Living In The Philippines Forum

It’s Your Money => Building in the Philippines => Topic started by: paulgee on July 31, 2012, 05:11:55 AM

Title: Building our house in a sub-division
Post by: paulgee on July 31, 2012, 05:11:55 AM
Now our house in the Philippines is almost complete I thought I would write about it, over a few posts, passing on our experiences along the way.

Sub-division, condominium or elsewhere? The 3 options available generally, and a personal choice for each one of us contemplating taking the property plunge. Our circumstances at present are that we would be spending several months a year in the Philippines, maybe more time later, so a guarded sub-division was our choice. No guarantee of complete security (no such thing) but the safest in our circumstances.

San Fernando, Pampanga was where we wanted a house, near(ish) to Shirleys family without being close neighbours. Prices in the area were generally too high for us but then we found a new sub-division which was affordable and had a good mix of properties – from one to three bedroom properties. So not top end but hopefully a good mixture of people who would not all be absent expats or OFWs. Included in the sub division were a clubhouse and swimming pool.

Another important factor was that building work was continuing apace on a number of houses on site, so we would not end up in a sparsely populated sub-division, something to be aware can happen. The standard plot size was 150sqm but we bought one of the larger plots, 254sqm, so we would have a garden to enjoy. An additional cost but well worth it. The house is 3 bedroom, 3 bathroom, and a floor area of 118 sq metres, with a lanai and balcony. The house price included a ‘standard’  wall around it. Of course as we had a larger plot it was deemed non-standard so straight off we had a small extra cost to add on. Take nothing for granted, and always get everything in writing when any queries arise and an agreement made. Certainly the wall we paid for did not include the front wall, which was at our extra expense.

By agreeing to pay in 3 monthly instalments when building commenced we also got a 5% discount. We got the development company checked out, and a contact at the local council checked the land ownership details before we parted with any money. We were very fortunate to have a good real estate agent who helped with many initial queries, she promised to pay back to us some of her commission, and indeed we later received from her around P40K.

We know from previous experience that many such agents are rubbish, a relative of Shirley also put down a holding deposit on a lot on the same sub division;  when she encountered financial problems her agent was abroad for some months and the developers would not let her start again with another agent who would have helped her with Pag Ibig financing etc. She lost the non-refundable holding deposit. There is a completely different set of rules for things in the Philippines, and foreigners are not the only ones to suffer.

Building commenced in late October 2011 with an estimated completion time of 5 months. Not that we believed that, but as we would not be flying out there until the following September that was no problem. The only initial change to the standard house we selected was to add an additional 1.5 metre extension to the kitchen at the rear of the building. The developers offered a number of standard house/bungalow designs, but no self-design/build and the fact that they had some quite strict rules seemed a good idea, though there may be some downsides we will encounter. The original owner of the land has a large house on the sub division, and his sons are having houses built there, so I presume he wants it all kept fairly orderly.

Work went fairly well through the last of the wet season and Shirleys family visited regularly, sending back numerous photos. We also employed an engineer friend of theirs to visit on occasional weekends to cast his professional eye over things. We asked our brother in-law to take plenty of photos every time they visited the site, and this proved useful. We had to provide letters to the developers authorising relatives to act on our behalf whilst checking on construction.

Lessons learnt so far:

  1) If you request any alteration to a standard design, then make sure it is done. I noticed from one photo that the kitchen extension had not been built!!  As you can see from one of the photos below they had to add it on after we pointed out the error of their ways!

2) Make sure the electrical wiring includes an earth. I just caught them in time, and had to pay extra for an earthed wiring system.

3) A standard house build will only include plumbing for cold water supply, so ask for any extra pipework etc .you need before they get that far.

4) Be prepared for extra costs on things that you may think are standard. They will not be cheap and will include things you think of as basic. We paid for wiring for the electric showers and the aircon we plan to install.

5) Ask for freebies, very popular on developments apparently. We were offered some, but Shirley bargained for others as our extra costs mounted. They will often throw in a little extra work for nothing on alterations you request as labour is cheap.

6) You will see from the house plan the plot is an irregular shape. We agreed the house position as our preferred option, but in actual fact the house ended up being built 2 feet to the left of the plan! Make sure you check everything possible, at least they built it on the correct lot!!

7) Finally, I am not a very practical person regarding building, electrics, plumbing etc. Even so it all fell on my shoulders to pick up on the various things above. The bottom line is that Filipinos will often not be aware of what we want, expect or need in a house so the ultimate responsibility rests with you to ensure you end up with what you want.

Paul
Title: Re: Building our house in a sub-division
Post by: Art, just a re(tired) Fil-Am on July 31, 2012, 06:35:30 AM
We retired in the Philippines in 1998 in Sta Rosa, Laguna and bought a plot of land of only 187 sq meters with just the basic 3 bdrm floor plan, 2 ba (steel frame, prefab exterior walls with gypsum interior walls/ceilings, Spanish tile roofing, garage not  included) for P2.5 million in a gated community with a community pool, basketball court and 2 clubhouses, with the Ayala Corporation aka Avida today. There aren\'t any homes in our subdivision going for under P6 million today! One of our neighbor/friends from the Middle East has a floor plan similar to ours and they\'re selling their home for P7 million. So, property value has increased in 10 yrs time!
It cost us an additional P1 million when labor and materials was still reasonable to have our home finished in and out including a 2 car garage and a laundry/bonus room. Everything has gone up in cost of materials by at least  40% or more and labor costs just up slightly since then in 1999!
After all was said and done, we moved into our new home in 2001 and we\'ve lived here ever since.
Our area has really transformed into a nice place to live and other subdivisions and developments are still in the making and still expanding! It\'s becoming to be another Alabang in the making!  

https://www.google.com/search?q=Paseo+de+Sta+Rosa&hl=en&rlz=1G1TSNA_ENPH407&prmd=imvns&tbm=isch&tbo=u&source=univ&sa=X&ei=7U-iTseWF4SuiQe75cHMBg&ved=0CGIQsAQ&biw=1399&bih=794

https://www.google.com/search?q=pictures+of+thailand&hl=en&rlz=1G1TSNA_ENPH407&prmd=imvns&tbm=isch&tbo=u&source=univ&sa=X&ei=UcMmT536HvPZiQL9zMzdBg&sqi=2&ved=0CD0QsAQ&biw=1166&bih=661#q=pictures+of+Nuvali+Laguna+philippines&hl=en&rlz=1G1TSNA_ENPH407&tbm=isch&bav=on.2,or.r_gc.r_pw.r_cp.r_qf.,cf.osb&fp=eb7918b523931dff&biw=1344&bih=762
Title: Re: Building our house in a sub-division
Post by: Lee2 on July 31, 2012, 06:40:01 AM
Looks nice, the best of luck with it.
Title: Re: Building our house in a sub-division
Post by: paulgee on July 31, 2012, 04:08:05 PM
Art,

You are right about property prices. I wish I had bought when I first visited the Philippines 4 years ago, prices in our area have gone up a lot since then. But first I had to secure myself a wife!! And the way house purchases are structured there I don\'t think it is a bubble which is likely to burst. Hopefully anyway!

