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Author Topic: Mobiles calling landlines  (Read 31224 times)

Offline robbie_d

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Mobiles calling landlines
« on: June 01, 2019, 01:38:14 PM »
Hi,

My "internet gf" (LOL rolls eyes) tells me that she can't call a local PH landline with her mobile phone.
What's up with that, please?

In Montreal, where i am, a phone is a phone - phones can call other phones.
She says "I can't call that number because i am using a mobile."
I think she said her phone is a 4k phone.

Can anyone shine some light on this, please?
I don't get what she is saying.
Does it cost extra? Why can't a mobile call a local landline? 

Besides, i am not a cell phone owner. I, personally, do not like that technology.


I found this on the net:
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Phone Codes
For domestic long-distance calls or calls to mobile numbers, dial 0 followed by the city code (or mobile prefix) and then the seven-digit number.

Useful dialling codes from landlines include:

Philippines country code 63

International dialling code 00

PLDT directory 101171

International operator 108

Domestic operator 109

Land Lines
The Philippine Long-Distance Telephone Company (PLDT) operates the Philippines’ fixed-line network. International calls can be made from any PLDT office for US$0.40 per minute. Local calls cost almost nothing, and long-distance domestic calls are also very reasonable.

Mobile Phones
Mobile (cell) phones are found everywhere, and half the country spends much of its time furiously texting the other half. Local SIM cards are widely available and can be loaded up cheaply with data and phone credit. Roaming is possible but expensive.

More Information
Prepaid SIM cards cost as little as P40 and come pre-loaded with about the same amount of text credits.
The two companies with the best national coverage are Globe (www.globe.com.ph) and Smart (www.smart.com.ph).
Text messages on all mobile networks cost P1 to P2 per message; local calls cost P7.50 per minute (less if calling within a mobile network).
International text messages cost P15, and international calls cost US$0.40 per minute.
To dial a landline or mobile number from a mobile phone dial 0 or +63 followed by the three-digit prefix and the seven-digit number.
Mobile prefixes always begin with a 9 (eg 917, 906)
.
Roaming with your home phone is another, though likely very expensive, option.

Phonecards
PLDT cards such as ‘Budget’ (for international calls), ‘Pwede’ and ‘Touch’ cards can be used to make calls from any PLDT landline or from card-operated PLDT phones located in hotel foyers, commercial centres and shopping malls. Calls to the US using the Budget card cost only P3 per minute; other international destinations cost slightly more. Pwede and Touch cards allow dirt-cheap domestic calls from any PLDT landline or payphone.

INTERNET ACCESS
Theoretically, wi-fi and 4G internet access is available in much of the Philippines. However, the reality is a different story. It's frequently not working, intermittent or very slow, especially in the provinces (Palawan being the poster child for dysfunctional wi-fi).

That huge caveat aside, most hotels, cafes and restaurants in touristy areas and provincial centres provide free wi-fi.

For smartphone users, local SIM cards with data (4G) are easy to purchase, and data is cheap at less than P50 per day.

Not travelling with a computer? You can still find internet cafes in most decent-sized cities. Business hotels and an increasing number of boutique hotels and hostels have computers for guests to use.

POST
On average, it takes two weeks or so for mail sent from the Philippines to reach the North America or Europe. Mail sent from abroad to the Philippines is slower and less reliable and you're better off sending via FedEx or UPS.
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Thanks
 

Offline Steve & Myrlita

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  • Myrlita & I and all of our grandchildren.
Re: Mobiles calling landlines
« Reply #1 on: June 01, 2019, 01:48:21 PM »
Can't call local? Yes a familiar question but I know the solution.
When Filipinos try to call the local number, it doesn't go through because they tend to dial only the 7 digit number. Don't forget, cell phones in the Philippines use their own city (Area) codes like 0928 (Smart). If for example in Bacolod they want to call 434-0000, the would need to precede the number with the area code 034 so they need to dial 034-434-0000. Of course if you live in another area like Cebu the code is 032 and so forth. I hope this helps.
Thank you...God Bless...
Bro Steve & Sis Myrlita
Bacolod City, PH
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Offline User444

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Re: Mobiles calling landlines
« Reply #2 on: June 01, 2019, 02:21:25 PM »
It could depend on the package she has from the carrier. She may have free calls to phones within her network, but if she calls another network, there is an added price per minute that she doesn't want to pay. Maybe she can tell the landline is with another carrier? Or she's not dialing the full number with the area code?
Never argue with an idiot who provides false information. First, they will bring you down to their level and then beat you with experience.

