Living In The Philippines Forum

Living in The Philippines => Education in the Philippines => Topic started by: mandaluyong on January 12, 2011, 03:34:40 AM

Title: Education in the Philippines
Post by: mandaluyong on January 12, 2011, 03:34:40 AM
I have taught in private schools in Manila close to 20 years and am currently teaching in the US so you could say I have some idea about the subject. I was content with merely reading posts about how expats are faring in the Philippines, which I sorely miss, but then this topic came up and I knew I had to say something.

Before even considering the budget you need to allocate for education, try to examine the things that are important to you as a family. It is important that the school you choose values the same things. If there are any conflicts of interest, your child may just end up confused about wrong and right. Ask for the Mission and Vision statements to ensure that academic and extra-curricular activities and policies are aligned. This will also allow you to guage how well administrators manage the school so that they, as well as the teaching staff, have a clear educational direction.

This may mean you have to check out a lot of schools but you do have a better chance with the private rather than public since private schools have more elbow room when it comes to policy implementation.

I hope my suggestions help you with school-hunting. May you find more peace and happiness in the Philippines.
Title: Re: Education in the Philippines
Post by: on January 12, 2011, 03:48:03 AM
.....Ask for the Mission and Vision statements to ensure that academic and extra-curricular activities and policies are aligned. This will also allow you to guage how well administrators manage the school so that they, as well as the teaching staff, have a clear educational direction.

What they say and what they actually do can be two very different things.

We selected our daughters school mainly by locale, and budget. The school we wanted her to go to was $12,000 a year, and we simply cannot afford that.

Where she is now is not perfect, but appears adequate for what we want for her: a general decent broad based education.

Title: Re: Education in the Philippines
Post by: mandaluyong on January 12, 2011, 05:13:04 AM
As always, people will do things differently from what they say. Since there is no such thing as a perfect school, parents will have to do their share in educating their children. If parents simply could not afford an expensive private school, they could make up for it by setting a structured learning time and choosing appropriate materials. Philippine schools are still largely traditional so supplemental materials are not too hard to find.

Also, Philippine private schools that are PAASCU members are held more accountable to their Mission and Vision statements.

Again, hope this helps.
Title: Re: Education in the Philippines
Post by: hhhsands on January 12, 2011, 05:49:45 AM
We selected our daughters school mainly by locale, and budget. The school we wanted her to go to was $12,000 a year, and we simply cannot afford that.

Wow! I teach in a private university and the enrollment fee is around 6,000 Eur/year; considering all expenses the total is probably below that number. A public university cost could be 30-50%
Title: Re: Education in the Philippines
Post by: on January 12, 2011, 06:31:43 AM
As always, people will do things differently from what they say. Since there is no such thing as a perfect school, parents will have to do their share in educating their children. If parents simply could not afford an expensive private school, they could make up for it by setting a structured learning time and choosing appropriate materials. Philippine schools are still largely traditional so supplemental materials are not too hard to find.

Also, Philippine private schools that are PAASCU members are held more accountable to their Mission and Vision statements.

Again, hope this helps.

My daughter, who is nine, starts school at 07:15 and finishes at 15:00, which is a longer day than I ever did in England at school, even when I was 16.

She also brings home about two hours of homework, which I personally do not agree with/ There is no reason a nine year old should need that much extra work after her school day. We complained to the school about it, during a PTA meeting,  and they told us we are the first parents who have had a problem, but, several other parents then also stood up and agreed they too were not happy with it.

We have now enrolled our daughter in an after-school program that has teachers supervise the children doing their assignments in the school for an hour each day, four days a week.

I\'ve told the school that if she can\'t get it done in an hour, after a 7 3/4 hour school day, then it doesn\'t get done. Period.

And my wife has discretely  mentioned to the head teacher; \"if they were taught properly in school they wouldn\'t need so much homework\" :-X

One thing I find a little odd is the \'achievement\' awards/certificates that schools hand out to pupils who excel. It would appear that these are some sort of status symbol amongst certain parents in schools, and much sought after. That was one explanation for the excessive homework. Another parent pointed out to me that there have been court cases and law suits filed because children didn\'t get the awards their parents had decided they were entitled to.  ???

I\'ve told our daughters school that as long as she gets a good, well rounded education, I will be happy. I don\'t care about awards, certificates, medals and any other sort of status symbol.