Paul
Title: Re: Building our house in a sub-division
Post by: Art, just a re(tired) Fil-Am on July 31, 2012, 06:04:37 PM
Quote from: \"paulgee\" post=46791
Art,

You are right about property prices. I wish I had bought when I first visited the Philippines 4 years ago, prices in our area have gone up a lot since then. But first I had to secure myself a wife!! And the way house purchases are structured there I don\'t think it is a bubble which is likely to burst. Hopefully anyway!

Paul
Paul,

A bubble per say can also burst here in the Philippines, because prices are really getting out of hand in some areas of the Philippines where homes and high end condos are sometimes beyond the reach of your average Filipino or retired expat on a fixed source of income, but at least for now we aren\'t concerned about it, because we are settled in and our home is paid for outright!

Art
Title: Re: Building our house in a sub-division
Post by: Lee2 on July 31, 2012, 08:18:57 PM
I too think the bubble has to burst but with the amount of OFW sending money home growing yearly and the money they send growing yearly and with more and more expats moving to the Philippines or helping family buy property, then it may never burst unless the inflow of those funds ends or at least slows down.

We bought our condos 6 years ago and the price has doubled since then but what is worse is the exchange rate has gone against most of us quite a bit too, so it is sort of a double whammy for people to buy now. I believe the exchange was 48.6 to $1 or so when we bought and today around 42 to $1. I am glad we bought when we did but I too wish we had bought sooner because if we would have bought just a few months sooner then we would have paid thousands of dollars less.
Title: Re: Building our house in a sub-division
Post by: suzukig1 on August 01, 2012, 01:32:28 PM
Quote from: \"paulgee\" post=46791
Art,

You are right about property prices. I wish I had bought when I first visited the Philippines 4 years ago, prices in our area have gone up a lot since then. But first I had to secure myself a wife!! And the way house purchases are structured there I don\'t think it is a bubble which is likely to burst. Hopefully anyway!

Paul


One way for the real estate bubble to burst is if the peso gets too strong.  Most new home purchases in the Phl (greater than 50%) are purchased with OFW funds.  Most of those with loans.  If the peso gets too strong there could be many unable to keep up with their payments because it would take more dollars to maintain the payments.
Title: Re: Building our house in a sub-division
Post by: Art, just a re(tired) Fil-Am on August 01, 2012, 10:23:56 PM
The question would then be, if the housing market bubble ever did burst here in the Philippines, would one rather be renting or living in your own home that\'s already paid for? Living in a home that\'s paid for is one less problem to worry about! And if one has bought a huge home with a large monthly mortgage, one may never see the end of it of ever paying it off or may even loose one\'s home when the economy and unemployment gets worst!
Title: Re: Building our house in a sub-division
Post by: Gray Wolf on August 01, 2012, 10:24:01 PM
Excellent post Paul!  I\'m really looking forward to your next installment!  
Great tips!   :)
Title: Re: Building our house in a sub-division
Post by: paulgee on August 12, 2012, 05:28:28 AM
House build months 3-5

Apart from the problems outlined in my first post the house build was going ok; with Shirleys family visiting the site almost daily we were getting photos and reports regularly. Concrete had been poured for the floor upstairs and the roof was being put on soon.

We had a choice of roof colour, the reds  and blues were popular on the sub division but bearing in mind the sunshine and heat I wanted the lightest and most reflective colour there was. This turned out to be a creamy ivory shade which was fairly neutral. Having selected this not so popular roof colour the construction was subsequently delayed as they took their time ordering it.

There was mains drainage on the development, via presumably a septic tank in our front garden (see photo), so fingers crossed that would all work ok. I was coming to the conclusion that having a house built there was an act of faith, even allowing for the fact that we were doing our best to get it checked. At least the engineer that we had employed confirmed that the quality of the hollow blocks and concrete etc  used were of good quality. I was also hoping that the continuous presence of our family there would keep the workers on their toes!

Being  completed near us was the same model house that we were having built and it had embellishments, arches at the front and additional external tiling etc. Taking the best parts of that we requested some improvements to our design (as photo). This was duly completed at an extra cost, but was well worth it. Not being there I think we missed out on lots of small amendments and improvements ie on requesting wiring for such things as security and balcony lighting, plus maybe a few more inside sockets, and things we probably won’t think of until we are out there next month.

Now the carcass of the house was done, and the roof fitted. I presume it was metal, but there was a coating of foam on the underside, a sop to insulation (photo) The kitchen was under construction (photo), to Shirleys design, so now just a big push to complete things was required.


Lessons learnt mid term:

1)   However much family/hired experts check things and have authorisation to act on your behalf it is not the same as being on site yourself. Check out the photo of the weird kitchen roof result which was built against our wishes! We would later have problems with this as I will write about next. Shirley started a series of phone calls to the architect there to ‘clarify’ queries.

2)   A tremendous amount of time is taken up selecting colours/tile designs/finishes etc. Be prepared to waste hours online making an effort to stay on top of things as building progresses. Similarly, the lines of communications when directing plumbers/electricians etc via family there is painful.

3)   Anything, or everything, which is non-standard to the build will be an immense hassle to arrange, and probably not finish up as what you requested.

4)   You will need a determined and switched on wife/girlfriend to help push through this phase as much as the start and finish. But from what I normally read on the forum most guys seem to have partners with said qualities. Only once, towards the end of the build did I feel I needed to speak over the phone to the development architect. More on that later.
 
Paul
Title: Re: Building our house in a sub-division
Post by: bigrod on August 12, 2012, 08:37:54 AM
Paul,

In regards to additional sockets.  Our house was built with single sockets through out.  We replaced the single socket with double sockets at minimal cost.

Chuck
Title: Re: Building our house in a sub-division
Post by: Lee2 on August 12, 2012, 09:16:21 AM
Looks good Paul, we wish you lots of luck with the project. You are a better man than I am because we just had upgrades done and we had to be on top of the workers continually or they cut every corner they could. They even brought my wife to tears one time when she continually told them them not to do something and they just kept doing it until I called the contractor and told him to get his butt down to our condo or I was going to toss his workmen off our balcony. I guess he thought I was serious  :evil: because the guys phone rang and he stopped doing it immediately after that and told me he would be back to finish the job the next day with the right supplies.

I caught them working on scaffolds with uncovered steel legs dragging it across the floor on brand new tile and I had to demand they put down cardboard which I had to supply. I also had to make them replaces some of the damaged tiles.

They also were not putting on the termite coat of liquid on the wood trim and I had to stop them from putting it up until they coated it., just lazy on their part trying to get the job done sooner.

 There were many more items including failure to put a shut off on the split aircon outside unit that had been agreed upon before the job started and which they tried to charge me extra for until I refused to pay the balance without it there. We were in a standoff for weeks until they saw I was not going to pay, so they finally installed the shut offs.

I am not sure I would want to go through that again but I learned a lot and the contractor learned I would not put up with any of his workers bs because I was willing to pay his price and expected the work do be done correctly, so we got along much better when I had them do my friends apartment.
Title: Re: Building our house in a sub-division
Post by: Art, just a re(tired) Fil-Am on August 12, 2012, 11:56:47 AM
When our home build was under way and our upstairs master bdrm was suitable to move into, I did so that I could be around everyday to over see the remainder of the build!
After all was said and done, the contractor lost out on about 25% of the contract, because of all the labor\'s screw ups and jobs I had them redo to my satisfaction!