Offline M.C.A.

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Re: Mobiles calling landlines
« Reply #3 on: June 01, 2019, 03:07:21 PM »
The Manila area added another digit and I forgot what it was but in order to call Manila and surrounding area from outside the region you have to dial 02 then the exit digit (?) and then the phone number but it sounds like she will need you to add more credit to her account.
My views would be from someone who lives out in the province close to in-laws on a pension.  Norwegian and French heritage.

Offline Peter

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Re: Mobiles calling landlines
« Reply #4 on: June 01, 2019, 04:12:20 PM »
I'm with User444 and MCA on this.

Networks providers will allow you to call everywhere/anywhere in the Philippines, if you have the correct area codes. But it will cost BIG BUCKS to call across providers, and even more to call a landline from a mobile.

You can call international as long as you're as rich as Daddy Warbucks.

Most folks I know, utilise Promo packages, with which they can call unlimited (Unli) on their own provider. Some have promos to call across networks. ie Smart to Globe, or Smart to PLDT landlines. You get the picture.

Promos have limited life, depending on how much you want to pay. Some 24 hours, some 3 days, some 7 etc. etc..

It costs money to call everywhere, so most will go 'unli' on their own network, unless they have an urgent need.

I refuse to call outside my Smart network, as the "load" just disappears "toot sweet!" It sucks away quicker than an acid drop sucks your cheeks in! (Old fashioned British sweetie - aka candy.)

Peter
Noli nothis permittere te terere.
Virtus autem corruptibilis est,
summa virtute prorsus corrumpitur,

Offline suzukig1

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Re: Mobiles calling landlines
« Reply #5 on: June 01, 2019, 09:53:48 PM »
Metro Manila landline phone numbers changed this year.  They are 8 digit numbers now and not 7 digit numbers.  Each landline phone company has their own new prefix.  So if you call the old 7 digit number it won't connect.  You still dial the same except using the new 8 digit number instead of the 7 digit number.

+63 X XXX-XXXX

02 X XXX-XXXX

Offline robbie_d

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Re: Mobiles calling landlines
« Reply #6 on: June 02, 2019, 12:35:54 AM »
Hi guys,

Well, well, doesn't THAT sound complicated to any of you?
They sell people phones which can't call all phones unless you BUY extra "data" or whatever it is you need over there.

As far as i know, EVERY city has a different area code.
In Montreal, for example, we have 514, 438, and 450 area codes and WE can call each one without having to pay extra.
Some of the 450 numbers are long distance because they are off the island and are out or range.
And even at that distance, the area codes usually change completely.

So, what Steve is saying is confusing to me about cities (or the actual phone itself??) having their own area codes.
Does that mean an Olongapo person's mobile phone in Olongapo has a code which allows calls within Olongapo to be (almost) free, but as soon as the person wants to (looking at a map) call someone in Morong, that it's going to cost MORE money than a local Olongapo call because the area codes of the cities are different?... or as Steve said the "area code in the PHONE" is different? 
When Filipinos try to call the local number, it doesn't go through because they tend to dial only the 7 digit number. Don't forget, cell phones in the Philippines use their own city (Area) codes like 0928 (Smart).

 If for example in Bacolod they want to call 434-0000, the would need to precede the number with the area code 034 so they need to dial 034-434-0000. Of course if you live in another area like Cebu the code is 032 and so forth. I hope this helps.
Steve's response is similar to User444's comments because they both mention dialing the correct codes and phone numbers.

See my quote below, please.
What if she dials the correct number?... will her mobile then be able to contact a landline phone?
 
