Living In The Philippines Forum

Itís Your Money => Building in the Philippines => Topic started by: tennesseevolunteer on October 22, 2009, 07:41:58 AM

Title: For You Electricans
Post by: tennesseevolunteer on October 22, 2009, 07:41:58 AM
We are in the blue print stage now on our new home. I want to have a few 110 volts outlets installed in our home. We are planning on shipping most of our household items to the Philippines which will included TV\'s, kitchen items, computers and additional electrical things.
My question is HOW HARD WILL THIS BE??? HOW ABOUT THE ADDITIONAL COST???? I have read we can use transformers but they will cost alot to use full time. When we were in Borcay the hotel gave us these adaptors to use on our 110 items. They seemed to work well but will these work OK and not overload say the 40\" TV?

Also I want a grounded electrical system in our new house to avoid SHOCKS. Most outlets I seen was the old 2 prong outlet. Will the 3 prong outets from USA work there for 110 and 220? I want ground fault outlets every where water is within in 3 meters. Am I asking for too much??

Our new home will be our home for many years. My wife and I agree that it will be alto easier to do now than after the concrete is poured.

Any information on this will be appreciated
Title: Re: For You Electricans
Post by: on October 22, 2009, 08:27:37 AM
We are in the blue print stage now on our new home. I want to have a few 110 volts outlets installed in our home. We are planning on shipping most of our household items to the Philippines which will included TV\'s, kitchen items, computers and additional electrical things.
My question is HOW HARD WILL THIS BE??? HOW ABOUT THE ADDITIONAL COST???? I have read we can use transformers but they will cost alot to use full time. When we were in Borcay the hotel gave us these adaptors to use on our 110 items. They seemed to work well but will these work OK and not overload say the 40\" TV?

Also I want a grounded electrical system in our new house to avoid SHOCKS. Most outlets I seen was the old 2 prong outlet. Will the 3 prong outets from USA work there for 110 and 220? I want ground fault outlets every where water is within in 3 meters. Am I asking for too much??

Our new home will be our home for many years. My wife and I agree that it will be alto easier to do now than after the concrete is poured.

Any information on this will be appreciated

Running 110v supplies within the house should not be a problem, but I would suggest that you look for an alternative style of socket then change the plugs on your US equipment to suit. This will prevent helpers from destroying you equipment by plugging it into the 220v sockets. I am not sure where you would get your 110v supply from, but I have read somewhere that there may be a tap on the incoming 220v supply.

A lot of modern equipment, and this may well include your 40\" TV, will work on both 110v and 220v, just look on the back.

You can buy the three prong sockets here in the Philippines and I am having my whole house wired with earthed sockets. I am even specifying universal types in some locations to be able to use my UK plugs. We are also having ground fault outlets fitted on outside sockets such as in the open arcade area. Also check the location of sockets and light switches in showers and toilets.

You should insist that your wiring is done to your standard and not accept the dangerous situation that is normal here in the Philippines.

Another point to consider, is do you really need to bring all your 110v equipment with you? It could be better/cheaper to sell most of it and buy new here.

Colin
Title: Re: For You Electricans
Post by: geno555 on October 22, 2009, 09:02:51 AM
We are in the blue print stage now on our new home. I want to have a few 110 volts outlets installed in our home. We are planning on shipping most of our household items to the Philippines which will included TV\'s, kitchen items, computers and additional electrical things.
My question is HOW HARD WILL THIS BE??? HOW ABOUT THE ADDITIONAL COST???? I have read we can use transformers but they will cost a lot to use full time. When we were in Becky the hotel gave us these adaptors to use on our 110 items. They seemed to work well but will these work OK and not overload say the 40\" TV?

Also I want a grounded electrical system in our new house to avoid SHOCKS. Most outlets I seen was the old 2 prong outlet. Will the 3 prong outlets from USA work there for 110 and 220? I want ground fault outlets every where water is within in 3 meters. Am I asking for too much??


tennesseevolunteer

while probably being the least knowledgeable person on here I will tell you what I did for my situation was very similar to yours I have 19 BB boxes with appliances, antique rosewood clocks, one by Elgin along with several other 110 appliances that I fried before I asked the group and many responded and helped me out but especially the gentlemen called Art who posts on here a lot.