Title: Re: Building our house in a sub-division
Post by: Lee2 on August 12, 2012, 12:19:02 PM
Quote from: \"Art2ro\" post=46988
When our home build was under way and our upstairs master bdrm was suitable to move into, I did so that I could be around everyday to over see the remainder of the build!
After all was said and done, the contractor lost out on about 25% of the contract, because of all the labor\'s screw ups and jobs I had them redo to my satisfaction!

Just click on the upper L/H photo after the page uploads


Looks nice Art, sort of like an American home might look.

Good you stayed on top of the workmen, that way less things that will have to be redone in the future because you got them done right the first time.
Title: Re: Building our house in a sub-division
Post by: Art, just a re(tired) Fil-Am on August 12, 2012, 02:31:07 PM
Yes, we live in a nice simple little house with a low maintenance yard and we\'re centrally located to almost everything we need in our area that\'s just walking distance without the need of a vehicle, but we do have my \"Little Red\" 1979 Toyota to putt around in just in town!
Luckily our area isn\'t susceptible to flooding during any typhoons that have come our way in the past 14 yrs including the recent Typhoon Gener. \"Knock on wood\"! We\'re just thankful!
Title: Re: Building our house in a sub-division
Post by: BudM on August 13, 2012, 03:35:52 AM
Looks good Art.  That is like what I would be interested in.  Nothing elaborate.  Modest, quaint, comfortable inside and out with nice surroundings and convenience.  But, yeah, some condos can have their upside.  Fact is though, even after I get there, I am still taking a few years to scope it all out before I would make a decision.
Title: Re: Building our house in a sub-division
Post by: paulgee on August 13, 2012, 04:19:43 AM
Chuck, whilst I \'think\' we have double sockets I am not really sure. When we arrive there next month and see it for the first time we will find that out - plus a whole lot more I imagine!!

Lee, whilst we got some upgrades done there are a host of things I know we will find out shortly that we would have got done had we been in residence locally there during construction. I haven\'t heard of termite coat for woodwork, I don\'t know whether we had that on our house, but probably not. Termite protection was one of those things I was going to enquire about when we got there.
   We have had split aircon installed - what is a shut off, that you mentioned?

Art, it is always nice to hear that someone is happily settled in their house in the Philippines, it gives hope to people such as me, and other members, that it is all worth fighting for. We have relatives living in Cabuyao, is that anywhere your area of Laguna?

Bud, I agree that taking your time is the way to go - repent at leisure as they say. Our purchase was 3 years in the making, and only after we found the ideal house in the ideal sub division at the right price for us - ie relatively inexpensive. The area as a whole suffers from being close to Angeles and many sub divisions are charging bloated prices, or so it seems to us.

Paul
Title: Re: Building our house in a sub-division
Post by: Lee2 on August 13, 2012, 04:30:16 AM
Quote from: \"paulgee\" post=46996

Lee, whilst we got some upgrades done there are a host of things I know we will find out shortly that we would have got done had we been in residence locally there during construction. I haven\'t heard of termite coat for woodwork, I don\'t know whether we had that on our house, but probably not. Termite protection was one of those things I was going to enquire about when we got there.
   We have had split aircon installed - what is a shut off, that you mentioned?

Paul


Lots of uncontrolled termites in the Philippines, get the wood coated ASAP IMHO but I think it would have been better if done before installed and painted. Raw wood face in is very edible to termites.

An AC shut off switch should be outside next to the unit on every split type system for safety reasons and to make it easier for the repairmen to be safe when working on them.

[attachment=71]acshutoff.JPG[/attachment]
Title: Re: Building our house in a sub-division
Post by: Art, just a re(tired) Fil-Am on August 13, 2012, 10:02:56 AM
Quote from: \"paulgee\" post=46996


Art, it is always nice to hear that someone is happily settled in their house in the Philippines, it gives hope to people such as me, and other members, that it is all worth fighting for. We have relatives living in Cabuyao, is that anywhere your area of Laguna?

Paul


Cabuyao is about 2 miles from Sta Rosa off the SLEX exit just before the City of Canlubang and Calamba, but coming from Balibago on the national highway, it\'s about 3 miles. Just recently Cabuyao has been designated as a City and the Mayor sponsored a little celebration at their city hall with a handful of top Filipino singers, like Jed Madela and Rachelle Ann Go and TV host Vhong Navarro. My wife attended the celebration just last week with a friend of hers who was a college classmate of the wife of the Mayor. They had a good time even though it was pouring down
rain from Typhoon Gener!

Not the actual song they sung at Cubuyao, but just to show
who they are: Jed Madela & Rachelle Ann Go, both are
Asia/International singing champions!
[video]http://http://youtu.be/cWLSLRdb3NY[/video]
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cWLSLRdb3NY&feature=related

And about termites, they are a nuisance! Any non hard wood should be treated before installation!
Title: Re: Building our house in a sub-division
Post by: paulgee on September 18, 2012, 02:42:30 PM
House Build – final months

As we got toward the end of the build we found out that the water pressure for our sub division, and also adjacent ones, was quite poor. It was doubtful our electric showers upstairs would get the pressure needed to work, especially at times of increased demand. So we did what a few other homeowners had done, and had a well drilled, to 120 feet, and water pumped up to a pressurised tank. This went well, the water quality is supposedly  good, we will get it tested when we are there. But, the cost we paid did not include joining it to our house water supply, another lesson learnt in checking what we were paying for, though my brother-in-law there did do that for us.

Another item which was not included in the cost of the house was … drainpipes! The developers fitted guttering all round but just left that. It would have cost another P15k for them to supply and fit all the drainpipes, but again my brother-in-law came to the rescue, buying the drainpipes, borrowing ladders from the developers and fitting them with the help of a friend. Cost, less than a quarter of the previous quote.

Because we would only be part-time occupants for security we had metal grills fitted to all doors and windows. The same local local metalworkers also made stainless steel railings for the lanai, then front gates and the railing for the front wall, we had paid the developers to build a front wall, this not being included in the previous amount we had paid towards the boundary walls.

We wanted our boundary walls painted before the imminent rainy season, but the local painters our family there contacted obviously thought we were stupid rich, and quoted a price accordingly. The developers quoted less (that was a first for them!) and we waited for that to be done. With a deadline imminent it proved hard to get them started, and for the only time I myself phoned the chief architect there to complain, nicely of course, and request they get going. This did the trick and the walls were finished just before the first deluges.

We decided on Panasonic split inverter type aircon units. We already had a ‘freebie’ unit fitted in the smallest bedroom by the developers, standard type not inverter. I am not a technical person but scouring the internet for info and tables on calculating the hp of units required for various rooms gave me some knowledge so that when the shop guys came to assess our house I felt reasonably happy with their recommendations. I know they are supposedly usually quoting for larger units than required I was happy with their estimations. But, very expensive outlay that I hope we appreciate when we are there. For the record we have a 2 ½ hp unit in the lounge area, which is open plan downstairs, and 1 hp and 1 ½ hp in the two other bedrooms upstairs.