It's a different world over there - for sure. This, to me, is like an episode of The Twilight Zone where you buy an electric stove but you have to rent the knobs.
Or you buy a car but you're charged so many PHPs very time you turn the steering wheel.
Reminds of Mr. Haney from Green Acres.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5KaAO56WTe8

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(Useless but maybe interesting information)
I gave up my landline several years ago, and i refuse to own a cell because i don't like wireless technology. My computer uses a cable into the wall - no WIFI for me.
I can't be bothered paying for phones - i just save the money.
My "super-duper" fast internet connection costs CAN$65.00 just to use the internet. If i add a landline to that, i'll pay like $20.00 more, i think.
AND THEN, if i add cable TV to that, it's like another $40.00 depending on the crap i want to watch.
And when you have internet, phone AND cable, they give a special bundle price.
I'd rather pay the $0.50 per call at the corner public phone booth once or twice per month than have a landline so the annoying telemarketers can't bug me.
AND i only watch the internet for my visual entertainment. I get to choose what i want to watch, instead of what some program director thinks i want to watch.
I'm much happier like this.

And when i meet people and i hear them talking in my face about "Sally Boobjob and Johnny Willywacker" from some ridiculous TV sitcom, as if Sally and Johnny are household names and have 'something to say', i ask, "Who are these people? Are these friends of yours?"

When the person says, "Oh, they're on my favorite TV show called "Sally and Johnny". Don't you watch that show? It's so funny how Johnny says ...", i fake a grin and politely nod and think 'that head is empty' and i look for an exit.
Some people can only talk about the shyte they see on TV.
(Okay, rant is over)
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I found this on the net:
Phone Codes
For domestic long-distance calls or calls to mobile numbers, dial 0 followed by the city code (or mobile prefix) and then the seven-digit number.

Mobile Phones
....
More Information
To dial a landline or mobile number from a mobile phone dial 0 or +63 followed by the three-digit prefix and the seven-digit number.
Mobile prefixes always begin with a 9 (eg 917, 906)
.
Does this not address what Steve and User444 were saying?
So is it possible then, for a mobile phone to call a landline if she just dials the right numbers?

I am just wondering:
What if she had a landline installed in her mom's second house (where she lives alone with her child)?
She would have to pay a monthly fee for the landline service, correct?...but would she still have to pay for each call made whether she calls friends on mobile phones or lawyers in Olongapo from let's say, Balanga City?

We got inches away from her having a passport.
What happened was: When she was born, she was registered TWICE. So, she has TWO birth certificates each with different cities and even her weight at birth is not the same. She sent me photos of these two documents.   
So they blocked her dad's family name and told her to use her mom's maiden name.
Ah but here's the TWIST, her mom and dad were not married when she was born but they registered AS MARRIED somehow...SO confusing. 
So her real dad will get married soon to his gf, and her mom will soon be marrying her bf (my gf's step dad).
The passport office told her that her biological parents were married but her family knows they were NEVER married.  What a mess. So now both marriage parties have signed or will soon sign a CENOMAR.
But if the government says they were married at the time of her birth, then don't the children her mom had with the step-dad legally belong to her biological father even if their married never existed but exist on paper
Can't either mom or real dad accuse the other spouse of adultery if they get married?...won't that be considered fraud?
 My goodness!! This seems very complicated.

(@User444, my gf says that she, herself, and the father of HER two children were not married)

My gf only thought to look at her birth certificate on a Saturday and her appointment was on Tuesday - but we paid the PHP950.00 two weeks before the appointment was to take place. So, the bottom line is, we basically threw PHP950.00 up in the air on a very windy day because she didn't bother to check her papers before making her appointment. The payment is valid for only one month. 

Now, she's all stressed and in tears, not eating (no appetite) and angry at her parents for their negligence - she's feeling VERY despondent with all of this and she feels terrible about the lost non-refundable PHP950.00.
AND THEN she has me saying "Call all the lawyers to find the lowest price."

I, at first,  told her to contact a lawyer (i sent her a phone number) to learn the price for the legal service.
She was told by the lawyer it would cost PHP30,000.00 and that it would take six months to a year to fix her papers.  Bye-bye PHP950.00 passport money.

Aye, but she has two sons, as well. The PHP30K is only for HER documents, not her boys'.

