Living In The Philippines Forum

Itís Your Money => Building in the Philippines => Topic started by: HappyBee on June 24, 2017, 03:22:58 PM

Title: Security at Home
Post by: HappyBee on June 24, 2017, 03:22:58 PM
Just wondering what you feel is needed security wise for our homes? Applies to people living in metro areas as well as in the provinces.

Please don't share personal security information if it could put you at risk in any way.
Title: Re: Security at Home
Post by: jjcabgou on June 24, 2017, 06:21:38 PM
that is a broad question, and it boils down to many factors.   Location, are you near a lot of drugs and crime?  are you looking at living in a gated community?  Is the security solid in the gated community, some have very strong security, and some the guards get paid to wave anybody in.   There are so many factors.
I live in a gated community and we do not take any extra security precautions at all.   There are many in the neighborhood that leave their doors unlocked when going to the store or to eat. 
Additionally much of it may depend on how you carry yourself.   Flash money and expensive jewelry around all the time and that may make you a target regardless of where you are.... or act like a total asshole to the locals, and you may be wishing you had more security...   
Title: Re: Security at Home
Post by: lost_in_samoa on June 24, 2017, 07:21:51 PM
1.) Stop thinking like a victim.  Develop the mind set that you are going to fight if forced to.  Sooner or later some a__hole will oblige you.  Visualize and think about an attack against your person. That way if it ever does happen you won't freeze up with panic.

2.) Dress like the neighborhood.  Its the little things that catch attention.  Earrings that you think are modest may give off the "bling - bling" air.  My wife is proud of the fact that her cell phone is a Blackberry from a decade ago.  Pickpockets have offered to give her a phone.

I work a lot so my clothes are always full of holes and stained.  People come to beg from me and I can honestly show them that the only thing I have in my pocket is a hole.  Eat like the neighborhood.  That way you smell like everyone else.  Once again it is the small things.

3.) Develop situational awareness.  Search the Internet.  There are plenty of sites that have small games/tests to help you develop this facility.  Plan so that you are never alone.  Have competent people around.  When I say competent, I mean paying attention to the world and not distracted by the results of last night's game show.

4.) Arm yourself and your family.  Train until you develop muscle memory.  I am not necessarily speaking of fire-arms.  Though they are the ultimate equalizer.  In example,  both my Wife and Daughter carry sprays.  Which are readily available here.  They have practiced with the cannisters enough to be able to use them under stress. 

Take up a martial science.  I box.  The wife does Yoga/Taekwondo.  My daughter teaches Muy-Thai.

5.)  Start working on fortifying your house.  Window grills.  Stronger doors.  Security screen doors.  Simple security systems can be had for cheap these days.  But stay away from the fancy kits.  Simple is robust.  Robust is secure.

Animals can be useful.  Only if properly trained.  Outside dogs can be poisoned.  A well trained inside dog is better than any electronic system on the market.

Store up a bit of supplies.  You live in the 11th most disaster prone nation on the Earth.  Only common sense to have a few extra kilo's of rice/ligo and some bottled water.

6.)  Pro-actively avoid trouble.  Here is an example. I have a few relatives that drink. When I retired, I went to the elders in the family first.  Talked to them and made it clear that I wanted no trouble from anyone. 

A few days later my brother in law showed up drunk.  I firmly showed him to the door.  He went back to his home and started talking trash about us.  Until his Lolo told him to shut up and sit down.  Now they only come around when they are sober and everyone benefits.


Hope this helps.
Title: Re: Security at Home
Post by: M.C.A. on June 24, 2017, 09:30:45 PM
Nothing like a dog that's tied up as an early warning system... their hearing is second to none and you will be alerted.  I'd have barred windows and steel doors, concrete roof, main gates and gates to your entrances but don't totally block out the view from your neighbors, you'll want witnesses and if your walls or gates are a complete block out nobody will see or hear you in a bad happening.
Title: Re: Security at Home
Post by: David690 on June 24, 2017, 11:53:06 PM
1.) Stop thinking like a victim.  Develop the mind set that you are going to fight if forced to.  Sooner or later some a__hole will oblige you.  Visualize and think about an attack against your person. That way if it ever does happen you won't freeze up with panic.

