Living In The Philippines Forum

It’s Your Money => Building in the Philippines => Topic started by: Splooge Magoo on August 08, 2014, 02:09:51 AM

Title: Building wish list
Post by: Splooge Magoo on August 08, 2014, 02:09:51 AM
I'm getting closer to buying the lot in Canyon Wood (Laurel) and a few months ago I got a great response with what I should bring over from the old country, I figure I will try it again. There are a few restrictions besides money. I am using another forum member's cost per sqm of P22k per sqm.

It has to have a rustic, country living look. The lot I am looking at is 300 sqm and the building footprint can't be more than 150 sqm. I have bad knees and a fat ass so I need a western style house. (I know, lose weight, helps knees). Once the house design is approved, you cannot expand the foot print. Water storage cannot be on the roof.

Having read this over and over insulation is a must.

I saw one house that had a cement log cabin look and I thought that was pretty cool. I would worry about the "logs" deteriorating over a period of time.

I'm not sure if solar panels are allowed as it would conflict with the look. I have a question in with the board regarding this matter. The outside look has to be approved by the HOA.

I would like two bedrooms on the first floor, living room, dining area and large kitchen (tiled floors). Upstairs would be a guest room, library (with balcony over the car port), helpers quarters with outside access). As in the States, the number of bath rooms increase the price of the build tremendously.

I read in the lot information that they recommend that a separate underground water tank  would be helpful as the water pressure drops at peak times so that would indicate to me that I would need an electric pump. Once I need an electric pump for plumbing, I need a generator (Honda!!!).

I think I'm turning into a hippie reading about all of the rain water catching systems, so I think I will join the club for gardening and emergency use.

In the bathrooms in my current house, I used silo stone instead of tile and grout. Its a great look as its one solid piece per wall and you can get the same design for the sink.

Ceiling fans / inverter type A/C for the bed rooms / Attic Fan (I guess this is based on the overall design).

Dual voltage for 110 and 220 items

I will save the toilet discussion for another topic.

Thanks again for all of the great advice.



Title: Re: Building wish list
Post by: Tally J on August 08, 2014, 07:15:48 AM
Two comments for you.

Insulation is a must as you say.  Last year when my wife and I retired and moved to Pampanga we shipped a container and I bought 6" bats of insulation for the ceiling.  There was an immediate decline in the inside house temperature after it was installed.  Well worth it for comfort.

Secondly, we purchased ceiling fans at Costco for less than $100 and had them installed.  This required 110v but I see that you are planning on that also.  Fan designs are limited and expensive here so get them in the US if you have some way to ship them.

Good luck on your move.
Title: Re: Building wish list
Post by: hitekcountry on August 08, 2014, 07:17:35 AM
One kitchen or two? It’s not  uncommon in the Philippines to have two kitchens, there is the regular kitchen you would find is a similar home in the US and then there is the second “dirty kitchen”.

AT first I didn’t see the logic in having two kitchens but the more you think about it the more it makes sense. I’ll mention a few points and then hopefully others can give ideas.

 One thing to think about is that there are some Filipino dishes that are god awful smelly that will stink up the whole house, :-[ you might want to cook those outside. Just imagine stinking up the whole house and then opening all the windows and wasting all the air conditioned air. :(

Also if you're going to butcher and clean a goat or pig you don't want to do that in the nice kitchen, do it in the dirty kitchen.

Speaking of air con, if the dirty kitchen is not in the air conditioned space all the heat generated in the kitchen doesn’t become a load on the air con.

Of the houses that I saw in the Philippines it was the higher end homes that had the two kitchens. That's just what I saw, I'd be interested in knowing what others opinions are on that.
Title: Re: Building wish list
Post by: Splooge Magoo on August 08, 2014, 07:30:15 AM
Hitek, I'm sold on the dirty kitchen
Title: Re: Building wish list
Post by: BingColin on August 08, 2014, 07:41:30 AM
Just a few initial thoughts.

When I designed my house, as well as high insulation, I concentrated also on high air flow. Having lived in it for several years I am finding the airflow less important and use more aircon than I originally expected. I would now concentrate on even more insulation, perhaps to include double, or secondary, glazing. Our bedroom is noticeable cooler even after being out for many hours during the day.