We also had mosquito mesh fitted over  all windows, so we could enjoy whatever breezes there were without being eaten alive my mossies. This cost a very reasonable P11500, considering it included about 12 windows. As with everything else though we look forward to seeing the quality ourselves next week.

Surprisingly enough it was cheaper to order all our furniture from a company in Manila. The exact same items were 20% more expensive from local companies around San Fernando. I presume that being near Angeles we may suffer from slightly higher prices on things such as this

. Of course delivery day coincided with the extreme wet weather when half Manila was flooded, but 2 weeks later it was there. Some of the woods used were not as advertised, so we have a mish-mash of conflicting colours in the bedrooms, and I look forward to seeing the quality of the furniture.

There is a previous thread about the lawn we had laid, that is the only thing benefiting from the current rainy season!

Lessons learnt by the finish:

We paid P3M for the house and lot, I don’t have an exact breakdown of extra costs, but overall it has cost something over P4M to get ready for occupation. The developers started work in October 2011, it is now September 2012 and now just ready for occupation.

Not being there we were unable to stop the aircon fitters standing on our kitchen roof, and causing damage, the same having previously happening when painters used it.

Do not go down the route we did, if you are not living there, or without the wholehearted support and assistance of family there. Without their endless help and support we would have ended up with a much inferior house and without the numerous things which will make life in the house easier for us.

When we arrive there in a few days time I will be interested to see how my opinions change!

Paul

.
Title: Re: Building our house in a sub-division
Post by: Art, just a re(tired) Fil-Am on September 18, 2012, 04:40:31 PM
Paul,

Nice house! All I can suggest is, during the next strong winds and rain, see how your windows and sliding doors will fair if the rain will seep in around the edges! That\'s the main problem we have with our windows whenever we encounter strong winds and rain, but it\'s not too bad! I just wished we would of installed double pane and waterproof windows like in the U.S., but they are awfully expensive and we have large windows throughout the house! We don\'t have any sliding glass doors in our home for that reason, where as most of our neighbors do and that\'s what their problems are, water seeking in through the edges of their glass sliding doors during hurricanes!  
Just a thought you may like to know!

Art
Title: Re: Building our house in a sub-division
Post by: Lee2 on September 18, 2012, 08:59:16 PM
Looks very nice. Beautiful home!

One suggestion I would like to make is for you to bring caulking color coordinated if possible since I have seen most a/c units installed without caulking there and from the picture the one through the wall looks like it too lacks caulking.

On the split unit, I wonder why they ran all the way around the window with the hookup instead of taking the short run down the other side but maybe there was a reason? Make sure they secured the outside unit to those brackets, I have also seen where all the do is put the unit on the brackets with just a screw or two and that will not do much in a storm to hold it in place.
Title: Re: Building our house in a sub-division
Post by: BingColin on September 19, 2012, 08:23:51 AM
Your house looks good, I like the large window, and the colour scheme is a lot nicer than the Filipino \'coat of many colours\'  :cheer:

We used Samsung 0.5 hp aircons in the guest bedrooms and study, mainly because they are very shallow and only project a few inches outside the house. They have proved more than adequate, I imagine the insulated walls help a lot. We don\'t have any aircon in our large master bedroom, we made provision for a split unit, but it has proved unnecessary. We don\'t even use a fan most of the time.

We found the opposite with water pressure. We installed a pump and pressure tank instead of the usual water tower, but found that the mains pressure is higher. The pump is set to 40psi, but when we bypass it during a brown out it increases to over 60psi.

We did not get drainpipes fitted either and had to get them added later, it would seem that just holes in the guttering is the way it is done here. Unfortunately the guttering was installed parallel to the ground so overflow during heavy rain. It will all have to be taken down and reinstalled at some time.

We don\'t have any problems with leaking windows, but the builders did not put any slope on our covered porch and during heavy rain with strong winds our entrance hall got flooded. We had to fit canopies over the front and side.
Title: Re: Building our house in a sub-division
Post by: hitekcountry on January 17, 2013, 12:38:25 PM
In reply #9 there is a picture of the septic tank. Something doesn’t look right. In a septic tank the inlet pipe will sit higher than the outflow pipe. So if you look at the picture, the pipe on the upper left looks to be flush with the top of the tank and the pipe on the far right looks to be about 1 ½ inches lower. That would imply the left chamber is the primary side and the one on the right the secondary. But the chamber on the left is smaller than the one on the right. That would be wrong, the primary chamber should be larger. Also the fitting in the partition wall is placed as though the chamber on the right is the primary chamber. If liquids are flowing from left to right then that fitting is going to cause problems.

Or maybe the top isn’t level and the right side is the inlet.
 
If the left side pipe is the inlet, this septic tank will not function properly.
 
Here is a link to what it should look like.

http://ccwd.com.ph/Latest_News.php?id=14
Title: Re: Building our house in a sub-division
Post by: wildbill on January 18, 2013, 09:20:13 PM
I was looking at your septic tank and I remember the way we do them in the usa and mine looks different than yours mine is two tanks just like yours one inlet with a over flow hole to the other side mine was dug 10 feet deep he said its the way its done here they need to hit sand bottom I dont know but not like in the usa we are not allowed to throw tissue in at all.any one with the same kinda of tank as me?
Title: Re: Building our house in a sub-division
Post by: medic3500 on January 19, 2013, 10:42:56 AM
If a septic tank is installed correctly and maintained you surely can flush toilet paper. Do not put bleach in the drains that go to the septic as it kills the bacteria that feeds on on the good stuff. As a safety measure I flushed a couple packets of yeast monthly to maintain the proper yeast bacteria levels which breaks down all the solids to include toilet paper. Only time I had a problem with my stateside septic was after I decided to repaint the inside of the house and cleaned all the brushes and rollers in the bathroom shower. The paint which was water based did go down the drain fine but ended up solidifying and clogging up the entrance to the septic tank. Was a quick fix just had to dig down about a foot to where the lid to the septic was, take the lid off and clean the drain also had it pumped out at that time which according to the sucker guy didn't need to be done as it was working just fine. It was the first time in five years that it had been cleaned out. I then installed an extension ring so the opening was just above ground level in the event that I ever had problems again which I didn't before moving here.
Title: Re: Building our house in a sub-division
Post by: wildbill on January 19, 2013, 08:04:03 PM
my tank is just two holes 10 ft  deep until they hit sand no drainage feilds like in the usa is your like this too.
Title: Re: Building our house in a sub-division
Post by: Art, just a re(tired) Fil-Am on January 19, 2013, 11:27:29 PM
When our home was built, the developers had the huge Poly type septic tanks installed with a water over flow system into our culvert's water drain system as the standard throughout our subdivision! We haven't had any problems with our septic tank system in the 12 yrs we lived here! Our subdivision has an effective water drainage system and we haven't experience any flooding in our area. 