2.) Dress like the neighborhood.  Its the little things that catch attention.  Earrings that you think are modest may give off the "bling - bling" air.  My wife is proud of the fact that her cell phone is a Blackberry from a decade ago.  Pickpockets have offered to give her a phone.

I work a lot so my clothes are always full of holes and stained.  People come to beg from me and I can honestly show them that the only thing I have in my pocket is a hole.  Eat like the neighborhood.  That way you smell like everyone else.  Once again it is the small things.

3.) Develop situational awareness.  Search the Internet.  There are plenty of sites that have small games/tests to help you develop this facility.  Plan so that you are never alone.  Have competent people around.  When I say competent, I mean paying attention to the world and not distracted by the results of last night's game show.

4.) Arm yourself and your family.  Train until you develop muscle memory.  I am not necessarily speaking of fire-arms.  Though they are the ultimate equalizer.  In example,  both my Wife and Daughter carry sprays.  Which are readily available here.  They have practiced with the cannisters enough to be able to use them under stress. 

Take up a martial science.  I box.  The wife does Yoga/Taekwondo.  My daughter teaches Muy-Thai.

5.)  Start working on fortifying your house.  Window grills.  Stronger doors.  Security screen doors.  Simple security systems can be had for cheap these days.  But stay away from the fancy kits.  Simple is robust.  Robust is secure.

Animals can be useful.  Only if properly trained.  Outside dogs can be poisoned.  A well trained inside dog is better than any electronic system on the market.

Store up a bit of supplies.  You live in the 11th most disaster prone nation on the Earth.  Only common sense to have a few extra kilo's of rice/ligo and some bottled water.

6.)  Pro-actively avoid trouble.  Here is an example. I have a few relatives that drink. When I retired, I went to the elders in the family first.  Talked to them and made it clear that I wanted no trouble from anyone. 

A few days later my brother in law showed up drunk.  I firmly showed him to the door.  He went back to his home and started talking trash about us.  Until his Lolo told him to shut up and sit down.  Now they only come around when they are sober and everyone benefits.


Hope this helps.

Well if that lot doesn't put anybody off living here I don't know what will...!!  Take up a martial art, are you kidding?  Where do you live?
Title: Re: Security at Home
Post by: lost_in_samoa on June 25, 2017, 04:38:41 AM
Well if that lot doesn't put anybody off living here I don't know what will...!!  Take up a martial art, are you kidding?  Where do you live?


That's pretty much boilerplate advice. 

Be aware of, and prepare for, the darker side of reality.  Which is the same the world over. 

I wonder how many people in Marawi  (http://news.abs-cbn.com/news/06/19/17/as-marawi-battle-continues-some-who-fled-die-in-refugee-centers) are wishing they had  seen this coming, were in better health, or had a bit of rice and fish?

Title: Re: Security at Home
Post by: jjcabgou on June 25, 2017, 11:00:40 AM
1.) Stop thinking like a victim.  Develop the mind set that you are going to fight if forced to.  Sooner or later some a__hole will oblige you.  Visualize and think about an attack against your person. That way if it ever does happen you won't freeze up with panic.

2.) Dress like the neighborhood.  Its the little things that catch attention.  Earrings that you think are modest may give off the "bling - bling" air.  My wife is proud of the fact that her cell phone is a Blackberry from a decade ago.  Pickpockets have offered to give her a phone.

I work a lot so my clothes are always full of holes and stained.  People come to beg from me and I can honestly show them that the only thing I have in my pocket is a hole.  Eat like the neighborhood.  That way you smell like everyone else.  Once again it is the small things.

3.) Develop situational awareness.  Search the Internet.  There are plenty of sites that have small games/tests to help you develop this facility.  Plan so that you are never alone.  Have competent people around.  When I say competent, I mean paying attention to the world and not distracted by the results of last night's game show.

4.) Arm yourself and your family.  Train until you develop muscle memory.  I am not necessarily speaking of fire-arms.  Though they are the ultimate equalizer.  In example,  both my Wife and Daughter carry sprays.  Which are readily available here.  They have practiced with the cannisters enough to be able to use them under stress. 