I got a transformer, but they are so damn heavy and you would need a ton of them to run all the stuff you probably have

i asked for a temporary solution and was given much good advice by lots of guys , but one in particular named Art who posts on here quite †often so you may want to contact him. Transformers to meet any real needs such as a microwave coffee maker and toaster, that is what I am †running on one transformer right now for it only has 3 plugs, but the damn things are so heavy mine is 37 kilos, I know because I had to pay for it when I bought it in Manila and flew back PAL and it cost me 3,200

I spoke with both my architect and electrician for hours before we agreed on where and how many 110 outlets i wanted, and I even showed them about grounded every outlet to avoid shocks, and it each water area where there is electricity, I bought from city hardware a ground fault device with a circuit breaker built in. they installed everything in each room exactly right , but then when it came to the kitchen,they really blew it along the back wall i wanted 6 110 outlets sometimes I use a slow cooker an electric frying pan plus coffee maker , blender, etc, so I wanted extras, well one day when i was checking the area i saw this 6 plugs at ground level in the kitchen area, i guess it was my fault but my kitchen cabinets will be hand carved Nara with granite tops, and come out to about my waist, so the plugs have to be up high enough on the wall or otherwise you would be moving a whole slab of granite cabinets in and out to plug in the appliances.

They all had a good laugh, and replaced them †to the right level, now whether they were laughing at me or with me , who cares as long as the job is done right.
You certainly can buy individual cheap Chinese import transformers † from any vendor in the market, but for me I would not trust them, nice way to burn your house down IMHO.

Good Luck and Happy Building, everyday is an adventure believe me, †I had two transformers I mean the big ones sitting on top of the electric poles blow within seconds of each other about 11 days ago, with the data I lost which somethings is hard to put a value on but I know I lost over 150.000 pesos worth of information.. and I had what was supposed to be an unreachable system that would shut down way before a power surge or complete blackout †like in the blowing of two transformers at once, well I am here to tell you I have been,going through box after box trying to find my old hardrives that I save when I get rid of a computer hoping some of my old pictures of my family life growing up on the water and my personal heroes who are now dead, I just hope I have them on disk somewhere.

Murf

Our new home will be our home for many years. My wife and I agree that it will be alto easier to do now than after the concrete is poured.

Any information on this will be appreciated
Title: Re: For You Electricans
Post by: on October 22, 2009, 11:09:21 AM
tennesseevolunteer

You shouldn\'t waste your time and money buying stuff in the U.S. to just ship and use here in the Philippines unless it\'s cheaper and or of better quality. Anyways, most of the appliances and electronic gadgets sold in the Philippines or anywhere abroad mostly now have built-in automatic voltage regulators 110 to 240v and shouldn\'t be a problem if you plug in any outlet as long as you know it\'s an auto-volt appliance or electronic gadget!
There\'s plenty of good hardware stores in the Philippines to meet your electrical requirements of whatever you want to install in your new home, just plan it wisely because once the wiring is in, it\'ll be hard to rewire once everything has been covered up! Those after thoughts, change of mind and later, alterations can be an expensive proposition if not done right the first time around!

ezArt † †
Title: Re: For You Electricans
Post by: tennesseevolunteer on October 22, 2009, 09:31:26 PM
From what I understand when we make the final move to the Philippines we will be able to bring our household items without any tariff taxes. We have to good of bedroom, living and kitchen items not to bring. If we have a huge sale before I know we would have to sale at very discounted price. We would then have to re-buy everything at a huge retail price. We do not want to sleep on foam mattress. I have seen the sofas there and I just do not fit(I am a tall man and like to lay around when possible. For the kitchen items, I believe we have much better quality items that we could buy there without paying much more pesos.

If I have to we can use transformers for the kitchen items but again I have read where the transformers use a lot of electricity. Our frig would be the only item that would be required to run full time. I\'ve been running our freezer off solar power here in the states without a problem(using only one panel and an inverter. I check on the prices for most of these items and I found that most were more expensive and less quality.

Maricel is checking with several electricians to find out if what I want is do able. If it is we will use two different color outlet plates to† tell difference of 220 and 110.

What ever we do I will insist that my concerns be followed to the fullest or we will find someone who can follow my demands.