Title: Re: Building our house in a sub-division
Post by: medic3500 on January 20, 2013, 08:10:57 PM
@ WildBill, After rereading your post I realized I had misread it. My septic was the standard duel concrete tank. Solids into first tank which then broke down and the gray water into the second chamber then into a drainage field which was 4 20' side by side 2" PVC pipes with 1/4" holes on the bottom. These were placed on gravel and sand. Sorry for bad eyesight.
Title: Re: Building our house in a sub-division
Post by: wildbill on January 20, 2013, 09:35:53 PM
its okay there medic things here are just done so differently I really hope my septic does okay it has no drainage fields when I asked my contractor why not he said its the way its done here and he explained he yoost to work as a contractor in the usa but nothing he does is like usa standards idk about him ,o -well its only the two of us living here.thanks for your input take care..
Title: Re: Building our house in a sub-division
Post by: hitekcountry on January 21, 2013, 03:59:48 AM
Wildbill
 
What is the width of the holes and what are the walls constructed of?
 
If the bottoms are “open” for drainage then there is no point in having two chambers.

What I’m getting the sense of is  that there is some lack of understand in the general (construction) population in the field of waste treatment/septic systems.
 
Medic3500

The description of your system appears to be a properly designed system.
Title: Re: Building our house in a sub-division
Post by: Gray Wolf on January 21, 2013, 07:37:12 AM
WildBill,

What you are describing is the typical pinoy "that's how it's done here" syndrome.  Nope, it's not the way we do it back home.

 
Medic3500 wrote: "If a septic tank is installed correctly and maintained you surely can flush toilet paper."

This is one reason why we discuss things like using the tabo instead of TP.  The pinoy systems are not designed the same as those you are accustomed to unless you pay extra, design it and supervise the installation. 


This is one of the things that drives some people to drink...  a lot!   :)


 
Title: Re: Building our house in a sub-division
Post by: Art, just a re(tired) Fil-Am on January 21, 2013, 03:23:55 PM
If one doesn't incorporate a leach field or some sort of over flow drainage system, one has to have an enclosed type of septic tank with live microorganisms to breakdown the waste and will require more frequent flushing/cleaning.
It's a real shame that the main cause of contaminated underground water is the seepage of waste from leaking old poorly maintained septic tanks! The Philippines is way behind in the sewage and water system management and lack the needed water & sewage treatment plants for every rural provinces, small towns and cities! People and animals will continue to die from their own waste and filth unless sanitation improves in their perspective areas of responsibility or by government intervention in order to improve the lives of the entire local populace of the Philippines!   

Click on below to the video clips to see what I mean: 
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5jr6kIAewm4
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_-9K36uKzs8

 

     
Title: Re: Building our house in a sub-division
Post by: wildbill on January 21, 2013, 08:35:15 PM
thanks I will just wait and see if the poo stays put LOL you know my contractor said why dont I also construct my dirty kitchen rite on top of my septic tank so I would not have to pour another foundation for the kitchen.I d k ..:) im making some adjustments here and sacrifices I even made my own carcoal once thats the country Boy in me I guess.:) or is it RED NECK po .
Title: Re: Building our house in a sub-division
Post by: richardsinger on January 21, 2013, 09:01:49 PM
I had to research into local septic tank practices last year, couldn't see any discussion about this on the forum at the time.

A proper septic tank has 2 chambers (usually) and a drain-field. The chambers are concrete and do not (should not) leak into the ground, except via the drain-field. The drain-field is a system of perforated pipes laid in gravel about 1 meter below the surface, and to work properly, needs to cover quite a large area.

Since it is common for houses to be built here on very small lot areas, there is simply no space for a drain-field and so a different system is practiced for local conditions. If you are lucky, your area may have a district sewage pipe nearby (usually referred to as a culvert) and you may connect your black water outlet to that.

If there is no district sewer, then instead of a septic tank, what is often constructed is a sess-pool. This is basically a deep hole in the ground, and to be safe it should have concrete walls. But these walls should also allow water to escape to leach into the soil, so they can be constructed from pre-cast concrete pipe sections (around 4 - 6 feet in diameter) that have holes in the sides to let the water through. Or hollow blocks can be used, with separation between the blocks to allow the water to pass. If the soil is clay it will not let the water through, so the hole has to be dug deeper until there is sandy soil which will leach the water away. The base of the hole is not concreted so there will be leeching through the base too.

Many builders don't bother to build any side walls at all, so there is a risk of the sess-pool collapsing after several years, due to underground water eroding the soil walls and the weight of the concrete slab on the top.

As far as I can tell from a brief scan of the building regulations, a sess-pool is only allowed as a temporary (less than 2 years) waste disposal system until a district sewer pipe is available so that a permanent solution can be achieved. But of course this is never enforced in practice and there are many many long-term sess-pools around.

Depending on the nature of the soil and the depth of the hole, a sess-pool can be used for years without requiring to be pumped out. My neighbour's house is 12 years old and so far he has never had to have this done. But eventually the outlet seepage will slow down. In my city you can see quite a few small signs around on roadside poles, advertising "sip sip pose-negro". This is the pumping service you will need to call if your sess-pool gets backed up. I believe they will also try to clean the sides and base of the sess-pool but that might require the top slab to be removed to provide proper access. Baho!

Another common practice by some builders is to connect an overflow pipe from the sess-pool to the nearest rainwater drain outside the lot. This is explicitly prohibited in building regulations, but this is Philippines right?

As far as toilet paper is concerned, I would not risk it. The locals I know always seem to take care not to flush toilet paper so I believe there is a good reason for it. Anything that slows down the leaching process must be a bad idea.

Sorry for the long post. Hope at least it can help someone to ask a few probing questions and detect builder's BS before they end up with a big smelly problem.

Richard



Title: Re: Building our house in a sub-division
Post by: Gray Wolf on January 22, 2013, 01:32:27 AM
Excellent post Richard!  Don't worry about length, it's the content that matters.  You have given everyone a very good insight into the difference between "what should be" and "what is".


Title: Re: Building our house in a sub-division
Post by: hitekcountry on January 22, 2013, 06:55:57 AM
This is very much what my interest is in knowing the “what is”.
 
Growing up in the country my first experience with septic systems was helping my father build a septic tank (inspected and approved by the county) and later owning my own home and dealing with septic tank and leach lines, I have some experience in this area.

It’s obvious why the country (RP) has water quality/contamination problem.

Another area I have questions about is the “what is” condition for wells that are the water supply. As an example here in the U.S. you can’t have a well and any part of a septic system any closer than 100ft apart.  I strongly suspect if you were to use that as a standard there it is likely violated quite often.

What would be the common types of wells in the RP.  Are they hand dug brick lined? Are they drilled wells with PVC or steel casing? And is there some standard practice as to distance separation from well to septic?
Title: Re: Building our house in a sub-division
Post by: FMSINC on January 22, 2013, 08:17:20 AM
Hi in the Brgy standard water well is hand dug and not line depth is usually 8 feet or so

I have seen water wells within 15 feet of the septic tank but most do not have  a septic tank they just have open pit when its full they dig another hole.