Take up a martial science.  I box.  The wife does Yoga/Taekwondo.  My daughter teaches Muy-Thai.

5.)  Start working on fortifying your house.  Window grills.  Stronger doors.  Security screen doors.  Simple security systems can be had for cheap these days.  But stay away from the fancy kits.  Simple is robust.  Robust is secure.

Animals can be useful.  Only if properly trained.  Outside dogs can be poisoned.  A well trained inside dog is better than any electronic system on the market.

Store up a bit of supplies.  You live in the 11th most disaster prone nation on the Earth.  Only common sense to have a few extra kilo's of rice/ligo and some bottled water.

6.)  Pro-actively avoid trouble.  Here is an example. I have a few relatives that drink. When I retired, I went to the elders in the family first.  Talked to them and made it clear that I wanted no trouble from anyone. 

A few days later my brother in law showed up drunk.  I firmly showed him to the door.  He went back to his home and started talking trash about us.  Until his Lolo told him to shut up and sit down.  Now they only come around when they are sober and everyone benefits.


Hope this helps.
Holy crap.   Dont forget your flak vest and kevlar.   Not sure anybody would want to live here after reading that.   Do you live in Marawi? 
Title: Re: Security at Home
Post by: balutsky on June 25, 2017, 11:42:43 AM
Just wondering what you feel is needed security wise for our homes? Applies to people living in metro areas as well as in the provinces.

Please don't share personal security information if it could put you at risk in any way.

CCTV, CCTV and more CCTV.  If you have a maid, install CCTV inside your home and always lock the doors where you store your valuables.  Do not trust your maid.  A lot of maids are in connivance with thieves and undesirables.  Otherwise not to be paranoid too much on security.  if you get along with the locals they will look after you.  Don't be an ass and you will be fine.  "You reap what you sow"
Title: Re: Security at Home
Post by: suzukig1 on June 25, 2017, 11:50:33 AM
We have many dogs.  It's common to hear stories about houses getting robbed in the PHL but it's almost always houses that don't have dogs.

Also, we usually have someone at home.  When everyone is gone on vacation we get someone to house sit.  The only time no one is at the house is when we all go out to dinner.  But the dogs are always there.

No other special security precautions.  We don't even have bars on the windows.  We live in a middle class to upper middle class PHL neighborhood.  Everyone owns there home and half the people have relatively new cars.

I have been living in the PHL full time since 2007.  No incidents so far.
Title: Re: Security at Home
Post by: lost_in_samoa on June 25, 2017, 12:30:36 PM
Holy crap.   Dont forget your flak vest and kevlar.   Not sure anybody would want to live here after reading that.   Do you live in Marawi?

I didn't forget.  Just don't recommend that to beginners.

 ;)


No I don't live down south.  But I could.

Title: Re: Security at Home
Post by: JD on June 25, 2017, 02:01:46 PM
I have a sniper on my roof and spike-filled trenches along my walls.

Oh, and the patio is mined.
Title: Re: Security at Home
Post by: HappyBee on June 25, 2017, 02:51:09 PM
1.) Stop thinking like a victim.  Develop the mind set that you are going to fight if forced to.  Sooner or later some a__hole will oblige you.  Visualize and think about an attack against your person. That way if it ever does happen you won't freeze up with panic.

2.) Dress like the neighborhood.  Its the little things that catch attention.  Earrings that you think are modest may give off the "bling - bling" air.  My wife is proud of the fact that her cell phone is a Blackberry from a decade ago.  Pickpockets have offered to give her a phone.

I work a lot so my clothes are always full of holes and stained.  People come to beg from me and I can honestly show them that the only thing I have in my pocket is a hole.  Eat like the neighborhood.  That way you smell like everyone else.  Once again it is the small things.

3.) Develop situational awareness.  Search the Internet.  There are plenty of sites that have small games/tests to help you develop this facility.  Plan so that you are never alone.  Have competent people around.  When I say competent, I mean paying attention to the world and not distracted by the results of last night's game show.

4.) Arm yourself and your family.  Train until you develop muscle memory.  I am not necessarily speaking of fire-arms.  Though they are the ultimate equalizer.  In example,  both my Wife and Daughter carry sprays.  Which are readily available here.  They have practiced with the cannisters enough to be able to use them under stress. 