So, i sent her all the addresses and phone numbers of Olongapo lawyers and told her to call each one to see who asks for the least amount of money to correct HER documents. 
That's why i am posting this.
« Last Edit: June 02, 2019, 12:58:18 AM by robbie_d »

Offline robbie_d

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Re: Mobiles calling landlines
« Reply #7 on: June 02, 2019, 12:40:42 AM »
People are mentioning Manila a lot.

This is the general area where she is.


Offline robbie_d

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Re: Mobiles calling landlines
« Reply #8 on: June 02, 2019, 12:42:32 AM »
This next segment is off topic, but "related" to the overall situation as stated in Reply Number 6.

I post it in case it's of interest to anyone. 
It's the law over there.

She wanted me to find this following  information, for her, online. 
It took about five minutes to find.
She was born in 1997

Home » Civil Registration

Legitimation

Release Date: Monday, January 2, 2012

Children born after one hundred and eighty days following the celebration of the marriage, and before three hundred days following its dissolution or the separation of the spouses sall be presumed to be legitimate. (Art. 225, Civil of the Philippines).
Children conceived or born during the marriage of the parents are legitimate.
Children conceived as a result of artificial insemination of the wife with the sperm of the husband or that of a donor are likewise legitimate children of the husband and his wife, provided that both of them authorized or ratified such insemination in a written instrument executed and signed by them before the birth of the child. The instrument shall be recorded in the civil registry together with the birth certificate of the child. (Art. 164, Family Code of the Philippines).

Is the child considered legitimate although the mother may have declared against its legitimacy?
The child shall be considered legitimate although the mother may have declared against its legitimacy or may have been sentenced as an adulteress. (Art. 167, Family Code of the Philippines)

What are the rights of legitimate children?
Legitimate children shall have the right :
1. To bear the surnames of the father and the mother:
2. To receive support from them, from their ascendants, and in a proper case, from their brothers and sisters, in conformity with article 291 and,
3. To the legitimate and other successional rights which this Code recognize in their favor. (Art. 263, Civil Code of the Philippines)
Does the practice of some Filipino Muslim of using the first name of the father as the family name of the children violate the provisions on the use of surnames?

Legitimate child have the right to bear the surname of the father and of the mother. (Art. 62(a) of P.D. 1083 (Code of Muslim Personal Law of the Philippines).

The provisions of the law governing use of surnames were formulated in order to avoid confusion in the use of surnames, and to settle doubts on their proper use (Report of Code Commission, p51, cited in Tolentino, supra, p.721), we are unable to find any provision in the Muslim Code or the Civil Code which would authorize the use of the name as the family name of surname of the children of Muslim parents, for purposes of registration, especially in accomplishing the Certificate of Live Birth (Mun. Form No.102).

Accordingly, unless the law is amended to reflect the alleged tradition or practice, the children should bear the family or surname of their father for registration purposes. (Opinion No. 112, Series of 1985, from the Minister of Justice Estelto P. Mendoza)

Who are illegitimate children?
Children conceived and born out a valid marriage are illegitimate, unless otherwise provided in the Family Code (Art. 165, F.C.)

Who are considered illegitimate children?
The following are illegitimate children :
1. Children born to couples who are not legally married or of common-law marriages;
2. Children born of incestuous marriages;
3. Children born of bigamous marriages;
4. Children born of adulterous relations between parents;
5. Children born of marriages void for reason of public policy under Art. 38 of the Family
Code;
6. Children born of couples below 18, whether they are married (which married is void) or not; and,
7. Children born of other void marriages under Art. 15 unless otherwise provided. (OCRG Cir. No. 89-13 dated July 17, 1989)