Even in large subdivisions there is no sewage treatment plant each house has its own septic tank (Pinoy Style) even the island of Boracay is like this all sewage ends up in the aquifer or the sea

My advice is do not drink the water from any well and watch where you swim in the ocean make sure there is not a raw sewage outlet near where you swim

Remember it is always more Fun in the Philippines

Best Regards

Tom / Roxas City
Title: Re: Building our house in a sub-division
Post by: richardsinger on January 22, 2013, 09:02:12 AM
The building regs do cover the distance between "septic tank" and streams or underground wells, but enforcement is always the big problem here.

Probably for that very reason, all the subdivisions I have seen with "deep well" water supply do not class the water as drinkable. People use it for washing though, and also washing up dirty dishes. Makes you wonder.

Richard
Title: Re: Building our house in a sub-division
Post by: hitekcountry on January 22, 2013, 10:22:17 AM
The pumping services referred to in post #34, are these guys regulated in any way as to where they dump the “product” or is it possible/likely  that they might just take and dump it at the closest river or open field?  >:(
Title: Re: Building our house in a sub-division
Post by: richardsinger on January 22, 2013, 03:50:29 PM
The pumping services referred to in post #34, are these guys regulated in any way as to where they dump the “product” or is it possible/likely  that they might just take and dump it at the closest river or open field?  >:(

They are supposed to take it to a waste water treatment plant, maybe they even have a treatment plant as part of their business. Hopefully enforcement for this industry is better than it is for builders.

Richard
Title: Re: Building our house in a sub-division
Post by: Gray Wolf on January 23, 2013, 01:37:11 AM
In Novaliches, we had a well drilled with a steel casing.  A pump and pressurized tank was attached topside.  It cost us about $800.  The water is used only for watering plants, doing laundry, washing the walkways.  Everyone drinks bottled water.  Last year they were attached to Maynila Water and use it for cooking, showers, toilets. 
Title: Re: Building our house in a sub-division
Post by: hitekcountry on January 23, 2013, 02:46:03 AM
In Novaliches, we had a well drilled with a steel casing.  A pump and pressurized tank was attached topside.  It cost us about $800.  The water is used only for watering plants, doing laundry, washing the walkways.  Everyone drinks bottled water.  Last year they were attached to Maynila Water and use it for cooking, showers, toilets. 
So even municipal water supply is not to be trusted?  :-\

Grey wolf  -- How much of the $800 was for drilling the well and installing the casing? How deep was the well?

 I’m thinking the water table maybe high enough to easily mix with ground level water and septic which maybe some of the problem.
Title: Re: Building our house in a sub-division
Post by: Gray Wolf on January 23, 2013, 04:01:54 AM
The municipal water supply in most cities is not to be trusted for drinking.  It varies widely depending on province, etc, but I wouldn't trust it completely.  Everyone I know drinks bottled water, a lot of it supplied by local "filling stations" where filtered water is sold.  They offer free jugs that attach to the filling station apparatus.  Relatively inexpensive and good quality water, at least in our barangay in phase three. 

With our well they hit an aquifer at 45 feet, I think.  This was near the top of the ridge the barangay sits on.  The price included everything, drilling, casing, pump and tank.  This was about 9-10 years ago. 
Title: Re: Building our house in a sub-division
Post by: fred on January 23, 2013, 06:15:07 AM
Our well in Cavite is 80 Meters deep.. GI pipe with nylon pipe casing.
The 3 chamber septic tanks grey water goes (I think) straight into the creek!
Title: Re: Building our house in a sub-division
Post by: richardsinger on January 23, 2013, 08:32:12 AM
In Lipa City, Batangas and Lucena City, Quezon, my friends all drink tap water from the local municipal supply. I always try to drink bottled water but I think over time I have also been given tap water and ice made from tap water. So far no problem, but I think in other areas it could be a different story.

Richard
Title: Re: Building our house in a sub-division
Post by: wildbill on January 23, 2013, 08:56:47 AM
when I first came to the philippines the water killed me many many trips to the CR up at nite with bad stomach pains...even thow I drank wilkins water idk but now im doing just fine .I think you have to ajust for awhile but first timers should buy wilkins and boil it if they still have a problem...my well is 50 feet deep we use it for only washing and taking a shower we buy from the local water station ...
Title: Re: Building our house in a sub-division
Post by: Art, just a re(tired) Fil-Am on January 23, 2013, 02:13:57 PM
Here In our subdivision in Sta Rosa, Laguna we have our own district water treatment plant, Sta Rosa Water Works (SRWW) http://www.ayalaproperty.com.ph/portfolio_ww.asp
and our tap water is fit to drink, but we still prefer buying our drinking water to be on the safe side!
Title: Re: Building our house in a sub-division
Post by: medic3500 on January 24, 2013, 04:02:03 PM
When I first arrived the GF was insistent on me drinking bottled water. That lasted about a week. I'm in Novaliches and you can actually smell the chlorine in the tap water usually in the late evening so it's being treated somewhere along the pipeline. Been drinking it for months now and haven't keeled over. Not saying it is good for you, it just hasn't killed me.
Title: Re: Building our house in a sub-division
Post by: fred on January 24, 2013, 06:03:34 PM
We pay 15 Pesos for a 5 gallon refill of purified water.. Why drink tap water when treated water can be that cheap?
I remember in the 1980`s just how widespread and common Typhoid fever was in Manila back then when water purification businesses were not operating..
Tap water? Forget it!
Title: Re: Building our house in a sub-division
Post by: richardsinger on January 24, 2013, 07:35:46 PM
Actually Fred I have doubts about what you are getting when you buy "purified" water. Our local supplier claims that their water passes through multiple stages of filtration, including reverse osmosis. However the mineral deposits inside my coffee machine make me wonder if the water is filtered at all. And we pay 30 pesos per 5 gallon bottle.

Richard
Title: Re: Building our house in a sub-division
Post by: BingColin on January 24, 2013, 08:27:03 PM
Drain fields are not practical for most suburban type houses so we used a three chamber system. We built two septic tanks, one each side of the house because the house is wide but not deep. They are more than 2 metres deep, the first, the digester chamber, is 1.5 x 1 metre, the second, the settlement tank, is about 1 metre square. These two are sealed at the bottom but the third has an open bottom to act as a soak away. This is about 1 metre square and also takes the grey water from the showers and sinks.

When we had the dirty kitchen built, the builder made a separate soak away but it is far too small. When money permits, we will build a good hollow block toilet and shower room for the maids on the end of the dirty kitchen followed by a good block built bedroom for the maid to replace the nipa hut we now have. I will then have a large and deep soak away placed behind this building to take an overflow from the septic tank third chamber with all the other grey water pipes connected to it.

One mistake most builders make here is to connect the grey water from the showers etc. to the toilet pipes which then goes into the digester chamber. We had to get our builder to remove and reroute a lot of the plumbing to avoid this.