Take up a martial science.  I box.  The wife does Yoga/Taekwondo.  My daughter teaches Muy-Thai.

5.)  Start working on fortifying your house.  Window grills.  Stronger doors.  Security screen doors.  Simple security systems can be had for cheap these days.  But stay away from the fancy kits.  Simple is robust.  Robust is secure.

Animals can be useful.  Only if properly trained.  Outside dogs can be poisoned.  A well trained inside dog is better than any electronic system on the market.

Store up a bit of supplies.  You live in the 11th most disaster prone nation on the Earth.  Only common sense to have a few extra kilo's of rice/ligo and some bottled water.

6.)  Pro-actively avoid trouble.  Here is an example. I have a few relatives that drink. When I retired, I went to the elders in the family first.  Talked to them and made it clear that I wanted no trouble from anyone. 

A few days later my brother in law showed up drunk.  I firmly showed him to the door.  He went back to his home and started talking trash about us.  Until his Lolo told him to shut up and sit down.  Now they only come around when they are sober and everyone benefits.


Hope this helps.

Honestly I think there are some good points in here.

I probably won't take up a martial art, but being in shape couldn't hurt. Storing supplies and not rubbing people up the wrong way are good ideas too.
Title: Re: Security at Home
Post by: HappyBee on June 25, 2017, 02:55:34 PM
Nothing like a dog that's tied up as an early warning system... their hearing is second to none and you will be alerted.  I'd have barred windows and steel doors, concrete roof, main gates and gates to your entrances but don't totally block out the view from your neighbors, you'll want witnesses and if your walls or gates are a complete block out nobody will see or hear you in a bad happening.

I'm interested in the concrete roof idea. The problem is qualified masons are hard to get, and I would want it to hold up in an earthquake  :-\
Title: Re: Security at Home
Post by: lost_in_samoa on June 25, 2017, 03:24:12 PM
I'm interested in the concrete roof idea.

I am sad to say that I can't help much with roofs.  I live in a dome.

What I will say is that the title Mason here is ....... uhmmmm .... loosely applied. 

So Caveat Emptor.

A lot of the users here have built.  Go through the construction posts.   Makes for hilarious reading.
Title: Re: Security at Home
Post by: M.C.A. on June 25, 2017, 03:45:00 PM
I'm interested in the concrete roof idea. The problem is qualified masons are hard to get, and I would want it to hold up in an earthquake  :-\


Happybee it's gonna be a wake up call our first super typhoon and it's at that point a concrete roof makes sense, you won't have trouble finding anyone who can build a roof let alone a 2nd floor concrete flooring, they are pretty much the same, you'll want to be involved in the process, and you wouldn't believe how dangerous looking concrete houses and condo's look like before they put the finishing touches, buying a home already built is earthquake scary.  I wouldn't want any maid in our house, lessons learned and I can do my own dishes, I'd put those bars on the windows, actually, you can have your windows made rather cheaply with bars, we had several HUGE windows made for our home.  Here's a link to what the concrete roof should look like. http://tinyurl.com/ybxrveko (http://tinyurl.com/ybxrveko)
Title: Re: Security at Home
Post by: jjcabgou on June 25, 2017, 04:00:59 PM
Honestly I think there are some good points in here.