THANKS FOR THE INFORMATION.
Title: Re: For You Electricans
Post by: RUFUS on October 22, 2009, 11:41:47 PM
I do not hail from the land of Electrica, but I might have some insights for you.
The RP has 2 different forms of 220v delivery systems. 1 is a 3 wire similar to the US and uses separate 110v legs and a neutral. This type is not very common, but if you live in/around a place that has it then wiring your house with such outlets would be very easy and inexpensive.
2nd and probably used in 98%+ of the country is a 2 wire 220v setup that uses a hot and ground system. This setup delivers 220v on one leg and WILL need to be stepped down by way of a transformer. The cost of a large or even several small transformers will offset whatever you will lose by selling off your goods and repurchasing in the RP. Plus there is ALWAYS the OOOPS factor of someone plugging a 110 unit into a 220 outlet, and you can pretty much count on it happening no matter how careful you might be. Then you are buying a new product anyways. Now they do make outlets and plugs with different blade configuration so that could help reduce mistakes, but it will involve cutting off all the plugs and replacing them with the different style and also you need to figure in the cost of every plug you will need to replace...6 of 1, half dozen of the other...
Just some food for thought
Title: Re: For You Electricans
Post by: on October 23, 2009, 12:29:03 AM
Do know you about the jumper wire technique on an electrical wall outlet that becomes a 110v and 220v in one just by jumping the wires socket to socket and to ground where the one socket on the outlet turns to 110v? I have some wall outlets setup that way which exempts using any transformers. Just remember which outlets you converted and or weather it\'s the righthand or lefthand, top or bottom plug that\'s the 110v. Ask your local electrician about it, it\'s old school to them. Works fine for my 110v micro wave oven and old stereo components for 11 years now! I only use a small 250 watt capacity 220v to 110v voltage regular for my old 110v VHS recorder (no longer works after 20 yrs), cordless phone and answering machine upstairs in our bedroom. Eventually when all my 110v stuff craps out, I\'ll just go 220volts all way around with all my wall outlets. Don\'t intend on buying anymore 110v stuff! Anyway, most of the stuff nowadays have built-in†105v-240v voltage regulators, so need to worry about where you plug in!†
Title: Re: For You Electricans
Post by: dylanaz on October 23, 2009, 01:24:37 AM
The RP has 2 different forms of 220v delivery systems. 1 is a 3 wire similar to the US and uses separate 110v legs and a neutral. This type is not very common, but if you live in/around a place that has it then wiring your house with such outlets would be very easy and inexpensive.

What would happen if you were to use only 1 leg of this 110v and send the ground directly to an earthed 6ft rod† ;D

Hmm.. nevermind dont try this at all...


DONT TRY IT!! DONT TRY IT !!! but... just wondering if its possible.
Title: Re: For You Electricans
Post by: RUFUS on October 23, 2009, 06:56:09 AM
The RP has 2 different forms of 220v delivery systems. 1 is a 3 wire similar to the US and uses separate 110v legs and a neutral. This type is not very common, but if you live in/around a place that has it then wiring your house with such outlets would be very easy and inexpensive.

What would happen if you were to use only 1 leg of this 110v and send the ground directly to an earthed 6ft rod† ;D

Hmm.. nevermind dont try this at all...


DONT TRY IT!! DONT TRY IT !!! but... just wondering if its possible.

It is not only possible, but it is similar to how the US breaker box is set up.
Title: Re: For You Electricans
Post by: tennesseevolunteer on October 23, 2009, 08:39:36 AM
I have decided with the help of all this information to have Maricel do me a big favor. I asked her to do some shopping for prices for our major applances this way I can make the best decision. I know when these things wear out they will be replaced with the 220 items.
Title: Re: For You Electricans
Post by: on October 23, 2009, 01:13:23 PM
I guess I need to know/understand what you mean by, \"jumping the wires socket to socket and to ground\", to get 110 off of 2 wire 220 service mostly here in the Philippines?

I just can\'t understand when 220 here, just runs one prong in and one out with the way you explained your system.
B-Ray

Do know you about the jumper wire technique on an electrical wall outlet that becomes a 110v and 220v in one just by jumping the wires socket to socket and to ground where the one socket on the outlet turns to 110v? I have some wall outlets setup that way which exempts using any transformers. Just remember which outlets you converted and or weather it\'s the righthand or lefthand, top or bottom plug that\'s the 110v. Ask your local electrician about it, it\'s old school to them. Works fine for my 110v micro wave oven and old stereo components for 11 years now! I only use a small 250 watt capacity 220v to 110v voltage regular for my old 110v VHS recorder (no longer works after 20 yrs), cordless phone and answering machine upstairs in our bedroom. Eventually when all my 110v stuff craps out, I\'ll just go 220volts all way around with all my wall outlets. Don\'t intend on buying anymore 110v stuff! Anyway, most of the stuff nowadays have built-in†105v-240v voltage regulators, so need to worry about where you plug in!†
Title: Re: For You Electricans
Post by: Steve & Myrlita on October 23, 2009, 01:43:11 PM
I guess I need to know/understand what you mean by, \"jumping the wires socket to socket and to ground\", to get 110 off of 2 wire 220 service mostly here in the Philippines?