We have a distant relative that runs one of these water purification plants and they say that they clean their system very frequently, but know others that do not.
Title: Re: Building our house in a sub-division
Post by: wildbill on January 24, 2013, 08:36:00 PM
Now that you mentioned it I also see sedment in my coffee pot and wondered why if it is being filtered threw 28 stages hmmmn  :o
Title: Re: Building our house in a sub-division
Post by: Art, just a re(tired) Fil-Am on January 24, 2013, 10:37:21 PM
We pay 15 Pesos for a 5 gallon refill of purified water.. Why drink tap water when treated water can be that cheap?
I remember in the 1980`s just how widespread and common Typhoid fever was in Manila back then when water purification businesses were not operating..
Tap water? Forget it!
P15 for a 5 gallon of purified water is unheard of where we live which is around P45!
I wonder about the qualify when paying less for purified water, because at times I've seen sediments in some of the bottled water we've bought before and switched over to another water dispensing delivery company because of it! Fortunately I haven't yet become ill with the purified water we buy in our area! 
Title: Re: Building our house in a sub-division
Post by: BudM on January 25, 2013, 12:12:01 AM
I am finding mineral deposits inside of my coffee maker.
Title: Re: Building our house in a sub-division
Post by: Art, just a re(tired) Fil-Am on January 25, 2013, 12:42:27 AM
I don't even have a coffee maker ever since we moved here! I'm not too picky about not having a coffee maker as long I can find a good brand of instant coffee like Folgers or similar to it in taste and aroma!
I first use a clear measuring cup to make sure there are no sediments in the water and micro wave it, then make my instant coffee to taste! I'm just a one big cup a day coffee drinker just in the morning!
Are we getting off the main topic?
Title: Re: Building our house in a sub-division
Post by: fred on January 25, 2013, 07:27:21 AM
Actually Fred I have doubts about what you are getting when you buy "purified" water. Our local supplier claims that their water passes through multiple stages of filtration, including reverse osmosis. However the mineral deposits inside my coffee machine make me wonder if the water is filtered at all. And we pay 30 pesos per 5 gallon bottle.

Richard

I was talking to a friend of mine,an Englishman that has one of these purification centers..
From memory what he says is that the water is put into a 500 gallon container and then all the nasties are killed with clorine.. The other 24 processes (amongst other things) help remove the taste of bleach.
We have to pick up the water ourselves for that price(25 Pesos delivered) and it takes them 20 minutes to sterilize our bottles..
Tap water where we live is almost brackish to salty just about everywhere on our island and I cant drink it full stop unless its been purified..
It is what it it is!
Title: Re: Building our house in a sub-division
Post by: hitekcountry on January 25, 2013, 09:50:50 AM
I’ll be in the Philippines in a few weeks, and I’m wondering what to expect on the availability of drinking water when traveling. Are the 16oz/500ml bottles available everywhere or will I need to buy larger volumes (1 or 5 gal) and then fill my walking around containers myself?
Title: Re: Building our house in a sub-division
Post by: Art, just a re(tired) Fil-Am on January 25, 2013, 10:41:57 AM
The availability of bottled water isn't a problem, just don't buy them from street vendors for obvious reasons!
Title: Re: Building our house in a sub-division
Post by: paulgee on January 25, 2013, 04:43:56 PM
We pay P25 for a 5 gallon container of drinking water. Whilst our house was being built we found out that the water pressure in our sub division was quite poor, especially at peak times, so we had a well drilled to 120 feet and pumped into a pressure tank to supply water to the house. Otherwise the hot water showers upstairs would probably not work due to the low pressure.

Whilst we don't use the well water for drinking it does seem pretty pure. It would have cost around P4000  to get it tested and we may do that during our next stay there.

Paul
Title: Re: Building our house in a sub-division
Post by: Metz on January 26, 2013, 06:25:26 AM
We have community deep well water here.  It is treated by dumping chlorine down the well every so often.  We did the same thing in Africa at the military base there for the wash water.  I am developing a machine that will chlorine treat water with a meter that measures the water coming into the tank and what got out.  It will calculate based on time and water flow how many drops of unscented chlorine bleach to add to the tank. 

I will make the pluming and parts on my 3d printer when it gets done.
Title: Re: Building our house in a sub-division
Post by: graham on January 26, 2013, 08:10:46 PM
Wildbill,

My septic is similar to yours. I'm right on the beach on sand.
I have no outlet pipe at all, and no bottom on the septic.
It was like this when I bought the house 5 years ago
And I haven't had a problem yet.

The reason that using paper is discouraged is because it will
clog up the drainage qualities of the sand, thus, we use the "tabo" system
in our house. There is no "pump-out" facility available for our septic,
and even if there was, we can't get a truck near our place.

Rest assured, use it wisely, and it will serve you for many years.
When I first moved in, I used a stick, as there was no lid/opening,
to see how the septic was.
It came back clean, so the sand must be doing it's job.

I'm aware that as the bottom of the septic is just sand, everything
must leach thru' to the ocean. Unfortunately, there is no other
way that I can divert it, and as there are hundreds of homes/huts on
my stretch of the beach doing the same thing, it would be a wasted
exercise. No pun intended.

Graham
Title: Re: Building our house in a sub-division
Post by: hoppin john on February 03, 2013, 07:42:19 PM
The  only problem with building a house  in a  subdivision and  i have  many friends  living  in them, and  they all bought  houses already, owned for  almost  half  of  the  cost, you can never recover  the  cost of  building, well you say i am going to live  here the  rest of  my life  , that  is  good  if  you can see that  far  ahead, most  can't, things  happen, sickness, death so on, i have  a  friend  a  retired  marine  captain who sold  his  house  ,i never  thought  he  would , and  is  going back to the USA for  medical reasons, the  Philippines  has  some  pretty good  medical facilities but  nothing  compared  to first  world  countries, he  has  a  condition they requires Medical treatment  not  offered  in the  Philippines, houses in subdivisions  are  for  sale  all the  time  owners  leave for  one  reason or another,and  you cannot  own property, ohhhhhh but  my wife  i trust  her  so much she  is  so kind and  loving , i have  been coming her  for  50 years  and  living  here permanent  don't  believe  it
Title: Re: Building our house in a sub-division
Post by: wildbill on February 03, 2013, 08:34:36 PM
thanks graham we will see how it works out but when we have visitors they are throwing tissue in the bowl  -next time we have visitors im gonna remove all tissue let  :othem wipe with there fingers I say...
Title: Re: Building our house in a sub-division
Post by: Art, just a re(tired) Fil-Am on February 03, 2013, 11:24:13 PM
When we have visitors, we make sure to inform them not to throw tissue in the toilet and wipe up their water spills in the sink or where ever! Simple as that! Your house, your rules! 
Title: Re: Building our house in a sub-division
Post by: graham on February 04, 2013, 10:33:16 AM
thanks graham we will see how it works out but when we have visitors they are throwing tissue in the bowl  -next time we have visitors im gonna remove all tissue let  :othem wipe with there fingers I say...

WB,

Get one of those little "Hygenic Hand-Held" sprayers, available at most H'ware stores.
I have one and it is brilliant. It has a trigger type valve and looks like a miniature shower head
placed on a long flexible tube. Put a "T" piece onto the water inlet for the toilet. Fit the hose
and you're good to go. Don't forget to have a container of hand-washing soap handy
so visitors (and yourself) can wash up after using the toilet.