What is the rule on the registration of births of illegitimate children who were born prior to August 3, 1988?
Illegitimate children as defined under the Civil Code of the Philippines who were born prior to August 3, 1988 and whose births were not previously registered shall be registered under the following rules in addition to those provided for delayed registration of births;
1. Recognition or acknowledgement of an illegitimate child may be made jointly by the father and mother or by only one of them (Art. 276, C.C.) When the father or the mother makes the recognition separately, he or she shall not reveal the name of the person with whom he or she had the child; neither shall he or she state any circumstance whereby the other parent may be identified (Art. 280, C.C.)
2. An illegitimate child has the right to bear the surname of the parent recognizing him (par. 1, Art. 282, C.C.) However, an illegitimate child who is not recognized or acknowledged by both parents in accordance with law shall be registered under the surname of the mother (Opinion No. 147 s. 1986, Minister of Justice)
3. Recognition shall be made in the record of birth, a will, statement before a record, or in any authentic writing (Art. 278, C.C.). If made on record of birth at the time of registration the affidavit of acknowledgement printed at the back of the certificate of live birth shall be signed and sworn to jointly by the parents of the illegitimate child, or only by the mother if the father refuses (Sec. 5, Act No. 3753).

May an illegitimate child born on or after August 3, 1988 carry the surname of the father if the father executed an affidavit of admission of paternity?
Illegitimate children born on or after August 3, 1988 shall use the surname of the mother. (Section 1 OCRG Circular No.4 dated October 11, 1988).

The father of an illegitimate child who wishes to have his name indicated in item 13 of the Certificate of Live Birth shall execute an affidavit of Admission of Paternity in lieu of the affidavit of acknowledgement. The purpose of affidavit of admission of paternity is for the support and succession only, and it does not entitle the illegitimate child to use the surname of his father. (Section 2 OCRG Circular No. 4 dated October 11, 1988)

What is the rule on the registration of births illegitimate children who were born on August 3, 1988 and thereafter?
The following rules shall govern the registration of illegitimate children who were born on August 3, 1988 and thereafter:
1. An illegitimate child shall use the surname of his mother (Art. 176, F.C.) regardless of whether or not his father admits paternity (opinion of Civil Code Revision Committee, September 23, 1988).
2. The name of the father of the illegitimate child may be indicated on the birth certificate of the latter whenever the former executes an affidavit of admission of paternity, provided that such affidavit shall not affect the naming of the illegitimate child (opinion of the Civil Code Revision Committee, September 23, 1988)
3. The affidavit mentioned in the immediately preceding paragraph, if executed by the father shall be permanently attached to and shall form part of the birth certificate of the illegitimate child. The birth certificate in such a case must have a remark "With Attached Affidavit of Admission of Paternity" impressed with a rubber stamp at the upper left-hand margin and duly signed by the local civil registrar or authorized civil registry personnel.
4. Illegitimate children falling under this classification who were not registered within the prescribed period of registration shall comply with the requirement of delayed registration of births. (Section 4 Circular No. 89-13 dated 17 July 1989)

What consist the full name of an individual?
The full name of an individual consists of a first or given name, a middle name which is the mother's maiden surname and the last name which is generally the father's surname. Entries of names in the birth certificate should, as much as possible and legally permissible, follow the above convention. (I.M. p 14)

Is it permissible to leave the first name of the child blank in case the parents cannot decide on the name yet?
If until registration the parents are not decided on the first name for the child, write only the middle and last name but never write "Baby Boy or Baby Girl". Entries such as "Jr." of "II" affixed to an individual's first name to distinguish him from an ascendant of the same name are acceptable as added identification. (I.M. p. 14-15).

What are the rules in making the entry of the last name of a child?
For a child born to a legally married couple, write the last name of father ;
For a child born to a mother who is not married during a pregnancy and at the time of birth, the following rules shall apply:
1. If the child was born on or after 3 August 1988, write the last name of the mother.
2. If the child was born before 3 August 1988:
Enter the last name of the father if both parents execute the Affidavit of Acknowledgement at the back of the Certificate of Live Birth.
Enter the last name of the acknowledging parent if either the father or the mother alone acknowledges the child. In this case, no information should lead to the identity of the parent not acknowledging the child, that is, the space provided for the information about the parent must have "Not Applicable" or "N.A." as entry".
If no parent acknowledges the child, enter the last name of the mother (I.M. p. 15-16)

What is the rule in the registration of the place of birth?
1. For births that occur in hospital, clinic or institution, write the complete name and address of the hospital or institution.
2. For births that did not occur in any of the above institution, write the complete address where the birth occurred. (I.M. p. 17)

Is it important to indicate the date and place of the marriage of the parents in the certificate of live birth?
It is extremely important that this item (Item 18) is not left blank, otherwise, the legitimacy of the child will be questioned.

