Living In The Philippines Forum

Living in The Philippines => Immigration,Visas to stay in the Philippines => Topic started by: Gray Wolf on July 31, 2014, 02:02:45 AM

Title: Visa Types
Post by: Gray Wolf on July 31, 2014, 02:02:45 AM
Some day a bright person will do out here a full list of visa types and codes with a short (very) explanation of what each means. Just a simple database listing the codes etc. Like many here I just can't get my head around all the alternatives!  :-\ ??? :( :'(
It's the age thing!


Philippines Visas

Non-Immigrant

9(A)    Pleasure, business or health
9(B)    Transit
9(C)    Seaman on a ship docking in a port of entry in the Philippines
9(D)    Alien businessman
9(E)    Foreign government officials and their dependents, assistants and employees
9(F)    Students
9(G)    Pre-arranged employees and their dependents

Immigrant
   
13    Quota immigrants, of which no more than fifty of any one nationality or without nationality may be admitted within one calendar year. Immigrants who are issued Section 13 visas belonging to one of the seven listed sub-categories under CA 613 are considered non-quota immigrants, and may be admitted despite the quota.
13(A)    The spouse or unmarried child (below 21) of a Filipino citizen.
13(B)    Children born during a temporary visit abroad to mothers granted permanent residence in the Philippines.
13(C)    Children born after the issuance of the visa of the accompanying parent.
13(D)    Women who lost Filipino citizenship by virtue of marriage to a foreign spouse, and her unmarried children
13(E)    Permanent residents returning to the Philippines from a temporary visit abroad to resume permanent residence.
13(F)    A natural-born citizen of the Philippines, who has been naturalized in a foreign country, and is returning to the Philippines for permanent residence, including his spouse and minor unmarried children.
13(G)    Natural-born Filipinos and their dependents who have naturalized in a foreign country and wish to permanently reside in the Philippines. This visa was provided for under Republic Act No. 4376, passed in 1965.

Special
   
SIRV[5]    Special Investor's Resident Visa. This is a non-immigrant visa granted to foreign nationals and their dependents who have shareholdings in Philippine corporations engaged in the manufacturing or services sectors, involved in projects listed under the Investment Priority Plan, or are listed on the Philippine Stock Exchange. This visa is issued by the BI in coordination with the Board of Investments.
SVEG[6]    Special Visa for Employment Generation. This is a non-immigrant visa granted to foreign nationals and their dependents who employ at least ten Filipinos in a lawful enterprise or business venture.
SRRV[7]    Special Resident Retiree's Visa. This is a non-immigrant visa granted to foreign nationals and their dependents who wish to retire in the Philippines. This visa is issued by the BI in coordination with the Philippine Retirement Authority.
SEVOBU[8]    Special Employment Visa for Offshore Banking Unit. This is a non-immigrant visa granted to foreign nationals and their dependents who are employed by the Philippine offshore units of foreign banks.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Visa_policy_of_the_Philippines (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Visa_policy_of_the_Philippines)
Title: Re: Visa Types
Post by: rubydave on September 03, 2014, 01:43:19 PM
Some day a bright person will do out here a full list of visa types and codes with a short (very) explanation of what each means. Just a simple database listing the codes etc. Like many here I just can't get my head around all the alternatives!  :-\ ??? :( :'(
It's the age thing!


Philippines Visas

Non-Immigrant

9(A)    Pleasure, business or health
9(B)    Transit
9(C)    Seaman on a ship docking in a port of entry in the Philippines
9(D)    Alien businessman
9(E)    Foreign government officials and their dependents, assistants and employees
9(F)    Students
9(G)    Pre-arranged employees and their dependents

Immigrant
   
13    Quota immigrants, of which no more than fifty of any one nationality or without nationality may be admitted within one calendar year. Immigrants who are issued Section 13 visas belonging to one of the seven listed sub-categories under CA 613 are considered non-quota immigrants, and may be admitted despite the quota.
13(A)    The spouse or unmarried child (below 21) of a Filipino citizen.
13(B)    Children born during a temporary visit abroad to mothers granted permanent residence in the Philippines.
13(C)    Children born after the issuance of the visa of the accompanying parent.
13(D)    Women who lost Filipino citizenship by virtue of marriage to a foreign spouse, and her unmarried children
13(E)    Permanent residents returning to the Philippines from a temporary visit abroad to resume permanent residence.
13(F)    A natural-born citizen of the Philippines, who has been naturalized in a foreign country, and is returning to the Philippines for permanent residence, including his spouse and minor unmarried children.
13(G)    Natural-born Filipinos and their dependents who have naturalized in a foreign country and wish to permanently reside in the Philippines. This visa was provided for under Republic Act No. 4376, passed in 1965.