Unless you are bringing over expensive 110v only equipment, I would avoid the complication of a dual voltage electrical system. The 110v stuff will eventually die and be replaced, if bought locally, by 220v. Use transformers if necessary.

Not too sure about ceiling fans, they just blow the hot air that collects at the top of a room back down again. May be OK if you have lots of open windows but perhaps high level vents would be better.

I did think about attic extraction fans but decided they were an unnecessary complication, plenty of vents should work OK. Ridge vents would be good but complicate the roof structure.

One thing to consider if you are on a small lot, do you get decent airflow around the house? This was a problem with our original rented bungalow.
Title: Re: Building wish list
Post by: coleman2347 on August 08, 2014, 07:42:04 AM
One kitchen or two? It’s not  uncommon in the Philippines to have two kitchens, there is the regular kitchen you would find is a similar home in the US and then there is the second “dirty kitchen”.

AT first I didn’t see the logic in having two kitchens but the more you think about it the more it makes sense. I’ll mention a few points and then hopefully others can give ideas.

 One thing to think about is that there are some Filipino dishes that are god awful smelly that will stink up the whole house, :-[ you might want to cook those outside. Just imagine stinking up the whole house and then opening all the windows and wasting all the air conditioned air. :(

Also if you're going to butcher and clean a goat or pig you don't want to do that in the nice kitchen, do it in the dirty kitchen.

Speaking of air con, if the dirty kitchen is not in the air conditioned space all the heat generated in the kitchen doesn’t become a load on the air con.

Of the houses that I saw in the Philippines it was the higher end homes that had the two kitchens. That's just what I saw, I'd be interested in knowing what others opinions are on that.
Hitek, Dan, for all the reasons mentioned, plus a few more I totally agree...I use my dirty kitchen for a lot more than cooking, I put a tv there and when the kids are home from school I use it for my tv room, I can shut it off and not hear all the noise, I also use it for a party/beer room when my friends come over, same reason we can get out of the way...I finished it native style and have it semi open to the front yard and at night its the most peaceful place in the house complete with night breezes ....my favorite room now....
Title: Re: Building wish list
Post by: piozam13 on August 08, 2014, 09:37:31 AM
Veranda, balcony, gazebo, dirty kitchen ... call it whatever ... it's where you park your bbq grill, where mates come anytime  for cold beer without upsetting what's going on inside the house.  Muddy flip flops welcome .. maybe.
.
Title: Re: Building wish list
Post by: jjcabgou on August 08, 2014, 09:44:23 AM
Dan,
What made you decide on Canyon Woods?  We currently live in Tagaytay and are in the process of searching for a house, we have not yet decided on whether to purchase an already built house or buy.  There are only two advantages of buying an already built house that I can think of, 1. Much quicker to move in 2. 90 percent of them come furnished.
We also have not decided on a location yet which is why I am curious how you settled on Canyon Woods, its a little ways out from the stores, markets etc. but maybe that is what you prefer.
Regarding your costs, I spoke with a contractor yesterday, they really only deal with higher end designs and he quoted me 30,000 per square meter.  I did go into 3 of the houses he has built and they were all very very very nice.  I would suggest you do some serious shopping/research before you decide on a contractor.  If we do end up building I am hoping to get something more in the range of 25k per square meter.  22k you might be sacrificing quality (please note, most here on this forum have way more experience than I do, and my thought process may not be as accurate as I am thinking).  We brought a bunch of 120V kitchen appliances with us and exclusively use transformers with no problem at all.  And most of what we brought over I have now discovered we can get the same thing in Manila.  BTW, we used LBC to ship a lot of boxes, there is no weight limit and we received every box in good condition.
Title: Re: Building wish list
Post by: Art, just a re(tired) Fil-Am on August 08, 2014, 03:50:58 PM
We had a wish list too before I retired, but when I finally did retire and we moved to the Philippines, our savings account was minimal and my initial pension was just as minimal, but was just enough to live on for the next 11 years before my other pensions kicked in!
17 years later, we're still here in the Philippines and enjoying our retirement lifestyle and I have been collecting my other pensions when I turned age 60 and 62. I'm now 66 and our home is paid for! Life is grand even though we didn't have any plans to begin with when we first arrived here in the Philippines just by a "leap of faith" when I retired 6 years early at age 49, but things just turned out for the best over the years, even without all of the stuff from our wish list; Veranda, balcony, gazebo, dirty kitchen, swimming pool and a luxury vehicle like the rest of our "well to do" neighbors! Then again we aren't the type that try to keep up with the "Jones Family" in our "sort of upscale" subdivision, which is in no comparison to some of the homes in the Tagaytay area in the real up-scaled subdivisions up in the High Lands and or of their secluded valleys there in!
It's really all about "each to their own" and for those who were financially prepared prior to their retirement! 
Title: Re: Building wish list
Post by: Splooge Magoo on August 08, 2014, 03:58:32 PM
Jjcabgou, I loved the view, the forest settings, open spaces, etc. The 20 minute drive is a plus for me, club house is fantastic and the 9 hole golf course is a good way for me to get my game back. Plus I did not see bars over every window so it appears to be safe. I did read about an armed robbery a few years ago, but that could happen anywhere.