I just can\'t understand when 220 here, just runs one prong in and one out with the way you explained your system.
B-Ray

Do know you about the jumper wire technique on an electrical wall outlet that becomes a 110v and 220v in one just by jumping the wires socket to socket and to ground where the one socket on the outlet turns to 110v? I have some wall outlets setup that way which exempts using any transformers. Just remember which outlets you converted and or weather it\'s the righthand or lefthand, top or bottom plug that\'s the 110v. Ask your local electrician about it, it\'s old school to them. Works fine for my 110v micro wave oven and old stereo components for 11 years now! I only use a small 250 watt capacity 220v to 110v voltage regular for my old 110v VHS recorder (no longer works after 20 yrs), cordless phone and answering machine upstairs in our bedroom. Eventually when all my 110v stuff craps out, I\'ll just go 220volts all way around with all my wall outlets. Don\'t intend on buying anymore 110v stuff! Anyway, most of the stuff nowadays have built-in†105v-240v voltage regulators, so need to worry about where you plug in!†
I agree. Wiring in the US & here only in select Subic or MM areas had that system. It\'s a 220V transformer up on the pole with a 3rd wire that is a center tap. The center tap is grounded as a neutral wire so each half of the transformer is divided into 2 branches of 110v. Here in the rest of the country, there are only 2 wires off that 220v pole transformer. One is 220V or high side, other is low side or ground. There is no 3rd wire center tap to even use therefore no means of adapting it to 110v unless a separate step down transformer is used. It must also be rated at least 20% higher wattage then you require to avoid eventual over heating thus burn out. Most transformers can not run continuously above 80% load. Hope this helps....God Bless.....
Title: Re: For You Electricans
Post by: on October 23, 2009, 02:08:27 PM
I guess I need to know/understand what you mean by, \"jumping the wires socket to socket and to ground\", to get 110 off of 2 wire 220 service mostly here in the Philippines?

I just can\'t understand when 220 here, just runs one prong in and one out with the way you explained your system.
B-Ray

Do know you about the jumper wire technique on an electrical wall outlet that becomes a 110v and 220v in one just by jumping the wires socket to socket and to ground where the one socket on the outlet turns to 110v? I have some wall outlets setup that way which exempts using any transformers. Just remember which outlets you converted and or weather it\'s the righthand or lefthand, top or bottom plug that\'s the 110v. Ask your local electrician about it, it\'s old school to them. Works fine for my 110v micro wave oven and old stereo components for 11 years now! I only use a small 250 watt capacity 220v to 110v voltage regular for my old 110v VHS recorder (no longer works after 20 yrs), cordless phone and answering machine upstairs in our bedroom. Eventually when all my 110v stuff craps out, I\'ll just go 220volts all way around with all my wall outlets. Don\'t intend on buying anymore 110v stuff! Anyway, most of the stuff nowadays have built-in 105v-240v voltage regulators, so need to worry about where you plug in! †
I agree. Wiring in the US & here only in select Subic or MM areas had that system. It\'s a 220V transformer up on the pole with a 3rd wire that is a center tap. The center tap is grounded as a neutral wire so each half of the transformer is divided into 2 branches of 110v. Here in the rest of the country, there are only 2 wires off that 220v pole transformer. One is 220V or high side, other is low side or ground. There is no 3rd wire center tap to even use therefore no means of adapting it to 110v unless a separate step down transformer is used. It must also be rated at least 20% higher wattage then you require to avoid eventual over heating thus burn out. Most transformers can not run continuously above 80% load. Hope this helps....God Bless.....
B-Ray,

