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UK NHS

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Colin:
I would advise any Brit moving permamantly to the Philippines not to break their connection with the NHS. If you go back later for treatment you may be asked to pay. It seems that we were accepted because we are fully paid and both receive a government pensions, but we were asked about our status several times and had to put it in writing.

Colin:

--- Quote from: Colin on January 02, 2016, 03:42:29 AM ---I would advise any Brit moving permamantly to the Philippines not to break their connection with the NHS. If you go back later for treatment you may be asked to pay. It seems that we were accepted because we are fully paid and both receive a government pensions, but we were asked about our status several times and had to put it in writing.

--- End quote ---

Correction, it seems that were  accepted because I stated that we were planning to rent property which we then did. Initially when we were staying with my daughter the GP accepted us but told us that we may have to pay.

codefreeze:
The rules were changed some time back and there was some heated discussion about this on this forum. I would have to dig out what the rules now are. But yes, you need to be wary and make sure you have the latest info if you moved to Phils, but come back to UK for treatment etc.

Peter:

--- Quote from: codefreeze on March 06, 2019, 08:09:12 PM ---The rules were changed some time back and there was some heated discussion about this on this forum. I would have to dig out what the rules now are. But yes, you need to be wary and make sure you have the latest info if you moved to Phils, but come back to UK for treatment etc.

--- End quote ---

Last time I checked (last year) the basic rule was, if you have been resident overseas, when you "return on a permanent basis", you have to wait 6 months from date of arrival, before you can use the NHS for free.

A&E and Casualty are, of course, always free during the 6 months, as you will be classed as a visitor/tourist and thus entitled, but GP visits, consultations, treatment and referrals must be paid for.

Really depends on how honest you are in declaring your status, but the cost of being caught is not something to take lightly, IMHO of course!

Peter

David690:
In April 2015, changes were made to way that the NHS charges overseas visitors for NHS hospital care.  These changes also affect some former UK residents of the UK, who may be required to pay for their hospital treatment costs while in England.  Free NHS is provided on the basis of the person being ordinarily resident.  It dose not depend on nationality, paying taxes, national insurance contributions, being registered with a GP, having a NHS number, or owning property in UK.  People who live outside of EEA, including former UK residents should make sure they are covered by a personal healthcare insurance.  Anyone who does not have insurance will be charged at 150% of the NHS national tariff for any care they receive.
Citizens who return to UK on a settled basis will be classed as ordinarily resident and will be entitled to free NHS care immediately.

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