I probably won't take up a martial art, but being in shape couldn't hurt. Storing supplies and not rubbing people up the wrong way are good ideas too.
storing supplies for security purposes?  I guess if you are expecting an apocalypse?    All joking aside much of it depends on where you live and how you carry yourself.   Based on how some people live here, I am surprised they would want to live here.  Personally I would not want to live in a place I thought my life was threatened, and or I was worried about the safety of my family.  Who the hell would "choose" to live in a place like that.   I have been coming here for more than 25 years, and have lived here for 5 years, and as somebody else stated, I have not had any problems at all.   I travel by myself all the time, whether its going to the store or market, driving down to Manila or Sta Rosa etc...   I try to maintain situational awareness, but that is just ingrained in my DNA, and it is not more acute living in the Philippines.   If you are planning on living in Tondo, Jolo island etc. then I would be concerned on a daily basis.   But, again, why would somebody want to live here if they thought their safety or the safety of their family was an ongoing daily concern?   Be smart, choose a decent area, dont mingle with drug addicts, don't venture into places with "undesirable" people, and dont walk thru tondo dangling a rolex....   That advice applies to anywhere on this planet.
Title: Re: Security at Home
Post by: David690 on June 25, 2017, 05:35:03 PM
storing supplies for security purposes?  I guess if you are expecting an apocalypse?    All joking aside much of it depends on where you live and how you carry yourself.   Based on how some people live here, I am surprised they would want to live here.  Personally I would not want to live in a place I thought my life was threatened, and or I was worried about the safety of my family.  Who the hell would "choose" to live in a place like that.   I have been coming here for more than 25 years, and have lived here for 5 years, and as somebody else stated, I have not had any problems at all.   I travel by myself all the time, whether its going to the store or market, driving down to Manila or Sta Rosa etc...   I try to maintain situational awareness, but that is just ingrained in my DNA, and it is not more acute living in the Philippines.   If you are planning on living in Tondo, Jolo island etc. then I would be concerned on a daily basis.   But, again, why would somebody want to live here if they thought their safety or the safety of their family was an ongoing daily concern?   Be smart, choose a decent area, dont mingle with drug addicts, don't venture into places with "undesirable" people, and dont walk thru tondo dangling a rolex....   That advice applies to anywhere on this planet.
Yup, that some up my way of thinking also.
Title: Re: Security at Home
Post by: JoeLP on June 25, 2017, 05:50:29 PM
I am sad to say that I can't help much with roofs.  I live in a dome.

What I will say is that the title Mason here is ....... uhmmmm .... loosely applied. 

So Caveat Emptor.

A lot of the users here have built.  Go through the construction posts.   Makes for hilarious reading.

All the cement roofs I have seen built here are really just cement floors put on top of the top level of the home.  I have seen 3 of them being built.  And 2 of them the owners actually use as a patio with chairs and tables and all that bru-ha-ha going on when the things are finished. 

Draw back?  They are only good for about an hour a day because they are not shaded or protected.  I guess if you lighted them they would be good for longer as you could use them after dark.  But the ones I see the man uses it to drink his coffee in the morning and once in a while around sunset they'll come out and sit at one of their tables.  They live "behind" our compound and have plans to add lighting so it's more usable.  But for now not that much of an investment.

The other two are just down the street and are neighbors.  The one set it up and also uses it sparingly while the other just set it up with some extra reinforcements and put his water tank up there.

But there were all built in the same fashion of beams connected from the side columns at the side of the house with a cement pad poured over the beams using forms between the beams.  The one that has the water tank had an extra set of columns run from the bottom level up 3 levels to the roof and put and extra beam between the 2 normal beams.

So...if you're happy with a "floor" design being used as your roof....that's always and option.
Title: Re: Security at Home
Post by: David690 on June 25, 2017, 07:27:23 PM
Yup, that sums up my way of thinking also.
Title: Re: Security at Home
Post by: HappyBee on June 25, 2017, 08:30:31 PM
Happybee it's gonna be a wake up call our first super typhoon and it's at that point a concrete roof makes sense, you won't have trouble finding anyone who can build a roof let alone a 2nd floor concrete flooring, they are pretty much the same, you'll want to be involved in the process, and you wouldn't believe how dangerous looking concrete houses and condo's look like before they put the finishing touches, buying a home already built is earthquake scary.  I wouldn't want any maid in our house, lessons learned and I can do my own dishes, I'd put those bars on the windows, actually, you can have your windows made rather cheaply with bars, we had several HUGE windows made for our home.  Here's a link to what the concrete roof should look like. [url]http://tinyurl.com/ybxrveko[/url] ([url]http://tinyurl.com/ybxrveko[/url])


Yes, having a concrete roof during a typhoon would be much less nerve-racking. Thanks for the link!
Title: Re: Security at Home
Post by: M.C.A. on June 26, 2017, 02:16:54 PM
HappyBee here's another recent link on violence in those so called safe private neighborhoods, the owner didn't have bars on his windows or steel doors, they busted down his glass window door, this happened 3 days ago, the family allowed to live but American shot in the head, he didn't make it.