If the parents have forgotten the exact date of their marriage, enter the approximate year. If they cannot approximate the year, enter "forgotten".

Enter "Not Applicable" if the child has unknown father or mother.

Enter "Unknown", "Don't Know" or "D.K." if the informant could not supply the information.

Enter "Not Married" if the parents of the child are not legally married on or before the birth of the child and their names appeared in Item 6 and Item 13. (I.M. p. 24-25)

What is the implication if Item 22 (Received at the Office of the Civil Registrar) is not signed by the receiver?
The signature affixed in this item indicates that the certificate was filed and accepted by the civil registrar. The date indicates whether the birth certificate was filed within the reglamentary period.

The absence of the necessary signature in Item 22 can be a basis for questioning the validity of the certificate. (I.M. p.27)

What is meant by an “Out-of-town Reporting of Birth”?
An out-of-town reporting of birth occurs when the Certificate of Live Birth is presented to the civil registrar of a city or municipality which is not the place of birth, not for registration but to be forwarded to the civil registrar of the city or municipality where the birth occurred and where it should be registered.

The duty of accepting Certificate of Live Birth for out-of-town reporting by the concerned civil registrar may also be performed by the Civil Registrar-General of by his authorized representatives who are the Regional Administrators and Provincial Statistics Officers of the Philippine Statistics Authority. (Rule 20, A.O. No. 1 s 1993).

What are the requirements to be complied with by the concerned parties in the out-of-town reporting of birth?
1. The party who is applying for out-of-town reporting of birth shall execute an affidavit declaring therein, among other things, the facts of birth and the reasons why said birth was not recorded in the civil registrar of the city or municipality where it occurred. The affidavit which must be attested by at least two (2) witnesses, shall serve as an application for registration shall be submitted to the civil registrar together with four (4) copies of the Certificate of Live Birth;
2. If the application is for delayed registration of birth, the requirements under the rules governing delayed registration of birth shall also be complied with;
3. The civil registrar or the authorized representative of the Philippine Statistics Authority to the application for out-of-town reporting is presented may require from the applicant such other supporting papers as may be considered necessary in establishing the facts of birth especially those pertaining to the date and place of birth and filiation of the child whose birth is being sought for registration;
4. The Certificate of Live Birth, for the purpose of this Rule, shall have the marginal annotation in the form of the following remark : "Registered pursuant to Rule 20 of the Administrative Order No. 1, s. 1993" ; and,
5. The civil registrar of the city or municipality where the out-of-town reporting is sought, upon receipt of the Certificate of Live Birth and pertinent papers, shall proceed with the registration. He shall indicate the date when he received the document, and shall sign over his printed name in appropriate space in the Certificate of Live Birth. When the Certificate of Live Birth has been duly recorded and assigned a registry number, the civil registrar shall send back the original copy to the civil registrar or the authorized representative of the Philippine Statistics Authority who forwarded the Certificate of Live Birth, who in turn shall give the copy bearing the registry number to the registrant. (Rule 20, A.O. Order No. 1 S. 1993)

What is the legitimation and who can be legitimated?
1. Legitimation is a remedy by means of which those who in fact were not born in wedlock and should, therefore, be considered illegitimate, are, by fiction, considered legitimate, it being supposed that they were born when their parents were already validly married. (1 Manresa 550, as cited on p. 251, Handbook on Family Code of the Philippines, Alicia V. Sempio-Diy).
2. Only children conceived and born outside of wedlock of parents who at the time of the conception of the former, were not disqualified by any impediments to marry each other, may be legitimated. (Art. 177, Family Code)
3. Legitimation of children by subsequent marriage of parents shall be recorded in the civil registry office of the place where the birth was recorded. The requirements for registration of legitimation of illegitimate children are:
a) Certificate of Marriage;
b) Certificate of Live Birth of the child;
c) Acknowledgement (not required for illegitimate children born on or after 3 August 1988);
d) Affidavit of legitimation executed by both parents which shall contain the following facts:
(1) the names of the parents;
(2) that at the time when child was conceived, the aforesaid parents could have contracted marriage, and that they subsequently contracted marriage,
(3) the date and place when such marriage was solemnized;
(4) the name of the officer who officiated the marriage;
(5) the city or municipality where such marriage was recorded;
(6) the name of the child to be legitimated, and the other facts of birth;
(7) the date and place where the birth of the child was registered; and
( 8 ) the manner by which the child was acknowledged by the parents which may be in the child’s record of birth, in a will, a statement before a court of record, or in any authentic writing (not required for illegitimate children born on or after 3 August 1988).