I have some family connections in construction,  so I think I'm Ok on trust. Your cost estimates worry me a bit. The sqm really is quite subjective, so who knows what our tastes are like.
Title: Re: Building wish list
Post by: Splooge Magoo on August 08, 2014, 04:01:09 PM
Art,  fortunately for me, I don't worry about the Jones.
Title: Re: Building wish list
Post by: Shewmake on August 08, 2014, 07:33:13 PM
We also have not decided on a location yet which is why I am curious how you settled on Canyon Woods, its a little ways out from the stores, markets etc. but maybe that is what you prefer.
Regarding your costs, I spoke with a contractor yesterday, they really only deal with higher end designs and he quoted me 30,000 per square meter.  I did go into 3 of the houses he has built and they were all very very very nice.  I would suggest you do some serious shopping/research before you decide on a contractor.  If we do end up building I am hoping to get something more in the range of 25k per square meter.  22k you might be sacrificing quality (please note, most here on this forum have way more experience than I do, and my thought process may not be as accurate as I am thinking). 

Canyon Woods is very, very nice, a bit pricey, but very nice. :)

As to the cost it really is all over the place. It depends on what you want and where you are. Dan, look in the home construction section and you will see posts from our construction project. The house is a bungalow and about 190 sqr mtrs. We built the house for about 22K per sqr mtrs (less appliances), and we did not sacrifice much on the quality, to us anyway. Of course, I was my own contractor/foreman; which, I believe saved us 25-40%, as that is what a most contractors want as a profit margin here. This didn't include the cost of the lot. If you're looking at a high end place of around 200-300 sqr mtrs, you will pay more. If you family has connections construction that will save you some, but if the home is large- even at 25K per, it will cost you 6.2 million for a 250 sqr mtr home.

Buying a house and lot can save you loads, if you have take exactly what the developer is offering to build. Every little change or upgrade will cost you lot. If you're buying a home already built, the same applies- if you don't like it, you will have to remodel. For us, we found we didn't care for most of the home designs we looked at in our price range, and to be honest the quality of the overall construction was not up to what we wanted. This does not mean they will fall down around your ears by any stretch, but my just take on it.

Let me add, being your own contractor here should not be taken lightly.

The best of luck to you both (Dan and jjcabgou).
Title: Re: Building wish list
Post by: Splooge Magoo on August 08, 2014, 08:23:56 PM
Stephen,

I read most of those post and I am using your costs as the basis. I currently live in a 120 sqm condo, so I think I can get by with 200 sqm for total floor space. The downstairs is really where the money will be spent as the upstairs would be for guests and help. The houses in all of the neighborhoods we looked at were all multi-story and I have to avoid stairs so I think I am best of building.