I feel I've done my duty as a fellow expat to warn others to put bars on your windows and steel doors, the other entry would be the from the roof, real easy to compromise if made out of any other roofing other than concrete.  These guys scaled the fence walls so those weren't much good either other than for show, barbwire and the works should be in place.  Gee what happened to those underpaid gate guards...they always disappear and they'll have a great story to tell on that.

 http://news.mb.com.ph/2017/06/23/3-suspects-in-us-traders-murder-jailed-in-cavite/ (http://news.mb.com.ph/2017/06/23/3-suspects-in-us-traders-murder-jailed-in-cavite/)
Title: Re: Security at Home
Post by: JD on June 26, 2017, 02:48:50 PM
We have an 8-foot wall topped with pointy angle bars in front. Our main gate is barred across the center and has independent rebar bolts that drop into the concrete drive. The side walls are 4 feet of wall with 4-foot pointy angle bars. The rear wall is 10-feet topped with barbed wire. Our windows are all barred (tastefully) on the inside. We have a dog. We have some CCTV.

Critically, we chose Davao to live in because of its reputation as a safer place. I'm sure there is a lot of petty crime here but there's fewer big crimes (murder, carjacking, etc.). I don't even hear of the Jeepney bag cutters here like there are in some cities.

I lived in an unsecured, planned neighborhood not far from here while we built this house. There were loud parties in the street on occasion, but no one ever hacked to death in a drunken rage. I think the people here are just different to a certain degree.
Title: Re: Security at Home
Post by: HappyBee on June 26, 2017, 05:31:20 PM
storing supplies for security purposes?  I guess if you are expecting an apocalypse?    All joking aside much of it depends on where you live and how you carry yourself.   Based on how some people live here, I am surprised they would want to live here.  Personally I would not want to live in a place I thought my life was threatened, and or I was worried about the safety of my family.  Who the hell would "choose" to live in a place like that.   I have been coming here for more than 25 years, and have lived here for 5 years, and as somebody else stated, I have not had any problems at all.   I travel by myself all the time, whether its going to the store or market, driving down to Manila or Sta Rosa etc...   I try to maintain situational awareness, but that is just ingrained in my DNA, and it is not more acute living in the Philippines.   If you are planning on living in Tondo, Jolo island etc. then I would be concerned on a daily basis.   But, again, why would somebody want to live here if they thought their safety or the safety of their family was an ongoing daily concern?   Be smart, choose a decent area, dont mingle with drug addicts, don't venture into places with "undesirable" people, and dont walk thru tondo dangling a rolex....   That advice applies to anywhere on this planet.

To illustrate the fact that having some food supplies can be a good idea, I once lived in a place that was suddenly cut off by flooding... the flood didn't dissipate for about a month. It was at least a week before people were able to invent ways of getting across the water. Eventually delivery trucks were able to get through, but if this was a smaller town and the stores weren't so well stocked we might have been going hungry for a while. I have heard of other barangays where this has happened and people basically survived on what they had in the house or on the farm.

If a big typhoon is coming I usually stock up on the basics in case the stores run out of stock afterwards, in the event that stocks can't be delivered. But to have them on hand in case of a sudden natural disaster like a big earthquake or I guess tsunami, could be something we might be thankful we did afterwards. Depends on where one lives I guess.

As for not wanting to live in an unsafe area... definitely true. The only thing is sometimes us Kanos don't get the full story before we buy land or build a house somewhere... also security situations can change and I guess Marawi is a case in point.
Title: Re: Security at Home
Post by: M.C.A. on June 26, 2017, 05:40:07 PM
We have an 8-foot wall topped with pointy angle bars in front. Our main gate is barred across the center and has independent rebar bolts that drop into the concrete drive. The side walls are 4 feet of wall with 4-foot pointy angle bars. The rear wall is 10-feet topped with barbed wire. Our windows are all barred (tastefully) on the inside. We have a dog. We have some CCTV.

Critically, we chose Davao to live in because of its reputation as a safer place. I'm sure there is a lot of petty crime here but there's fewer big crimes (murder, carjacking, etc.). I don't even hear of the Jeepney bag cutters here like there are in some cities.