Special
   
SIRV[5]    Special Investor's Resident Visa. This is a non-immigrant visa granted to foreign nationals and their dependents who have shareholdings in Philippine corporations engaged in the manufacturing or services sectors, involved in projects listed under the Investment Priority Plan, or are listed on the Philippine Stock Exchange. This visa is issued by the BI in coordination with the Board of Investments.
SVEG[6]    Special Visa for Employment Generation. This is a non-immigrant visa granted to foreign nationals and their dependents who employ at least ten Filipinos in a lawful enterprise or business venture.
SRRV[7]    Special Resident Retiree's Visa. This is a non-immigrant visa granted to foreign nationals and their dependents who wish to retire in the Philippines. This visa is issued by the BI in coordination with the Philippine Retirement Authority.
SEVOBU[8]    Special Employment Visa for Offshore Banking Unit. This is a non-immigrant visa granted to foreign nationals and their dependents who are employed by the Philippine offshore units of foreign banks.

[url]http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Visa_policy_of_the_Philippines[/url] ([url]http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Visa_policy_of_the_Philippines[/url])



There is "Non-Quota" visa which is available also for Foreign citizens married to Filipino ...This Non-Quota visa gives an automatic permanent residency to foreign citizens ...This is the easy option for foreign citizens (married to Filipino) who want to live in the Philippines permanently and I think this is renewable every 5 years.
Title: Re: Visa Types
Post by: Art, just a re(tired) Fil-Am on September 03, 2014, 01:54:03 PM
It's already listed on the OP, under immigrat qouta available also as a nonimmigart qouta.
Title: Re: Visa Types
Post by: iamjames on September 03, 2014, 02:52:25 PM
Thanks Gray. I'll have to consider the options. Marriage is the easy one but only as a last resort!
Title: Re: Visa Types
Post by: Art, just a re(tired) Fil-Am on September 03, 2014, 03:26:54 PM
What is not mentioned on the list is the Special SRRV for the U.S. retired military who have at least served a tour of duty in the Philippines for at least 2 years and the bank security deposit is only $1,500 compared to the regular $10,000 deposit!
Title: Re: Visa Types
Post by: coleman2347 on September 03, 2014, 05:49:44 PM
If I remember correctly, which I may not, on the retirement visa the deposited money amount changes with age
Title: Re: Visa Types
Post by: fred on September 03, 2014, 06:31:49 PM
Quote

There is "Non-Quota" visa which is available also for Foreign citizens married to Filipino ...This Non-Quota visa gives an automatic permanent residency to foreign citizens ...This is the easy option for foreign citizens (married to Filipino) who want to live in the Philippines permanently and I think this is renewable every 5 years.


Yes,the 13a non quota visa is permanent when applied for in a Philippine embassy overseas.
The only thing that needs renewing every five years is the ACR card.
The visa is permanent!
Title: Re: Visa Types
Post by: FMSINC on September 03, 2014, 07:58:06 PM
until she divorces you
Title: Re: Visa Types
Post by: Lee2 on September 03, 2014, 08:21:30 PM
until she divorces you

Cruel but probably sometimes true, luckily not in my case since the wife has already put up with me for 20 years. So then my question would be, does a person on a 13a have to convert back to a tourist visa or leave? We go and stay each year on a Balikbayan stamp but I had considered a 13a or an SRRV in the past and never considered what might happen in case of divorce or God forbid the death of a spouse?
Title: Re: Visa Types
Post by: FMSINC on September 03, 2014, 08:36:40 PM
I believe you have the right to apply for a tourist visa but only if your separation is friendly

This seldom happens, as there is no divorce here they usually try to charge you with abuse or adultery in the complaint then you may well be on your way to prison before the long trip home better be sure you marry the right person

Since I lived here this has happened to 3 expats I have known
Title: Re: Visa Types
Post by: fred on September 03, 2014, 10:49:57 PM
until she divorces you

No divorce in the Philippines!
Title: Re: Visa Types
Post by: fred on September 03, 2014, 10:53:29 PM
I believe you have the right to apply for a tourist visa but only if your separation is friendly

