Living in The Philippines > Getting here and back and getting items here and back

Mail forwarding and address.

(1/5) > >>

MadDog:
Many thanks to you all, it is wonderful to read your writings, watch your video and have someone who really understands my plans. A real blast of fresh air after many years of breathing social smog.
For my next question I am going ask about a US address. Letís say I moved permanently to the Philippines. I have no one in the states to have an address with and want to sell my home so I stop spending all the money to keep it up. What can I do? Are these mail forwarding services enough for my important accounts and maintaining my US citizenship?

Lee2:

--- Quote from: MadDog on March 12, 2018, 09:49:45 AM ---Many thanks to you all, it is wonderful to read your writings, watch your video and have someone who really understands my plans. A real blast of fresh air after many years of breathing social smog.
For my next question I am going ask about a US address. Letís say I moved permanently to the Philippines. I have no one in the states to have an address with and want to sell my home so I stop spending all the money to keep it up. What can I do? Are these mail forwarding services enough for my important accounts and maintaining my US citizenship?

--- End quote ---

https://www.usabox.com/ in Miami is one that a lot of people I have met along the way use but there are many others.

As far as keeping your citizenship, that is not an issue, you do not have to have a U.S. address for that but for banks and credit cards you usually need a U.S. address and U.S. phone number, one phone I recommend and have been using for years is Magic Jack, nowadays I use the Magic Jack app on my android phone more than the device but the device also comes in handy when living anywhere full time.

For a bank I recommend Charles Schwab and Fidelity both of which you should use a U.S. address for and maybe also to keep most of your dollars and maybe investments in, both for now reimburse all ATM fees and the exchange rate one gets here by using a Philippine ATM machine has been reasonable.

BudM:

--- Quote from: MadDog on March 12, 2018, 09:49:45 AM ---Many thanks to you all, it is wonderful to read your writings, watch your video and have someone who really understands my plans. A real blast of fresh air after many years of breathing social smog.
For my next question I am going ask about a US address. Letís say I moved permanently to the Philippines. I have no one in the states to have an address with and want to sell my home so I stop spending all the money to keep it up. What can I do? Are these mail forwarding services enough for my important accounts and maintaining my US citizenship?

--- End quote ---

As previously mentioned, you don't need a US address for maintaining citizenship.  But yeah, banks will normally require an address.  I have a private mailbox with a company in Florida.  I don't own anything back there but have that address which includes a street address.  It acts as an actual address, not a P.O. Box and is perfectly legal to declare residency in the state of Florida.  And the banks know it is a PMB.  If you get one, I would get one of them in one of the few states without a state income tax.  IRS and SSS send any hard copy of my mail, if any, to the Philippines but any 1099 has Florida for my stateside residence.  For sure I would not have NY listed.  I lived in Florida most of my life but previous residency is not required to declare there.  There are about a half a dozen states with no income tax.  Texas being another.

MadDog:
OK, let me get this straight. Of course I keep my citizenship. I can find a mail forward company that uses a street address in a state with no income tax. I can use this address for all my important stuff, then sell the house. The mail forward company is my US address for all my important stuff. Is this right?? If so, is there any possible problems with this?

lost_in_samoa:

--- Quote from: MadDog on March 14, 2018, 05:49:44 AM ---If so, is there any possible problems with this?
--- End quote ---

I looked into this a few years back.  What I found was that states have different residency benchmarks.

If you don't meet those then you default back to your state of birth for legal matters.


Hope this helps.

Navigation

[0] Message Index

[#] Next page

Go to full version