I lived in an unsecured, planned neighborhood not far from here while we built this house. There were loud parties in the street on occasion, but no one ever hacked to death in a drunken rage. I think the people here are just different to a certain degree.

JD that wall sounds awesome... and the same with your barred windows also the fact that you are in a planned neighborhood and not a private community, I think you'll be alright.   :)
Title: Re: Security at Home
Post by: lost_in_samoa on June 26, 2017, 06:13:12 PM
food supplies

I look at it this way.  For 7 thousand years or so of recorded history, humans have been storing food in a variety of different methods.  All with the same goal in mind.  To keep the butt at a minimum diameter.  Which should be every sane person's bottom line goal.

Most of the bizarre stuff we consume evolved from a preservation method.  Cheese, bagoong, kambucha, kimchi, pickles, toyu, salami.  People didn't just say one day,  "Hey lets take this cabbage, coat it with hot peppers and vinegar and bury it in the ground for a year.  Then eat it.  Boy that sounds good!

We've only had refrigeration on a mass scale for 70 years or so.  What data set are you gonna rely on? Seven millennium or seven decades.  A person would be foolish to ignore all that hard earned experience in favor of what the marketing team from Mc-JollyBee says.

Personally we are fortunate.  My sweetie picked up the habit of canning from the older ladies on my side of the family.  It's her hobby now.  This week she put back 15 quarts of pena in light syrup.   Every time there is a sale on something at the wet market she makes a run at it.   As a result our food expenses are negligible.  We have a large family and a lot of workers.

We have also found that pressure canning transforms foods that are almost inedible into staples. Water buffalo for example.   Normally it is only fit for shoe and tire repair.  But after it is processed into the jar it tastes very much like canned beef.  I believe the Brits call it " Bully Beef".

Sorry I digress.  It just makes me sad on a fundamental level to see what masquerades as wisdom these days.
Title: Re: Security at Home
Post by: jjcabgou on June 26, 2017, 06:22:20 PM
I look at it this way.  For 7 thousand years or so of recorded history, humans have been storing food in a variety of different methods.  All with the same goal in mind.  To keep the butt at a minimum diameter.  Which should be every sane person's bottom line goal.

Most of the bizarre stuff we consume evolved from a preservation method.  Cheese, bagoong, kambucha, kimchi, pickles, toyu, salami.  People didn't just say one day,  "Hey lets take this cabbage, coat it with hot peppers and vinegar and bury it in the ground for a year.  Then eat it.  Boy that sounds good!

We've only had refrigeration on a mass scale for 70 years or so.  What data set are you gonna rely on? Seven millennium or seven decades.  A person would be foolish to ignore all that hard earned experience in favor of what the marketing team from Mc-JollyBee says.

Personally we are fortunate.  My sweetie picked up the habit of canning from the older ladies on my side of the family.  It's her hobby now.  This week she put back 15 quarts of pena in light syrup.   Every time there is a sale on something at the wet market she makes a run at it.   As a result our food expenses are negligible.  We have a large family and a lot of workers.

We have also found that pressure canning transforms foods that are almost inedible into staples. Water buffalo for example.   Normally it is only fit for shoe and tire repair.  But after it is processed into the jar it tastes very much like canned beef.  I believe the Brits call it " Bully Beef".

Sorry I digress.  It just makes me sad on a fundamental level to see what masquerades as wisdom these days.

You had me until the last sentence.   Regarding "wisdom" I guess my bad, I did not connect the dots to the initial "Security" question to storing grub.   I did not believe, and still dont, that the intent was other than security.   Having said that, what you are doing is actually pretty cool, and more people should do things such as that for a variety of reasons.  The most important one that comes to mind is, you know exactly what you are putting in your body, free from chemicals, pesticides, and the other bazaar things that get into our food.
Title: Re: Security at Home
Post by: lost_in_samoa on June 26, 2017, 06:56:15 PM
I guess my bad

I was not targeting anybody.  So no need to apologize.  I do appreciate the sentiment though.  Thank you. 

I was just waxing melancholic.
Title: Re: Security at Home
Post by: FastWalk on June 26, 2017, 10:59:40 PM
+1 on the concrete roof idea,  for lots of reasons.