It\'s not really my system per say, it was done by my contractor\'s electrician by using a jumper on selected wall outlets I wanted a 110v plug using a 3 or 2 pronged 220v wall outlet. I didn\'t actually see how it was done, but I did notice an added bumper wire to both sockets on the one wall outlet, I suppose was grounded, because without a ground, there will be no 110v. As I mentioned, ask your local electrician to explain how it is done without the use of a transformer. All I know is, that it works and been using it ever since we moved in our recently built home in 2001. We have the up to date modern U.S. standard circuit breaker main panel and wall outlets installed in our home. I too am not an expert when it comes to electrical stuff. I just know enough to get by and know what the NO-NOs are when handling electrical live wire, you don\'t (turn if off on the main circuit breaker panel before doing any electrical wiring on your own)! Been there, done that! 220v gives a nasty jolt, makes your bones, balls ache and hair stand up! Ha ha ha ha! Just kidding! Just slightly! † †

Art †
Title: Re: For You Electricans
Post by: aerosick on October 24, 2009, 06:32:09 AM
I guess I need to know/understand what you mean by, \"jumping the wires socket to socket and to ground\", to get 110 off of 2 wire 220 service mostly here in the Philippines?

I just can\'t understand when 220 here, just runs one prong in and one out with the way you explained your system.
B-Ray

Do know you about the jumper wire technique on an electrical wall outlet that becomes a 110v and 220v in one just by jumping the wires socket to socket and to ground where the one socket on the outlet turns to 110v? I have some wall outlets setup that way which exempts using any transformers. Just remember which outlets you converted and or weather it\'s the righthand or lefthand, top or bottom plug that\'s the 110v. Ask your local electrician about it, it\'s old school to them. Works fine for my 110v micro wave oven and old stereo components for 11 years now! I only use a small 250 watt capacity 220v to 110v voltage regular for my old 110v VHS recorder (no longer works after 20 yrs), cordless phone and answering machine upstairs in our bedroom. Eventually when all my 110v stuff craps out, I\'ll just go 220volts all way around with all my wall outlets. Don\'t intend on buying anymore 110v stuff! Anyway, most of the stuff nowadays have built-in 105v-240v voltage regulators, so need to worry about where you plug in!†
I agree. Wiring in the US & here only in select Subic or MM areas had that system. It\'s a 220V transformer up on the pole with a 3rd wire that is a center tap. The center tap is grounded as a neutral wire so each half of the transformer is divided into 2 branches of 110v. Here in the rest of the country, there are only 2 wires off that 220v pole transformer. One is 220V or high side, other is low side or ground. There is no 3rd wire center tap to even use therefore no means of adapting it to 110v unless a separate step down transformer is used. It must also be rated at least 20% higher wattage then you require to avoid eventual over heating thus burn out. Most transformers can not run continuously above 80% load. Hope this helps....God Bless.....
B-Ray,

It\'s not really my system per say, it was done by my contractor\'s electrician by using a jumper on selected wall outlets I wanted a 110v plug using a 3 or 2 pronged 220v wall outlet. I didn\'t actually see how it was done, but I did notice an added bumper wire to both sockets on the one wall outlet, I suppose was grounded, because without a ground, there will be no 110v. As I mentioned, ask your local electrician to explain how it is done without the use of a transformer. All I know is, that it works and been using it ever since we moved in our recently built home in 2001. We have the up to date modern U.S. standard circuit breaker main panel and wall outlets installed in our home. I too am not an expert when it comes to electrical stuff. I just know enough to get by and know what the NO-NOs are when handling electrical live wire, you don\'t (turn if off on the main circuit breaker panel before doing any electrical wiring on your own)! Been there, done that! 220v gives a nasty jolt, makes your bones, balls ache and hair stand up! Ha ha ha ha! Just kidding! Just slightly!† †

Art†

Art,

You live close to the former US Naval base was, correct? It sounds to me like you have the 3-wire secondary system that was originally installed for the Naval base personnel. Are there 3 wires coming in to your house?

Running 2 different voltage circuits is not for everyone. You pay plenty for your own individual overhead transformer and pole to service your house. Even with different color/shape of outlet plugs, the helpers will still manage to burn up your 120v equipment in a week or less.

To me, what you will spend for this will buy a lot of compatible equipment for your home.

Billy

Retired Journeyman Electric Lineman

(worked on everything from AAA batteries to lightning... ::) )
Title: Re: For You Electricans
Post by: on October 24, 2009, 09:56:27 AM
I guess I need to know/understand what you mean by, \"jumping the wires socket to socket and to ground\", to get 110 off of 2 wire 220 service mostly here in the Philippines?