4. For a child to be considered legitimated by subsequent marriage, it is necessary that:
the parents could have legally contracted marriage at the time the child was conceived ;
that the child has been acknowledged by the parents before or after the celebration of their marriage;
and the acknowledgement has been made with the consent of the child, if age or with the approval of the court, if a minor, unless it has been made in the certificate before a court of record, or in any authentic writing.

The original family name of the child as appearing in Registrar of Births shall not be erased or deleted, but in the remarks space shall be written "Legitimated by Subsequent Marriage" indicating the family name which the child shall bear by virtue of the legitimation also giving reference to the entry number in the Registrar of Legal Instruments.

When the interested party requests a copy of the birth certificate of a legitimated child a certified copy of the certificate of Live Birth bearing the annotation "Legitimated by Subsequent Marriage on ________ (date of marriage) at __________ (place of marriage)" or a certified transcription using standard form from the Register of Births bearing the effects of legitimation and the same annotation indicated in the certified true copy shall be issued. (Rule 66, A.O. No. 1 S. 1993)

How does legitimation take place?
Legitimation shall take place by a subsequent valid marriage between parents. The annulment of a voidable marriage shall not affect the legitimation (Art. 178, Family Code of the Philippines).

Tags:
Civil Registration
« Last Edit: June 02, 2019, 01:00:56 AM by robbie_d »

Offline robbie_d

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Re: Mobiles calling landlines
« Reply #9 on: June 02, 2019, 03:17:03 AM »
Now, my gf was born to her mom when her mom was only 17. The mom was sold to my gf's father at the age of 15.

From the law:

Who are considered illegitimate children?
The following are illegitimate children :
1. Children born to couples who are not legally married or of common-law marriages;
2. Children born of incestuous marriages;
3. Children born of bigamous marriages;
4. Children born of adulterous relations between parents;
5. Children born of marriages void for reason of public policy under Art. 38 of the Family
Code;
6. Children born of couples below 18, whether they are married (which married is void) or not; and,
7. Children born of other void marriages under Art. 15 unless otherwise provided. (OCRG Cir. No. 89-13 dated July 17, 1989)


Offline suzukig1

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Re: Mobiles calling landlines
« Reply #10 on: June 02, 2019, 10:58:13 AM »
Mobile phones in the PHL can call landlines.

If it is not working

1. The wrong number was dialled.

2. There was not enough load available in the mobile phone.

Offline Steve & Myrlita

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  • Myrlita & I and all of our grandchildren.
Re: Mobiles calling landlines
« Reply #11 on: June 02, 2019, 11:45:26 AM »
Ok folks, the topic here is Mobiles Calling Landlines. Many of these posts are way off topic. I'll let the posts stand for now but please, let's get back on topic. I'm trying hard not to be a meanie so let's not push it.
Thank you...God Bless...
Bro Steve & Sis Myrlita
Bacolod City, PH
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*** RIP MY FRIEND LEE ***
***       RIP DON H        ***
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Offline robbie_d

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Re: Mobiles calling landlines
« Reply #12 on: June 02, 2019, 12:33:06 PM »
Ok folks, the topic here is Mobiles Calling Landlines. Many of these posts are way off topic. I'll let the posts stand for now but please, let's get back on topic. I'm trying hard not to be a meanie so let's not push it.

Yes, Steve,

I am the only "folk" who took it "off topic" because the reason WHY i am asking about phones is because she can't call lawyers with her mobile.