\'Travel broadens the mind\', and one of the best things that ever happened to me during my school days was going to live in Singapore for three years. I sure hope my daughter finds her time in the Philippines as interesting and exciting as I did my years in Singapore.  ;D
Title: Re: Education in the Philippines
Post by: on January 12, 2011, 07:11:09 AM
my son right now leaves the house at 7am for school, gets home around 3:45(15:45).  I am very happy with his education.  He is attending a public school that has earned national blue ribbon awards.  I love this schools demand for excellence.  They do a block schedule. Do each day is only 4 classes.  Gives the teachers longer time to explain lessons and educate.  So he has A days and B days and does 8 classes a semester.  But the school does demand more time out of his day than schools that his friends go to.  But on the meap assessment testing, his school always finishes in top 3%. 
I have not problem with longer days, along with the extra homework(about 1 hour a night).  This is his job.  He gets good grades, we let him do what he wants.  But the grades come first. 
To touch on the awards thing, I hate the parents that think \"all kids\" should have an award.  Or sue over not getting awards.  Not all, but most in my world are parents that do absolutely NOTHING to further their kids education.  The kids come home and play, instead of doing homework.  And the parents do not discipline the kids to put school first.  Then whine when kids like my son are given awards.  The best i like about this school is they demand the parents are involved.  That goes a long way.  Let\'s the parents know what is going on in school and what is expected of their children.  Of my son and his friends that get awards for school, none leave them up in their rooms on displays nor desire their parents displaying them in house.  Instead they display their soccer medals and awards.  Something to the affect that their friends from other schools put up all their participation awards, and thus school awards are not as impressive because all the kids at other schools get them for just showing up, and not doing any work for them above being there.
Title: Re: Education in the Philippines
Post by: fred on January 12, 2011, 08:08:00 AM
Well its pretty close to 3rd quarter exams again (Tomorrow) and as usual the teachers go on their power trip giving the kids and parents a large list of \"requirements\" to complete when OBVIOUSLY they should be revising.
If they do not run around all day to get these lists signed by each teacher then they do not take the exams period.. This practice is very common in private schools around the R.P..

The high school day starts at 7.30 and ends at 5pm  which of course is far too long. I believe the government are trying to push through reforms that ban homework from Monday to Friday and put a stop to this stupid requirement procedure that serves no real purpose apart from stressing out the students before exams.. Last Quarter one youngster hyperventilated and passed out because of stress 30 mins before first exam ..
My kids although doing well in Math,English and Science will never receive top average grades or receive any rewards on graduation day here as they are English speaking and will always struggle with the Filipino subject..  This fact alone will mean they probably could never attend a top university like UP as a grade under 86/87% in any subject would disqualify them from entry. Absolutely ludicrous IMO..
 
Title: Re: Education in the Philippines
Post by: on January 12, 2011, 11:07:47 AM
One thing I\'m not happy about, and I don\'t blame the school for this, is the way my daughters English has been ridiculed by her school mates. She was born in the PI but grew up in the UK and she speaks real English, but now she is starting to talk in some sort of dumbed down \'kids speek\' which makes her sound somewhat like a moron. I assume it is a meld of the various accents, but predominantly Taglish.

I\'ve overheard her and her friends talking and they sound like a class from a learning difficulties school! \"Wot you doin\'?\" \"Dat over dere\", \'Where you goin\'?\"

I\'ve told her she will speaks proper English when she is in the house, but if we bump into a friend of hers when we are out she quietly drops back into \'moron\' again. Obviously she wants to fit in with the other kids, so I don\'t give her too much grief over it.
Title: Re: Education in the Philippines
Post by: fred on January 12, 2011, 11:52:09 AM
Exactly the same with my 12 year old daughter King.. She speaks in a strong American,Visayan accent to her class mates and cousins..A bit like I do when I need to speak to a local in order to be understood !
I am also very strict about her reverting to her beautiful English accent when she`s in the car or the house but still get frustrated when she forgets!
The annoying thing is that the teachers keep correcting her English pronunciations to U.S standard...
I must admit..Bloody annoying that! 
Title: Re: Education in the Philippines
Post by: Metz on December 03, 2011, 08:52:47 PM
Have you looked at schools with English language instruction?  We have our daughter enrolled in Assumption, which is a Catholic school, with most classes in English.  Our children are pretty well versed in both English and Tagalog although my son, does not do so well in his Tagalog classes as he uses English most of the time.  The local schools where we live have a lot of Korean expats so English is the common language. 