I just can\'t understand when 220 here, just runs one prong in and one out with the way you explained your system.
B-Ray

Do know you about the jumper wire technique on an electrical wall outlet that becomes a 110v and 220v in one just by jumping the wires socket to socket and to ground where the one socket on the outlet turns to 110v? I have some wall outlets setup that way which exempts using any transformers. Just remember which outlets you converted and or weather it\'s the righthand or lefthand, top or bottom plug that\'s the 110v. Ask your local electrician about it, it\'s old school to them. Works fine for my 110v micro wave oven and old stereo components for 11 years now! I only use a small 250 watt capacity 220v to 110v voltage regular for my old 110v VHS recorder (no longer works after 20 yrs), cordless phone and answering machine upstairs in our bedroom. Eventually when all my 110v stuff craps out, I\'ll just go 220volts all way around with all my wall outlets. Don\'t intend on buying anymore 110v stuff! Anyway, most of the stuff nowadays have built-in 105v-240v voltage regulators, so need to worry about where you plug in! †
I agree. Wiring in the US & here only in select Subic or MM areas had that system. It\'s a 220V transformer up on the pole with a 3rd wire that is a center tap. The center tap is grounded as a neutral wire so each half of the transformer is divided into 2 branches of 110v. Here in the rest of the country, there are only 2 wires off that 220v pole transformer. One is 220V or high side, other is low side or ground. There is no 3rd wire center tap to even use therefore no means of adapting it to 110v unless a separate step down transformer is used. It must also be rated at least 20% higher wattage then you require to avoid eventual over heating thus burn out. Most transformers can not run continuously above 80% load. Hope this helps....God Bless.....
B-Ray,

It\'s not really my system per say, it was done by my contractor\'s electrician by using a jumper on selected wall outlets I wanted a 110v plug using a 3 or 2 pronged 220v wall outlet. I didn\'t actually see how it was done, but I did notice an added bumper wire to both sockets on the one wall outlet, I suppose was grounded, because without a ground, there will be no 110v. As I mentioned, ask your local electrician to explain how it is done without the use of a transformer. All I know is, that it works and been using it ever since we moved in our recently built home in 2001. We have the up to date modern U.S. standard circuit breaker main panel and wall outlets installed in our home. I too am not an expert when it comes to electrical stuff. I just know enough to get by and know what the NO-NOs are when handling electrical live wire, you don\'t (turn if off on the main circuit breaker panel before doing any electrical wiring on your own)! Been there, done that! 220v gives a nasty jolt, makes your bones, balls ache and hair stand up! Ha ha ha ha! Just kidding! Just slightly! † †

Art †

Art,

You live close to the former US Naval base was, correct? It sounds to me like you have the 3-wire secondary system that was originally installed for the Naval base personnel. Are there 3 wires coming in to your house?

Running 2 different voltage circuits is not for everyone. You pay plenty for your own individual overhead transformer and pole to service your house. Even with different color/shape of outlet plugs, the helpers will still manage to burn up your 120v equipment in a week or less.

To me, what you will spend for this will buy a lot of compatible equipment for your home.

Billy

Retired Journeyman Electric Lineman

(worked on everything from AAA batteries to lightning... ::) )
No, we don\'t live near a military base. We live in a new subdivision just developed in 1995 and completed in 2001 in Sta. Rosa, Laguna. The building materials used by the developers was of U.S. standards and there is a pole with a ground, but some of the wiring going into the house have 2 and 3 wires for a 2 or 3 pronged wall outlet. Just a few of my 220v outlet has the jumper wire to convert one of the socket to provide 110v. All I know is, that it works for my 110v microwave oven and rice cooker for the past 10 years! But I did experience a voltage lost when the ground wire on the pole loosened it\'s crimp at the ground splice connection. Just had to re-crimp the ground splice and my 110v was restored! † †
Title: Re: For You Electricans
Post by: aerosick on October 24, 2009, 10:17:45 AM

No, we don\'t live near a military base. We live in a new subdivision just developed in 1995 and completed in 2001 in Sta. Rosa, Laguna. The building materials used by the developers was of U.S. standards and there is a pole with a ground, but some of the wiring going into the house have 2 and 3 wires for a 2 or 3 pronged wall outlet. Just a few of my 220v outlet has the jumper wire to convert one of the socket to provide 110v. All I know is, that it works for my 110v microwave oven and rice cooker for the past 10 years! But I did experience a voltage lost when the ground wire on the pole loosened it\'s crimp at the ground splice connection. Just had to re-crimp the ground splice and my 110v was restored!† †

So, are there 2 or 3 wires coming to your house from the pole(s) where the overhead transformer is located? Is your electrical service made up of 2 insulated wires or 2 insulated and 1 bare wire (3 total wires)?