Colin - I will have open space around the house, so open windows will be the norm. When I remodel a few years ago, the ceiling fans and attic fan really do cool down the house. I'll leave it up to the architect to figure this out. I have some great gadgets, so I want the dual voltage. I'm sure over time, there will be some sort of universal standard for replacements, but I think its worth the extra expense to have options.

Tally J - I would have guessed that fan technology would be pretty great in the area.

I didn't ask about this initially, but I think I have to plan for wiring for future technology. I think everything is going wireless, but at this point I think wired connections is still the best.
Title: Re: Building wish list
Post by: ABCDeVil on August 08, 2014, 10:35:27 PM
Not too sure about ceiling fans, they just blow the hot air that collects at the top of a room back down again. May be OK if you have lots of open windows but perhaps high level vents would be better.

Not sure if many people are aware that you can buy ceiling fans with a reverse switch. These push the hot air down or suck up the cooler air and push the hotter air out, through the wall or ceiling vents. Just a thought guys. Oh and by the way, I have seen them here in the Phils. My friend bought some locally (Olongapo) and had them installed. Says that it was the best thing to keep the high set house cooler on the hotter days.
Title: Re: Building wish list
Post by: Gray Wolf on August 09, 2014, 12:41:25 AM

Not sure if many people are aware that you can buy ceiling fans with a reverse switch. These push the hot air down or suck up the cooler air and push the hotter air out, through the wall or ceiling vents. Just a thought guys. Oh and by the way, I have seen them here in the Phils. My friend bought some locally (Olongapo) and had them installed. Says that it was the best thing to keep the high set house cooler on the hotter days.

Bingo!  We have them in the living room and inside kitchen to keep air flowing.  It works!   
Title: Re: Building wish list
Post by: Gray Wolf on August 09, 2014, 12:49:28 AM
Our current dirty kitchen is outside the house down an exterior wall.  All cooking, frying, etc is done there.  Keeps heat, steam and grease away from the inside. We do our grilling on the rooftop where it's open and keeps the smoke from inside the house.   



 
Title: Re: Building wish list
Post by: hitekcountry on August 09, 2014, 09:35:37 AM
Zones that can be isolated for different reasons.

We visited one place that I thought was very well designed for the owner’s needs. The husband is retired, had been a contractor of high-end homes in the US and when they built their Philippine vacation house he was both the designer and contractor for that build. The wife is Filipina and the aunt of my cousin’s wife.

The owners live part time in the US and part time in the Philippines.

They have a young couple that work for them that live at the house. The wife is the cook and housekeeper and the husband is driver, gardener and maintenance man. The couple also have a little girl.

The Zones-

1   The center of the house I would call the common area it was an open-air area that you entered into when you walked in the front entrance that led to a large veranda with a view of the beach and the ocean and you had the feel, of this is where I want to hang-out. Being open-air, obviously not air conditioned.

2   Second zone—guest rooms on one side of the common area are two large bedrooms, setup very much like hotel rooms, obviously for guests. Each room is big enough for the bed a sitting area and a desk and of course each has its own bath room.  That zone has its own aircon and would not need to be turned on if no one is there.

3   Third zone --- on the other side of the common area was the owners area which included the Master Suite, large bathroom, walk-in closet, the main kitchen and dining room and formal living room. This area could be locked up and aircon shut off when the owners are not there.

4   Fourth zone  consisted of the dirty kitchen (just outside the main kitchen) the workers (the young couples) bedroom and their bathroom. That area had its own entrance from the outside.

So when the owners aren’t there the help (young couple) have their own area and access to the common core area and have no need to be in zone two or three.

If the owners let family or friends visit when they are not there the guests have access to the guest rooms and the common area and no need to enter the owners locked zone.

And everyone of course have access to the beach.

The house is probably around 300sm and the lot is about 2800 sm.  On the beach.

I’ll just say it was quite nice.-- Understatment.-- I have lots of pictures but I’ll only share one small peek that doesn’t give away too much.

In the picture I’m standing in the open-air veranda looking towards the front entrance. The man in the picture was our driver and the little girl is the daughter of the young couple that live there. She is watching her favorite kids cartoon show. How many kids in the Philippines are so fortunate to live in such a place?