The biggest headache I have found for schools in Phil\'s is arranging transport. 
Title: Re: Education in the Philippines
Post by: trevor on December 06, 2011, 03:39:00 PM
I can definitely relate to what king said about the status symbol of some parents concerning their kids achievements in school. Last semester when my now 6 yrs. old was at another school and in kindergarden there was a group of parents who hangs out at the school all day. They sits at a table just before the class room door. Brought their camera and tape recorder and try to record everything that goes on in the class each day. One parent even had one of the teacher giving private tuition to her child. Come time for quiz B. their kids would always win. They befriend the teachers and was always giving gifts. Actually the teacher was giving them the list of questions to study for the quiz. A couple of these moms was married to a family with a very big name in the town so because of the big name quite naturally the kids have to be first in all the tests. Now my 6 yrs. old was attending this school for the first time, she is a very bright child who picks up fast. Now they sees her as treat to their status so they started to make snide remarks about my child.
One day my wife came home very upset and told me that one of the mom was calling Savannah ..A looser. These moms are adults and should not stoop so low as to call a little child a looser. So i went down to the school, walked up to their table and confronted them. Who call my child a looser? i ask. They were all shock and stared with open mouth. Then i let them have a piece of my mind. We ended up going to the directors office and trash it out.  I let them know that will not tolerated that type of statement toward my child coming from an adult. Well to make a long story short at the end of the school year we enrolled her into another school. No problem so far. The point is some parents will go to the extreme for their child to be in the top. It is like they are reliving their childhood all over again.
Title: Re: Education in the Philippines
Post by: Metz on December 07, 2011, 11:59:54 PM
I don\'t think the Catholic nuns would let that sort of behaviors go on in our daughters school.  our son used to attend some big name place in Pasig, before we escaped Cubao and the transport was too far. 

14 years old and taking pilot ground courses already.  Kids sure are expensive
Title: Re: Education in the Philippines
Post by: Lunkan on December 28, 2011, 11:25:02 PM
Is it any big difference in costs between public university and public college?

I can definitely relate to what king said about the status symbol of some parents concerning their kids achievements in school. Last semester when my now 6 yrs. old was at another school and in kindergarden there was a group of parents who hangs out at the school all day. They sits at a table just before the class room door. Brought their camera and tape recorder and try to record everything that goes on in the class each day. One parent even had one of the teacher giving private tuition to her child. Come time for quiz B. their kids would always win. They befriend the teachers and was always giving gifts. Actually the teacher was giving them the list of questions to study for the quiz. A couple of these moms was married to a family with a very big name in the town so because of the big name quite naturally the kids have to be first in all the tests. Now my 6 yrs. old was attending this school for the first time, she is a very bright child who picks up fast. Now they sees her as treat to their status so they started to make snide remarks about my child.
One day my wife came home very upset and told me that one of the mom was calling Savannah ..A looser. These moms are adults and should not stoop so low as to call a little child a looser. So i went down to the school, walked up to their table and confronted them. Who call my child a looser? i ask. They were all shock and stared with open mouth. Then i let them have a piece of my mind. We ended up going to the directors office and trash it out.  I let them know that will not tolerated that type of statement toward my child coming from an adult. Well to make a long story short at the end of the school year we enrolled her into another school. No problem so far. The point is some parents will go to the extreme for their child to be in the top. It is like they are reliving their childhood all over again.
That happened in a private school, didn\'t it?
I suppose there are big differences between different public schools, but what\'s the common quality for public ones?
Any big difference in qulity between public schools in cities and villages in average?

(At least up to around 13 years old I find it much more important they can be in a school close to home, so they have school friends living close too. But I expect it will be needed compleeting teaching by family or employed in some subjects e g computers  :)

What\'s the law about obligatoric school?
(If alloved and suiting perhaps skip some lessons and make only them private, so the total study don\'t need to be longer than for other kids.)
Title: Re: Education in the Philippines
Post by: Gray Wolf on December 28, 2011, 11:31:43 PM

What\'s the law about obligatoric school?


If you mean obligatory schooling, as far as I know there are no such laws in the Philippines.  Many extremely poor children don\'t even finish elementary school.