The ground wire loosening is not unusual or for the ground rod to erode and needs to be replaced.

Billy
Title: Re: For You Electricans
Post by: on October 24, 2009, 10:25:36 AM

No, we don\'t live near a military base. We live in a new subdivision just developed in 1995 and completed in 2001 in Sta. Rosa, Laguna. The building materials used by the developers was of U.S. standards and there is a pole with a ground, but some of the wiring going into the house have 2 and 3 wires for a 2 or 3 pronged wall outlet. Just a few of my 220v outlet has the jumper wire to convert one of the socket to provide 110v. All I know is, that it works for my 110v microwave oven and rice cooker for the past 10 years! But I did experience a voltage lost when the ground wire on the pole loosened it\'s crimp at the ground splice connection. Just had to re-crimp the ground splice and my 110v was restored!† †

So, are there 2 or 3 wires coming to your house from the pole(s) where the overhead transformer is located? Is your electrical service made up of 2 insulated wires or 2 insulated and 1 bare wire (3 total wires)?

The ground wire loosening is not unusual or for the ground rod to erode and needs to be replaced.

Billy
BOTH are used inside the home! But, the transformer is not directly overhead or on our pole. It\'s further away on a main pole Meralco put in.
Title: Re: For You Electricans
Post by: aerosick on October 24, 2009, 10:31:12 AM
BOTH are used inside the home! But, the transformer is not directly overhead or on our pole. It\'s further away on a main pole Meralco put in.

So there\'s 2 wires coming to your house from the transformer pole and both wires are insulated? If you get a chance to look at the Meralco transformer, see if there are 2 or 3 wires connected to the insulated bushings on the side of the transformer. Also look for a ground wire coming down the pole that\'s connected to the transformer.

Billy
Title: Re: For You Electricans
Post by: tennesseevolunteer on October 27, 2009, 04:52:11 AM
Yesterday I sat down with my cousin over a few cold ones. He is an electrician here in USA and did my wiring on my last remod job. I asked him is it possible to take 220 power and use a jumper wire and have 220 in one plug and 110 in the other. He said first thing the only way is to have a ground wire.† I have trusted him with my life and I trust him on his information. For us still waiting on the blue prints, I\'ll wait till I meet with the electrician and see if it is old school for him if not I guess I\'ll use transformers.

Maricel sent me several web sites that sell major appliances. I have found that big TV\'s are much more expensive and the refig\'s are not the type we desire or have but everything else seems to be in the replacable price range.

We still have time to make great decisions.

THANKS FOR THE INFO
Title: Re: For You Electricans
Post by: aerosick on October 27, 2009, 05:11:56 AM
Yesterday I sat down with my cousin over a few cold ones. He is an electrician here in USA and did my wiring on my last remod job. I asked him is it possible to take 220 power and use a jumper wire and have 220 in one plug and 110 in the other. He said first thing the only way is to have a ground wire.† I have trusted him with my life and I trust him on his information. For us still waiting on the blue prints, I\'ll wait till I meet with the electrician and see if it is old school for him if not I guess I\'ll use transformers.

Maricel sent me several web sites that sell major appliances. I have found that big TV\'s are much more expensive and the refig\'s are not the type we desire or have but everything else seems to be in the replacable price range.

We still have time to make great decisions.

THANKS FOR THE INFO

A guy I know that lives in Cebu took a vacation in Hong Kong where he bought the big appliances and had them shipped there. He was able to find larger appliances and TVs like he wanted to have.

Another option...

Billy

Billy
Title: Re: For You Electricans
Post by: on October 27, 2009, 09:39:56 AM
Yesterday I sat down with my cousin over a few cold ones. He is an electrician here in USA and did my wiring on my last remod job. I asked him is it possible to take 220 power and use a jumper wire and have 220 in one plug and 110 in the other. He said first thing the only way is to have a ground wire. †I have trusted him with my life and I trust him on his information. For us still waiting on the blue prints, I\'ll wait till I meet with the electrician and see if it is old school for him if not I guess I\'ll use transformers.

Billy


Billy,

All I know is that my 110v socket works that\'s on the same 220v wall outlet.

Check out this website:

http://en.allexperts.com/q/Electric-Power-Utilities-2405/2008/7/splitting-220v-110-v.htm

Hope this answers your question. I\'m not an electrician, but it\'s amazing what you can find on the internet by just asking Google Search a \"HOW TO\" question and it only took me a matter of minutes to find this subject matter.