Title: Re: Building wish list
Post by: Shewmake on August 09, 2014, 12:04:04 PM
Nice  :D.
Title: Re: Building wish list
Post by: Art, just a re(tired) Fil-Am on August 09, 2014, 12:32:28 PM
Yes! It's nice and pricey! I no longer work for a living & my wish list has faded away,
but we do live a life of leisure, just without the mansion and or expensive adult toys! :o ;)
Title: Re: Building wish list
Post by: Lei on August 09, 2014, 03:57:10 PM

I think I'm turning into a hippie reading about all of the rain water catching systems, so I think I will join the club for gardening and emergency

A hippie? I have to stop what I am doing and smell myself... Patchouli? Lol. No offense meant. I practiced rain water harvesting, having a few large wine barrel around the house to harvest rain. I used it for cleaning, washing clothes, watering the plants and my brother even haul it to flush their toilet. This aside from having contour raised bed garden in my backyard to capture the rainwater so that it held up the water and percolates to the bottom of the bed. Adding mulch to the bed and thus reduced the need for watering the plants frequently. If I add...creating dams, swales to harness rain water on a larger scale as a way to recharge the aquifer and rehydrate an area, I am sure that is information overload. Does that make me a hippie? I guess so....a hippie sort of a granola eating, flexitarian, healthy lifestyle, love for the environment and respectful for the future. I prefer to be called however, a Permaculturist. We are living in an age of energy and freshwater decline and the future does not look pleasant UNLESS we move creatively into the future, changing our attitudes and lifestyles. Everyone should consider going green and doing their part to take care of the planet, whether a hippie, a hipster or one's own category of COOL.
Title: Re: Building wish list
Post by: Leinster Lad on August 09, 2014, 05:30:26 PM
Well said Julie, very well said  :D
Title: Re: Building wish list
Post by: Lee2 on August 09, 2014, 07:32:04 PM
Very very nice Hitek.
Title: Re: Building wish list
Post by: Splooge Magoo on August 10, 2014, 12:13:01 AM
Julie,

I agree with you and Dan.2 will be a better citizen of the earth. Not quite a hippie, but much less wasteful. Peace!
Title: Re: Building wish list
Post by: Lei on August 10, 2014, 07:51:05 AM
Julie,

I agree with you and Dan.2 will be a better citizen of the earth. Not quite a hippie, but much less wasteful. Peace!

Peace.  :) :) :)
Title: Re: Building wish list
Post by: Morocho on August 10, 2014, 10:06:11 PM
...insulation is a must. [Quoted only in part]

I could not find the posts recommending insulation, but I believe that Tagaytay is one of only a couple places in the Philippines where air conditioning is rarely, if ever, needed.

From Wikipedia:
Daily mean temperature in °F
Jan 73
Feb 73.9
Mar 75.6
Apr 77.5
May 77.5
Jun 76.3
Jul 74.7
Aug 74.7
Sep 74.8
Oct 75.4
Nov 74.5
Dec 73.6
Average for the year 75.13

My wife and I was just spend two days in Tagaytay and it was almost too cold for us! It is true that in April and May the temperatures may reach 86 degrees, but even that isn't so bad.



Title: Re: Building wish list
Post by: JD on August 11, 2014, 05:00:53 AM
I like that open space, hitek.

We're looking at averages of around 32C/90F every day down in Davao so although I would love to incorporate that open space into our future house, I'm going to have to really think how to have it without me melting.


JD
Title: Re: Building wish list
Post by: BingColin on August 11, 2014, 06:55:03 AM
...insulation is a must. [Quoted only in part]


I could not find the posts recommending insulation, but I believe that Tagaytay is one of only a couple places in the Philippines where air conditioning is rarely, if ever, needed.

From Wikipedia:
Daily mean temperature in °F
Jan 73
Feb 73.9
Mar 75.6
Apr 77.5
May 77.5
Jun 76.3
Jul 74.7
Aug 74.7
Sep 74.8
Oct 75.4
Nov 74.5
Dec 73.6
Average for the year 75.13

My wife and I was just spend two days in Tagaytay and it was almost too cold for us! It is true that in April and May the temperatures may reach 86 degrees, but even that isn't so bad.