This seldom happens, as there is no divorce here they usually try to charge you with abuse or adultery in the complaint then you may well be on your way to prison before the long trip home better be sure you marry the right person

Since I lived here this has happened to 3 expats I have known

Im not so sure that this is what they usually do.. I`m sure it happens occasionally .. Just not usually IMO.
Title: Re: Visa Types
Post by: coleman2347 on September 04, 2014, 02:11:24 AM
Ok, so today I finally got all the paper work together for the 13a, when Maline and I went to extend my tourist visa I showed it to the folks there, and they made an appointment for us to come back next week as the head person will be out of town until next week.  They said the paper work was good and I needed to bring 10k php for the application..if its as simple as that, I will save the 10k in the first 5 months....
Now my question, If Maline predeceased me, which is very unlikely,  would the 13a still be good?
Title: Re: Visa Types
Post by: fred on September 04, 2014, 08:38:20 AM
Coleman.. If my wife  predeceased me (God forbid) I would be the last person to volunteer that information to the B.I.
I have checked the B.I website and cant find anything that would require me to do so..

Title: Re: Visa Types
Post by: coleman2347 on September 04, 2014, 11:06:39 AM
I will find out, I have friends here that are BI, actually my bday is soon and they are coming over, I can probably find out over a couple of red horse.
I agree with you, why would they have to know, but for me here, Im sure it would get out..you know the Philippines...nothing stays secret for long.
I think if you have a will its legal for you to keep the land but not positive, Maline predeceasing me is not something I want to think about. But we live in a real world, she is always out on her scooter and the way people drive here anything is possible
Title: Re: Visa Types
Post by: meylou on September 04, 2014, 03:00:10 PM
I will find out, I have friends here that are BI, actually my bday is soon and they are coming over, I can probably find out over a couple of red horse.
I agree with you, why would they have to know, but for me here, Im sure it would get out..you know the Philippines...nothing stays secret for long.
I think if you have a will its legal for you to keep the land but not positive, Maline predeceasing me is not something I want to think about. But we live in a real world, she is always out on her scooter and the way people drive here anything is possible

I'd be interested to know the answer to this issue. My husband did ask me about this as well.
Thank you.
Title: Re: Visa Types
Post by: codefreeze on November 06, 2015, 11:28:21 PM
Interesting little thread.

I knew about the SRRV - compared to what Thailand and Malaysia offer it is frankly quite attractive - long may it continue! :)

Hadn't thought of the 13A marriage visa. Partner (filipina) and I have been together for nearly ten years now, and I suspect we'll be together until we die, so that is something to consider. Possibly no advantage to that over the SRRV though? We are quite happy not married right now! :)

My plan is to initially go to Phils for a year full-time to see how things work out. I'm thinking I could get the 59 day tourist visa here, and then renew in country. Does that sound reasonable?

Is it possible to get a tourist visa that allows a one year stay without having to get renewals?

Title: Re: Visa Types
Post by: Lee2 on November 06, 2015, 11:40:30 PM
Interesting little thread.

I knew about the SRRV - compared to what Thailand and Malaysia offer it is frankly quite attractive - long may it continue! :)

Hadn't thought of the 13A marriage visa. Partner (filipina) and I have been together for nearly ten years now, and I suspect we'll be together until we die, so that is something to consider. Possibly no advantage to that over the SRRV though? We are quite happy not married right now! :)

My plan is to initially go to Phils for a year full-time to see how things work out. I'm thinking I could get the 59 day tourist visa here, and then renew in country. Does that sound reasonable?

Is it possible to get a tourist visa that allows a one year stay without having to get renewals?

The Philippines now has the long stay visa for tourists and I believe that a tourist can now stay up to 36 months total on visa renewals.
LONG-STAY VISITOR VISA EXTENSION (LSVVE) http://tinyurl.com/ox8hdh2 (http://tinyurl.com/ox8hdh2)

Who can apply?
All temporary visitors, regardless of nationality and not otherwise disqualified, who wish to extend his/her tourist visa during the last thirty (30) days of the previously issued LSVVE, or upon the expiry of a regular visa extension.  The total duration of extension shall be not more than six (6) months from the time of expiration of authorized stay. 
Title: Re: Visa Types
Post by: codefreeze on November 07, 2015, 12:07:09 AM
Thank you, that is very useful. It looks like it is reasonably priced too. Safely bookmarked. Thanks again for the quick response!
Title: Re: Visa Types
Post by: M.C.A. on November 07, 2015, 07:16:39 AM
Quote

There is "Non-Quota" visa which is available also for Foreign citizens married to Filipino ...This Non-Quota visa gives an automatic permanent residency to foreign citizens ...This is the easy option for foreign citizens (married to Filipino) who want to live in the Philippines permanently and I think this is renewable every 5 years.