Graham
Title: Re: Building our house in a sub-division
Post by: BingColin on February 04, 2013, 10:50:09 AM
If you ban people from putting tissue down the toilet and provide a bin as they do in a lot of public toilets, how do you deal with potential smelly and unhygienic contents. Just curious :)
Title: Re: Building our house in a sub-division
Post by: BingColin on February 04, 2013, 08:20:10 PM
I have a question about cleaning toilets connected to a septic tank. Bing is using the remnants of Joy in a small Joy bottle and adding 50% water and 50% vinegar. Although the joy is very diluted, it does sat ‘anti bacterial’. I am concerned that this could harm the natural bacteria that is necessary to make a septic tank work. Can anyone comment on this and perhaps suggest an alternative method/product to descale and generally keep the toilet bowl clean and hygienic?
Title: Re: Building our house in a sub-division
Post by: wildbill on February 04, 2013, 08:49:29 PM
how do you deal with potential smelly and unhygienic contents.- simple not many parties happen here anymore cause I hate nasty people with no respect for others and dont follow simple house rules of cleanlyness-number 1- I have hand push soap they wont use it,2 I have a trash can next to the toilet they dont use it they throw it in the toilet bowl,3 I have and air freshner it works but when they piss the floor it dont work well,and piss all over the bowl to,when they use the shower the little boy piss the floor yes its gross what to do get mad nope just lesson well lurned.no more parties...maybe sighns might work.... :-\ and thats not all they leave Behind to..yep I have a sprayer to.love it..I always think it really belongs to the kitchen sink..
Title: Re: Building our house in a sub-division
Post by: Gray Wolf on February 24, 2013, 05:19:59 AM
When we visited Vigan we stayed at Villa Angela, an old colonial style mansion, but with modern CR facilities.  They didn't provide paper and had no paper holder but what I really thought was nice was that each toilet was equipped with a small spray hose similar to the ones you might use in your kitchen sink.  It was mounted in the wall beside each toilet bowl and had it's own spigot.  It was very handy for cleaning up afterwards.   :)
Title: Re: Building our house in a sub-division
Post by: John Edwards on February 24, 2013, 11:36:56 PM
Colin, there is not enough “anti” in the soap formula to even make a slight dent in the bacteria in the septic tank. Truthfully, the soaps that are labeled Anti-Bacteria is just a play on words. All soaps are anti-bacterial soaps, some just put the words on the label because they are the current buzz words and that helps it sell. Most customers when faced with choices will choose the one that says it’s anti-bacterial, even if it is more expensive.

I have a question of my own. Why is there all the talk about not flushing toilet paper? That stuff is designed to be very biodegradable and it will disappear quickly in the septic tank. When you flush it, by the time it gets to the tank it is disintegrated into a pulp. There are millions of little bacteria bugs in the tank and they eat toilet paper just as fast as they eat the feces.  :o
You men can do a test. Toss some toilet paper in the commode and let it get thoroughly soaked, and then pee on it. It will totally come apart.
Also, not tossing it into a waste can means it don’t draw flies and stink up the room.

I like the idea of the small cleaning hose beside the commode, sort of like a flexible bidet. I’ll add that to my list of things I’ll want in my house when I get there.
Title: Re: Building our house in a sub-division
Post by: fred on February 24, 2013, 11:43:31 PM
With the amount of Bleach and acid we use our beneficial bacteria colonies never really had a chance.
The smallest amount of bleach will pretty much do the same thing.
Title: Re: Building our house in a sub-division - Toilets!!!
Post by: Art, just a re(tired) Fil-Am on February 24, 2013, 11:49:04 PM
Well, the Japanese seems to have all the right ideas about toilets! Anyway, I don't like wet bath room floors! The shower floor/wall being wet is understandable, but all 4 walls wet too, now that's ridiculous!

https://www.google.com/search?q=pictures+of+fancy+japanese+toilets&hl=en&tbm=isch&tbo=u&source=univ&sa=X&ei=fjUqUYPbIsmmrAegk4GoAQ&sqi=2&ved=0CC4QsAQ&biw=1344&bih=762
Title: Re: Building our house in a sub-division - Toilets!!!
Post by: Gray Wolf on February 25, 2013, 02:07:53 AM
Well, the Japanese seems to have all the right ideas about toilets! Anyway, I don't like wet bath room floors! The shower floor/wall being wet is understandable, but all 4 walls wet too, now that's ridiculous!

https://www.google.com/search?q=pictures+of+fancy+japanese+toilets&hl=en&tbm=isch&tbo=u&source=univ&sa=X&ei=fjUqUYPbIsmmrAegk4GoAQ&sqi=2&ved=0CC4QsAQ&biw=1344&bih=762 (https://www.google.com/search?q=pictures+of+fancy+japanese+toilets&hl=en&tbm=isch&tbo=u&source=univ&sa=X&ei=fjUqUYPbIsmmrAegk4GoAQ&sqi=2&ved=0CC4QsAQ&biw=1344&bih=762)

Your aim is off if you hose down the walls trying to "tabo".   :D :D :)
Title: Re: Building our house in a sub-division - Toilets!!!
Post by: paulgee on February 25, 2013, 05:13:01 AM
Well, the Japanese seems to have all the right ideas about toilets! Anyway, I don't like wet bath room floors! The shower floor/wall being wet is understandable, but all 4 walls wet too, now that's ridiculous!

https://www.google.com/search?q=pictures+of+fancy+japanese+toilets&hl=en&tbm=isch&tbo=u&source=univ&sa=X&ei=fjUqUYPbIsmmrAegk4GoAQ&sqi=2&ved=0CC4QsAQ&biw=1344&bih=762 (https://www.google.com/search?q=pictures+of+fancy+japanese+toilets&hl=en&tbm=isch&tbo=u&source=univ&sa=X&ei=fjUqUYPbIsmmrAegk4GoAQ&sqi=2&ved=0CC4QsAQ&biw=1344&bih=762)

Your aim is off if you hose down the walls trying to "tabo".   :D :D :)

Especially when you consider the typical size of our target area!!

Paul
Title: Re: Building our house in a sub-division - Toilets!!!
Post by: Art, just a re(tired) Fil-Am on February 25, 2013, 04:19:57 PM
Well, the Japanese seems to have all the right ideas about toilets! Anyway, I don't like wet bath room floors! The shower floor/wall being wet is understandable, but all 4 walls wet too, now that's ridiculous!

https://www.google.com/search?q=pictures+of+fancy+japanese+toilets&hl=en&tbm=isch&tbo=u&source=univ&sa=X&ei=fjUqUYPbIsmmrAegk4GoAQ&sqi=2&ved=0CC4QsAQ&biw=1344&bih=762 (https://www.google.com/search?q=pictures+of+fancy+japanese+toilets&hl=en&tbm=isch&tbo=u&source=univ&sa=X&ei=fjUqUYPbIsmmrAegk4GoAQ&sqi=2&ved=0CC4QsAQ&biw=1344&bih=762)
Your aim is off if you hose down the walls trying to "tabo".   :D :D :)
I haven't yet to use a tabo in our home to take a bath with! Been there and done that long long ago!
I take warm showers now and the rest of our bathroom floor stays dry when I step out of the shower!
Oh, this was about toilets! Yeah, even the floor around our toilet stays dry! You all know why! No tabo hanging on the wall, under the toilet tank or ever will again! We don't always do the "When in Rome" thing when we don't have to do it the Filipino way! :o ;)