Here is an excerpt for my website:-

Roof and Wall Insulation

I have found a table of R Values for different construction materials here:-
http://www.coloradoenergy.org/procorner/stuff/r-values.htm (http://www.coloradoenergy.org/procorner/stuff/r-values.htm)
Using these figures, I have calculated very approximately that the R value for a typical Philippine roof, metal plus ¾ inch foil faced foam with a plywood ceiling, would be R=6.0. A 4 inch hollow block wall faced each side with 1inch of cement would give about R=1.0

Recommended figures for Fort Lauderdale Florida, which has a similar climate to the Philippines, are Attic R=30-49 and walls R13-15. To bring the Philippine construction up to the minimum of these figures, I estimate you would need 6 inches of fibreglass above the ceiling, and 3 inches of Styrofoam on the Walls. These are only very rough figures, but it does give the general idea of what is required.

Using the foam sandwich wall would give a value of around R=11.0, which would be acceptable, and providing there was good airflow under the metal roof then perhaps 2 inches of foil covered fibreglass on the ceiling would also be worth considering if the 6 inches proves to be very expensive.

A comfortable inside temperature is around 21°C in the UK with an outside temperature averaging around 10°C about an 11°C difference. In the Philippines you can be comfortable at around 25°C by wearing less clothing with an outside temperature at about 30°C most of the time, giving a difference of around 5°C but in the opposite direction. In a cold country you can always add more clothing to compensate for a decrease in outside temperature, but in a hot country you have to add more insulation on the house to prevent the extra heat from getting in.

New houses are not allowed to be built in the UK without a lot of insulation, and the same should apply here if you want the same degree of comfort. An interesting comment by a Filipino was 'why do you need to insulate the house, it is not cold outside' :)


A bigger difference in comfort can be made by reducing the relative humidity, and an aircon will do that. We only set our aircons to 26C but it does reduce the humidity and is very comfortable without being too expensive.
Title: Re: Building wish list
Post by: jjcabgou on August 11, 2014, 07:20:01 AM
We live in Tagaytay and our bedroom is on the second floor, I use my AC every night except for the months of Jan, Feb, and March (started using in March), others may be able to do without but it does get warm, especially on the second floor.
When we finally do move, I will be certain the master bedroom is on the first floor.
Title: Re: Building wish list
Post by: Art, just a re(tired) Fil-Am on August 11, 2014, 08:23:04 AM
We may have our upstairs bedroom air conditioning running 24/7, 365 days, but we love it here where we live and have been for the past 15 years now!
Putting in insulation in the spare bedroom facing the hot sun will be my next project, because it doesn't get much use in the afternoon due to the warm sun, no problem at night though! Our downstairs is cool 24/7 most of the time and we have a 2 HP split type A/C if needed, seldom used though.
Will we ever move again? I doubt it, because nowadays it just takes too much time and money and we don't need the aggravation in building another home elsewhere, even though Tagaytay is tempting due to it's cooler climate and it's only minutes away from where we live now! Nah, still too much work and this old body of mine isn't what it used to be!
It's just nice to be laid back with a cold drink in hand with some finger food and just watch the fluffy white clouds passing by up in the clear blue sky, in our neck of the woods anyway! ??? :o
Title: Re: Building wish list
Post by: JD on August 11, 2014, 08:26:44 AM
Comments wanted on this line of thinking please: Can You Insulate Yourself Cool in the Philippines — Why R Value is Useless (http://philfaqs.com/can-you-insulate-yourself-cool-in-the-philippines-why-r-value-is-useless/).

I feel like Forrest Gump today, "I am not a smart man." This is one of those topics where both sides make sense to me, leaving me scratching my head.