Welcome to the Philippines...   :P
Title: Re: Education in the Philippines
Post by: Kerry1123 on January 03, 2012, 05:57:59 AM
Education in the Philippines is really hard to quantify.   There are just so many variables...   Let me give you an example.   I invited my niece who was 16 years old and living in Quezon City (metro manila) to attend college in the US (2008).  I filled out most of the paperwork, and sponsored her on a student visa.   When she came to the US she was still 16, and started her freshman year in college.   Her first math class was trigonometry, and her other subjects were general requirements.   She completed the year with a 4.0 GPA, but she also worked harder than any of the other students.   What made her successful... hard to tell.   I think it was a combination of things...  First, her private school education in the Philippines at a catholic all girls school paid off.   Second, she had the desire to excel, and third, we had high standards and expectations for her, while she was a student here in the US.  

On the other hand, I have met many people with graduate degrees in the Philippines who appear to me to be basically illiterate.  What caused this?  Who knows, but it definitely had to do do with the schools they attended, their own desire to learn, and the type of degree program they completed.    
Title: Re: Education in the Philippines
Post by: Gray Wolf on January 03, 2012, 06:34:00 AM
My experience is similar with our nieces and nephews.  They were given the straight story about education; without it you go nowhere.  We told each of them that we would foot the bill for their tuition, but only if they showed us a strong desire to learn and to excel.  Every single one dug in and worked their butts off!  And not just in school.  At least two also worked part-time jobs to help with the bills all while attending college full time.   

We now have 3 RN\'s, 2 Industrial Engineers, 2 Tele-Communications Engineers and one who is a professor with a Masters in Computer Technology working on his doctorate.  All have great jobs, some in the RP, some in Dubai. 

Our last university student is my niece Tin-Tin who will graduate this semester from High School.  She wants to become a Chemical Engineer.  She\'s a straight-A student, top of her class and is planning to attend Mapua Insititute of Technology beginning next semester. 
She\'s been the brightest of the bunch all along and we expect big things from her.  After her tuition is set aside, we can finally \"retire\" and start seting aside money for ourselves.  ;)   :D   ;D   
Title: Re: Education in the Philippines
Post by: Lunkan on January 03, 2012, 01:57:47 PM
If you mean obligatory schooling, as far as I know there are no such laws in the Philippines.  Many extremely poor children don\'t even finish elementary school.

Welcome to the Philippines...   :P

Good - for what I thought of  :)
Then can I chose to have home schooling in some subjects 1-2 days per week, so the kids don\'t need spend extra much at studying.

Quote from: Skip Campbell
-cut-
On the other hand, I have met many people with graduate degrees in the Philippines who appear to me to be basically illiterate.  What caused this?  Who knows, but it definitely had to do do with the schools they attended, their own desire to learn, and the type of degree program they completed.
 
Proved factors in some I-countries. (In average)  :
1/ Level of parent\'s education. (=Habits of studying.) Plus better educated parents have much better chance to assist the children.
2/ Chinese parents   ;D     =The exception from p1, in the American study, was Chinese. They had much better than expected results than average. I don\'t know if the study have that conclusion, but I guess it has to do with many abroad living Chinese push their children very hard. E g one Chinese friend - before I mentioned they perhaps push their children to hard  :)   - force their children to have full school days during the weekends too.

--
In general for other nationalities too - No problem children do much IF the children REALY want themselves, but many hard pushed children breaks or revolt. I had to stop some parents from to hard pushing, when I made national team players of their children by making them have fun and improve their mental strength. (When it was  needed   :)   When one just visited the club as 5 year old, his older brothers played there, then I told he will be national champion if he chose this sport (chess). He has been youth champion 3 times.)

As the parents of the 8 year old genius Aidan (Singapore) says:
Father: Genius children can\'t be pushed by parents. It\'s the child pushing the parents to get resources enough. E g Aidan wanted a real chemistry lab when he was 6.5, but it took us 1.5 years to get access to one.
Mother: He need some balance. When it become to much, then I take him outside so he has to play.
(Then the son wrote chemistry formulas in the sand   :D

Have you heard of this Philippine 2 year old, who can read allready?!
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=FCDctJMLD2I&feature=related (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=FCDctJMLD2I&feature=related)
He use computer some already too. Perhaps I will employ him in 2 years or so  :)

BTW he live in the Bohol mountains, so it\'s possible to get brain stimulation living there too   :)