Art
Title: Re: For You Electricans
Post by: dylanaz on October 27, 2009, 10:30:53 AM
Some people I ran across just did a test of this and documented it in detail on a tagalog forum I belong to.

Switching to 110v by grounding one side of the 220v outlet resulted in a 50% decrease in monitored consumption of the same electronics per their meter box.

Basically if a device had dual voltage and was using 0.25 kilotwtts per hour at 220v when they converted the outlet to 110v the same device was now reading on the meter a mere 0.13

Sounds to me like something is not as intended here - needless to say - I dont plan to do this. The utility company may hunt you down for accidentally discovering this .. abberration.
Title: Re: For You Electricans
Post by: aerosick on October 27, 2009, 11:34:46 AM

Billy,

All I know is that my 110v socket works that\'s on the same 220v wall outlet.

Check out this website:

[url]http://en.allexperts.com/q/Electric-Power-Utilities-2405/2008/7/splitting-220v-110-v.htm[/url]

Hope this answers your question. I\'m not an electrician, but it\'s amazing what you can find on the internet by just asking Google Search a \"HOW TO\" question and it only took me a matter of minutes to find this subject matter.

Art


Art,

Here\'s from the Google Search you Posted:

Quote
This is pretty simple. What you have for 220v is two hot wires, a neutral wire and a ground wire. Now for 110v you will only need one hot wire, one neutral wire and your ground wire.


That\'s true, but where I\'ve been in the Philippines, 2 wires of the above equation are missing in their circuits:

1. Neutral wire

2. Ground wire

What\'s left is 2 hot wires that complete a 220v circuit. If you \"ground\" 1 of these wires to complete your circuit, that \"ground\" has to travel through the earth until it finds another wire \"grounded\" on the same transformer, the same circuit that feeds your transformer or somewhere back towards the generator.

You can probably guess what will happen if 1 of your neighbors decides to \"ground\" 1 of their hot wires, but picks the opposite hot wire that you did. Or if you happen to be that 2nd person applying a \"ground\" on your opposite hot wire. It will be a \"matter of seconds\" to blow things up, including yourself!

Danger, danger!!!

Billy
Title: Re: For You Electricans
Post by: on October 27, 2009, 01:58:15 PM

Billy,

All I know is that my 110v socket works that\'s on the same 220v wall outlet.

Check out this website:

[url]http://en.allexperts.com/q/Electric-Power-Utilities-2405/2008/7/splitting-220v-110-v.htm[/url]

Hope this answers your question. I\'m not an electrician, but it\'s amazing what you can find on the internet by just asking Google Search a \"HOW TO\" question and it only took me a matter of minutes to find this subject matter.

Art


Art,

Here\'s from the Google Search you Posted:

Quote
This is pretty simple. What you have for 220v is two hot wires, a neutral wire and a ground wire. Now for 110v you will only need one hot wire, one neutral wire and your ground wire.


That\'s true, but where I\'ve been in the Philippines, 2 wires of the above equation are missing in their circuits:

1. Neutral wire

2. Ground wire

What\'s left is 2 hot wires that complete a 220v circuit. If you \"ground\" 1 of these wires to complete your circuit, that \"ground\" has to travel through the earth until it finds another wire \"grounded\" on the same transformer, the same circuit that feeds your transformer or somewhere back towards the generator.

You can probably guess what will happen if 1 of your neighbors decides to \"ground\" 1 of their hot wires, but picks the opposite hot wire that you did. Or if you happen to be that 2nd person applying a \"ground\" on your opposite hot wire. It will be a \"matter of seconds\" to blow things up, including yourself!

Danger, danger!!!

Billy


It isn\'t my theory, that\'s not the only website that has the subject on 220v to 110v conversion. If it\'s not safe, why do they publish it on the internet? Anyway, I\'m the only one using a 110v outlet blocks away from any other homes here in our subdivision. I have been using my 110v outlet for 10 years now! My contractor\'s electrician was the one who converted a few of my 220v outlet with a 110v outlet, hasn\'t fried anything yet like my 10 yr old †Panasonic microwave oven, which is the only highest wattage that\'s putting out! No reason to fix anything that ain\'t broke! Anyways, I have fire insurance for our home and a good U.S. Standard type main circuit breaker panel!

Art † †