JD
Title: Re: Building wish list
Post by: coleman2347 on August 11, 2014, 08:57:54 AM
Art, and anybody else that knows....Where here can you get insulation similar to what you can get in the states?  I have never seen anything here except the thin (1/4 to 3/8) foam with the silver backing...would love to insulate the new place in the province.  In the house I had in the states I framed it with 2x6 just so I could add more insulation. Here I'm at a loss..Lee
Title: Re: Building wish list
Post by: Morocho on August 11, 2014, 09:29:14 AM
Hi Coleman2347,

These people offer a wide variety of insulating materials, including cellulose fiber and fiberglass:

http://ifi.com.ph/ (http://ifi.com.ph/)

You could also look for insulation on Ayosdito.ph or olx.ph (formerly Sulit). I just looked and found these:

http://www.ayosdito.ph/Glass+wool+Insulation-7708265-1.htm (http://www.ayosdito.ph/Glass+wool+Insulation-7708265-1.htm)

http://www.olx.ph/index.php/view+classifieds/id/47606653/Glasswool+for+Roofing+Insulation?referralKeywords=glasswool+insulation&event=Search+Ranking,Position,1-4,4 (http://www.olx.ph/index.php/view+classifieds/id/47606653/Glasswool+for+Roofing+Insulation?referralKeywords=glasswool+insulation&event=Search+Ranking,Position,1-4,4)


Morocho


Title: Re: Building wish list
Post by: coleman2347 on August 11, 2014, 09:32:49 AM
Morocho, thanks, Ill check it out...btw..love your signature
 line
Title: Re: Building wish list
Post by: Art, just a re(tired) Fil-Am on August 11, 2014, 09:44:16 AM
Art, and anybody else that knows....Where here can you get insulation similar to what you can get in the states?  I have never seen anything here except the thin (1/4 to 3/8) foam with the silver backing...would love to insulate the new place in the province.  In the house I had in the states I framed it with 2x6 just so I could add more insulation. Here I'm at a loss..Lee
Yeah Lee,
Haven't really looked into it yet, but I do know what you're talking about the 1/4" to 3/8" foam sheets with the silver backing! Just have to do some research what to use here in the Philippines and where to buy it! Our spare room's interior walls and ceiling are made from gypsum boards, so it won't be a problem to tear down and put in insulation. We'll see when I get around to it or when the guy I hire doing the work will get to it! ::) ??? :o

P.S. Morocho,

I bookmarked your links of the different insulation for future use!
Thanks for the research!
Title: Re: Building wish list
Post by: BingColin on August 11, 2014, 09:50:42 AM
Art, and anybody else that knows....Where here can you get insulation similar to what you can get in the states?  I have never seen anything here except the thin (1/4 to 3/8) foam with the silver backing...would love to insulate the new place in the province.  In the house I had in the states I framed it with 2x6 just so I could add more insulation. Here I'm at a loss..Lee


We bought all our insulation from Citi Hardware, there should be a branch somewhere not too far from you. http://www.citihardware.com/branches.php (http://www.citihardware.com/branches.php)
Title: Re: Building wish list
Post by: Morocho on August 11, 2014, 10:16:51 AM
We live in Tagaytay and our bedroom is on the second floor, I use my AC every night except for the months of Jan, Feb, and March (started using in March), others may be able to do without but it does get warm, especially on the second floor.
When we finally do move, I will be certain the master bedroom is on the first floor.

