit at the weekend.

The Filipinos seem to hang out mainly at Lucky Plaza every Sunday. Yes there are still some at People\'s Park but Lucky Plaza is always very crowded with young girls shopping, sending money back home and basically just enjoying the free aircon.

Richard

Offline Knowdafish

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Re: Average electric bill in the PI
« Reply #22 on: June 14, 2010, 03:46:14 PM »
My guess on having a raised roof or a gap would depend a lot on where you live in the Philippines. A strong hurricane would surely get into your roof space and deposit the remains of your house several kilometers away.
Roofs get ripped off because they don\'t have air flow underneath, much the way an airplane wing gives lift.

If you have the same wind speed under your roof as above it the wind just passes through, leaving it alone, but if the wind is high enough it\'ll take the whole house regardless of your gaps.

True! In order to have lift you have to have a DIFFERENCE in pressure from one side to the other.

Offline Knowdafish

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Re: Average electric bill in the PI
« Reply #23 on: June 14, 2010, 03:49:59 PM »
In the company I work for in Singapore, we sometimes need to work in temporary offices made from a 20ft shipping container. And the contained is exposed to the hot sun all day. To reduce the load on the aircon the container is usually fitted with a corrugated roof that is open all round. It basically just acts as a sunshade to stop the direct sunlight from hitting the top of the container. It\'s very effective. Wonder if you could put something like that on a house?

Richard


Back in the 2nd world war British built Land Rovers that were used in desert warfare were fitted with an ancillary roof, just like you described above. The were just called a \"tropical roof\"

Graham


In Mexico it is called a palapa and is very common and works great!

http://www.google.com.ph/images?q=palapa&oe=utf-8&rls=org.mozilla:en-US:official&client=firefox-a&um=1&ie=UTF-8&source=og&sa=N&hl=tl&tab=wi

  • Guest
Re: Average electric bill in the PI
« Reply #24 on: June 14, 2010, 08:23:30 PM »


I\'m working at the old airport in Paya Lebar. I sometimes go out to Changi for recreation. It\'s changed quite a lot in the past 20 years, but it\'s still a nice place to visit at the weekend.

The Filipinos seem to hang out mainly at Lucky Plaza every Sunday. Yes there are still some at People\'s Park but Lucky Plaza is always very crowded with young girls shopping, sending money back home and basically just enjoying the free aircon.

Richard
That\'s the one, Lucky Plaza, on Orchard road.  I used to go there occasionally with the girls from the band that used to play in Millies nightclub in Changi village, before it was turned into a hawker centre. There\'s a bunch of restaurants up there top selling Filipino food and all.

Is Peyton Place still there, underground at the back of Orchard Towers? That was the place for a good Filipino tea dance on a Sunday afternoon, half price beer, loads of friendly girls etc. There was also an underground Filipino place opposite Hard Rock Cafe, on Sunday afternoons, forget the name.