Yes,the 13a non quota visa is permanent when applied for in a Philippine embassy overseas.
The only thing that needs renewing every five years is the ACR card.
The visa is permanent!


Fred what happens though to the Visa stamp in the US Passport when your US Passport expires?  My Passport will expire next year in July and my 13a Immigrant Card is due for renewal in January.  What are the procedures, will the new passport get another Visa whole page placement?  Will they ask for the passport?   
Title: Re: Visa Types
Post by: bigrod on November 07, 2015, 08:38:50 PM
Quote

There is "Non-Quota" visa which is available also for Foreign citizens married to Filipino ...This Non-Quota visa gives an automatic permanent residency to foreign citizens ...This is the easy option for foreign citizens (married to Filipino) who want to live in the Philippines permanently and I think this is renewable every 5 years.



Yes,the 13a non quota visa is permanent when applied for in a Philippine embassy overseas.
The only thing that needs renewing every five years is the ACR card.
The visa is permanent!



Fred what happens though to the Visa stamp in the US Passport when your US Passport expires?  My Passport will expire next year in July and my 13a Immigrant Card is due for renewal in January.  What are the procedures, will the new passport get another Visa whole page placement?  Will they ask for the passport?   


Mcalleyboy,

You would renew your ACR card in January, then apply for a new passport prior to July.  Then you have the option of carry two passports to the BI for any action with them and also for travel to and from the RP, or have BI transfer the stamps to your new passport so you only have to carry one passport.  Your new passport will not even have an entry stamp unless you have it transferred.  Probably would use this form to get it done:  http://www.immigration.gov.ph/images/FORMS/VariousApplicationsForms/2014-10-004%20Rev%200%20Application%20For%20Transfer%20or%20Correction%20Form.pdf (http://www.immigration.gov.ph/images/FORMS/VariousApplicationsForms/2014-10-004%20Rev%200%20Application%20For%20Transfer%20or%20Correction%20Form.pdf)

Chuck
Title: Re: Visa Types
Post by: M.C.A. on November 09, 2015, 09:54:26 AM
Thank you Chuck that was real helpful for me, I guess I'm a little worried about being told to renew my passport in January but it doesn't expire till July, hopefully I won't need to do this and just be able to get my Immigrant card renewal completed, I wonder what the cost is on that now? 
Title: Re: Visa Types
Post by: bigrod on November 09, 2015, 10:46:35 AM
The immigration card renewal will cost you $50 peso equivalent, plus 500 express lane fee, plus since u are talking 310 php for annual registration.

Chuck
Title: Re: Visa Types
Post by: Lee2 on November 09, 2015, 10:53:53 AM
Thank you Chuck that was real helpful for me, I guess I'm a little worried about being told to renew my passport in January but it doesn't expire till July, hopefully I won't need to do this and just be able to get my Immigrant card renewal completed, I wonder what the cost is on that now?

I do not know if this would help or not but there was an article I posted about passports less than 6 months old now being allowed, so they should also allow you and others to have a passport due in less than 6 months.
 http://www.livinginthephilippines.com/forum/index.php?topic=50406.0 (http://www.livinginthephilippines.com/forum/index.php?topic=50406.0)
Title: Re: Visa Types
Post by: M.C.A. on November 09, 2015, 05:10:03 PM
The immigration card renewal will cost you $50 peso equivalent, plus 500 express lane fee, plus since u are talking 310 php for annual registration.

Chuck

Thanks again Chuck I appreciate the information.     :D
Title: Re: Visa Types
Post by: M.C.A. on November 09, 2015, 05:12:18 PM
Lee2 Thanks for this again, yes this is what helped me initially and took away some anxiety because I live so far from Manila and to travel back and forth, costs of renting a van and then later on dealing with the US Embassy.  I feel so much better about the renewal this year and then the following 4 years after I can drive myself to Sta Rosa for my yearly check-in's.     :)