jjcabgou has a great idea: put the master bedroom on the ground floor! I would put the guest bedroom(s), storage and a gym or rec room, if I had one, on the second floor. In addition to being cooler on the ground floor, mobility may become an issue as the years pass, so having the master bedroom and bath on the ground floor with the living room, dining room and kitchen makes perfect sense.
Title: Re: Building wish list
Post by: trev. on August 11, 2014, 10:55:49 AM
Hi, Have not post here for awhile, long story. First i hope it work well for you Mr. Splooge. Would like to add my little piece after reading all the post and good comments. We built our second home and moved in about six months ago. Fairly large house of about 350 sqm. including front and rear lanai. For insulation we used the the sheets with the silver backing installed just over the roof struts. Plywood ceiling. Have good roof ventilation as the eave sections has the small holes. On the side of the house facing the sunrise not a problem. But the side facing the afternoon  sun the wall gets fairly hot during that time of day. Wish i had used some wall insulation on that side. Concrete block construction. We have the PVC frame for our windows with heat deflecting tinted glass on the side exposed to the afternoon sun. That is a big help to cut down on the heat. For the three bedrooms including the master bedroom we have the split type air conn. units which works very well. For hot water we have a central hot water heater.  All the bathrooms have a separate section with doors where the toilet bowls are located and also ceiling fans. Ceiling fans also in each shower ceiling. All the filipino style CR. i have seen here the bowls are out in the open with not much privacy. We have the American style kitchen inside the house and also a dirty kitchen  set up at one corner of the back lanai where most of the cooking is done for now. Where we live is in the province up North Luzon. We have a 3100. sqm. lot. With one house on one side. Always a good breeze passing through. We installed screen doors with the ventilated mesh and insect screen. For additional ventilation we use electric fans. A few years ago when we were looking for lots we went to a sub division in Quezon City, Manila. This was supposed to be a upscaled area with a list of rules posted for home owners dos and donts. One of the rules was "No dog cages on the side walks" Well driving around the the area i counted about six dog cages outside the gates on the side walk.  It can be a up scale area but will it be that way for long? Drive around the area and observe.
Title: Re: Building wish list
Post by: BingColin on August 11, 2014, 11:19:01 AM
We live in Tagaytay and our bedroom is on the second floor, I use my AC every night except for the months of Jan, Feb, and March (started using in March), others may be able to do without but it does get warm, especially on the second floor.
When we finally do move, I will be certain the master bedroom is on the first floor.

jjcabgou has a great idea: put the master bedroom on the ground floor! I would put the guest bedroom(s), storage and a gym or rec room, if I had one, on the second floor. In addition to being cooler on the ground floor, mobility may become an issue as the years pass, so having the master bedroom and bath on the ground floor with the living room, dining room and kitchen makes perfect sense.

It does depend very much on location, but air does move faster above the ground away from the friction. If I were to build another house, which I won't, the main living area could be up on pylons with the master bedroom above that. I would use the ground floor space for a dirty kitchen, maids quarters and car parking.

Also, take a look at some of the very old traditional Philippine bungalows that have a single open bedroom above them, or sometimes a single row of bedrooms with an outside balcony.

My thinking has changed over the years and parhaps an alterative would be a compact bungalow, Australian outback ranch style, with very high insulation and double glazed windows.

Ever thought of feeding the hot air from the house through pipes buries well under the house to cool it. You could use computer fans powered by a solar panel to move the air.

Lots of ideas ;D ;)
Title: Re: Building wish list
Post by: Morocho on August 11, 2014, 01:21:03 PM
It does depend very much on location, but air does move faster above the ground away from the friction. If I were to build another house, which I won't, the main living area could be up on pylons with the master bedroom above that. I would use the ground floor space for a dirty kitchen, maids quarters and car parking.

Also, take a look at some of the very old traditional Philippine bungalows that have a single open bedroom above them, or sometimes a single row of bedrooms with an outside balcony.

My thinking has changed over the years and parhaps an alterative would be a compact bungalow, Australian outback ranch style, with very high insulation and double glazed windows.

Ever thought of feeding the hot air from the house through pipes buries well under the house to cool it. You could use computer fans powered by a solar panel to move the air.

Lots of ideas ;D ;)

I agree that air moves faster above ground level, away from obstacles like trees, fences and nearby buildings. To achieve this, I built a three story house where we would only occupy the second and third floors. We considered using the ground floor as a garage, but in the end built a nice two bedroom apartment. Even in the apartment, there is a good breeze as we are on a steep hillside with no trees or other houses near us.
 
Our contractor did use Styrofoam in some of the walls and eight-inch thick insulation in the ceiling of the third floor. We installed 84” ceiling fans and a “whole house fan” that blows air into the attic, which has gables to get rid of the hot air. All the fans use inverter-driven direct current motors, so they consume less than 30 Watts at full speed. We use awning windows where the view is not so important and sliding windows and doors for the views across the bay. Awning windows can be left open even when it rains, while three panel sliding windows and doors allow through 33% more air than two panel units.

We don’t use any air conditioning on the second floor. However, we find it too humid to sleep in our third floor bedroom, so we do use air conditioning there every night.