While i was at it, i thought to offer the information about the laws concerning illegitimate children because the whole situation is about that, fundamentally.

I do apologize if i seem a tad inconsiderate to the forum "structure" but i think her situation is, in a way, related to the phone topic. The reason i brought the phone topic up is due to her not being able to contact lawyers with her mobile.

However, i did ask for a clarification of what you and User444 had said concerning dialing the right codes and the phone numbers in regards the what i found on the internet (and quoted) about codes and phone numbers needed to be dialed on a mobile with which to contact a landline. 

Now, had brought up my bicycle's flat tire and posted details on how to repair a flat tire, then i would then be really off topic lol.

I even mentioned it's "off-topic" and saw to quoting my own post concerning the law so that it can't be automatically quoted by others in this topic discussion.
However, if anyone wishes to, they can copy and paste the text in the post and repost it elsewhere in a topic discussion about illegitimate children born in The PH. 

I can't write posts that are like cartoon speech bubbles. Well, i suppose i CAN do that, but when i feel a need to elaborate, i like to think it's okay to do so.
I really feel words are important.

I think you do know how i can go on and on as i enjoy writing.
I will and do respect the rules. 

If it was up to me, i would have just created one thread called, "Robbie and his PH gf" and just put everything i've written so far into that one thread and let it go awry. At least, that way, i would know exactly where to find all the posts concerning her and me.
My whole relationship with her seems to be turning into an unexpected epic saga or drama.

I only have separate threads by trying to respect the topic structure of the forum menus. However, all i talk about is "Robbie and his PH gf".

Please, forgive me.
Rob


Offline Peter

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Re: Mobiles calling landlines
« Reply #13 on: June 02, 2019, 12:40:21 PM »
......................   
I refuse to call outside my Smart network, as the "load" just disappears "toot sweet!" .....
Peter
:-[ :-[ :-[
Just after I posted that, I had a message to contact a call centre 02 (Manila) number from my prepaid Smart sim mobile. Just under 4 minutes on the line cost PhP 50.00. Ouch!  :'(
For comparison, my wife and daughter get 100 minutes talk, valid for 3 days, for PhP 30.00 on a "Sasko" (sp?) promo.

Peter
Noli nothis permittere te terere.
Virtus autem corruptibilis est,
summa virtute prorsus corrumpitur,

Offline robbie_d

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Re: Mobiles calling landlines
« Reply #14 on: June 02, 2019, 01:10:51 PM »
Mobile phones in the PHL can call landlines.

If it is not working

1. The wrong number was dialled.

2. There was not enough load available in the mobile phone.

Hi suzukig1,

Thanks!! So she CAN call the lawyers' offices with her mobile. It's funny that she was not aware of that fact as she lives with that gadget in her hand all day long.

Here are two phone numbers of the twenty Olongapo City lawyers which i sent to her, as listed on the internet:
+63 998 976 3406 (This is a mobile, correct?)
+63 47 223 7931   (This is not a mobile, correct?)

What exactly would she have to dial if she is NOT in Olongapo City when calling these Olongapo City numbers?

This what i had posted earlier.
"I found this on the net:
Phone Codes
For domestic long-distance calls or calls to mobile numbers, dial 0 followed by the city code (or mobile prefix) and then the seven-digit number.

Mobile Phones
....
More Information
To dial a landline or mobile number from a mobile phone dial 0 or +63 followed by the three-digit prefix and the seven-digit number.
Mobile prefixes always begin with a 9 (eg 917, 906)."

- One of the numbers is +63 47 223 7931. It only has a two-digit prefix. Does it matter? 
- If she is in let's say, Pilar (Bataan) and wants to call Olongapo (Bataan), is that considered a long distance call?
- From where to where on the map i've attached would be just over the borderline to make a phone call a long distance call?
- It says above "...dial 0 or +63 followed by...". Why would she dial a 0 when she can just dial +63?

I need to know what to tell her to dial, so she can't say again, "It doesn't work with a mobile!"


Thanks so much.
I appreciate everyone's time and efforts spent helping me understand it all.