Yolanda(super typhoon 2013 ) took our attic (that is now a concrete roof) at our beach house.  Suggest to use steel decking under the concrete.  The link from M.C.A looks really good.  But use the steel decking under it.  Make sure to have a stairs to the roof.  Then can have a waiting shed there to protect from the rain or sun.  The roof access of course needs a locked secure door also.

If a storm takes the roof,  then no security at all until fixed..

Title: Re: Security at Home
Post by: JD on June 27, 2017, 11:25:30 AM
JD that wall sounds awesome... and the same with your barred windows also the fact that you are in a planned neighborhood and not a private community, I think you'll be alright.   :)

Oh, we're not in a planned community anymore. We lived in one while we built. We're just off a secondary road, on land that was owned by our neighbor's parents. The large parcel was subdivided for family members and our 768sqm lot changed hands a couple of times. The title was clear, though.
Title: Re: Security at Home
Post by: JD on June 27, 2017, 11:33:26 AM
To illustrate the fact that having some food supplies can be a good idea, I once lived in a place that was suddenly cut off by flooding... the flood didn't dissipate for about a month. It was at least a week before people were able to invent ways of getting across the water. Eventually delivery trucks were able to get through, but if this was a smaller town and the stores weren't so well stocked we might have been going hungry for a while. I have heard of other barangays where this has happened and people basically survived on what they had in the house or on the farm.

After the Nisqually (Washington State) quake in 2000, I began keeping a store of food and water in our condo in Seattle. Seemed prudent. Although we're not in the typhoon path down here in Davao, we're at the mercy of earthquakes like everyone else. It seems prudent to keep extra canned good and such on hand in case the SHTF. Eventually, it probably will.
Title: Re: Security at Home
Post by: M.C.A. on June 27, 2017, 01:12:23 PM
+1 on the concrete roof idea,  for lots of reasons.

Yolanda(super typhoon 2013 ) took our attic (that is now a concrete roof) at our beach house.  Suggest to use steel decking under the concrete.  The link from M.C.A looks really good.  But use the steel decking under it.  Make sure to have a stairs to the roof.  Then can have a waiting shed there to protect from the rain or sun.  The roof access of course needs a locked secure door also.

If a storm takes the roof,  then no security at all until fixed..

Fastwalk, you're blessed with a conrete roof, I too lost my roof to Typhoon Glenda but I don't have the funds for a concrete roof yet, I might need to do this little by little, my roof was put back on with the old materials and some we bought, the wood is rotten in many areas and the metal roofing is junk now, holes everywhere, inlaws got our best roofing, they stacked it up right next to their shacks... Lol, real wake up call for my wife thank God and she's finally onboard and no longer a wannabe Mother Teresa, she finally seen her family for what they are, same with the neighbors... so ambitious for expensive work.   >:(

JD your location just off a planned neighborhood is an even better location.   :)

Title: Re: Security at Home
Post by: M.C.A. on June 27, 2017, 01:19:17 PM
After the Nisqually (Washington State) quake in 2000, I began keeping a store of food and water in our condo in Seattle. Seemed prudent. Although we're not in the typhoon path down here in Davao, we're at the mercy of earthquakes like everyone else. It seems prudent to keep extra canned good and such on hand in case the SHTF. Eventually, it probably will.

The aftermath of a serious Typhoon leaves the shelves bare of descent tasting canned foods and all that's left is sardines, so corn beef and spam at the top of that list for sure, hoarding is a real concern, another issue is infrastructure and electricity, you have money but in the form of plastic forget it. 

After Typhoon Glenda and the loss of my roof, all my available money was going to roof repairs and I couldn't use the plastic real embarrassing... I had to leave my cart at the counter, but I did have some chickens and goats I had been raising the got us through till the roof was on and the internet working for credit card or debit charges, banks also had issues, no internet they hold your bank book, you need to return another day to pick it up.
Title: Re: Security at Home
Post by: lost_in_samoa on June 27, 2017, 01:56:00 PM
Typhoon Glenda


I empathize.  I am a disaster magnet.  Storms seem to hunt us down. 

When I was a kid the house burned down.  Then tornado's took it ...... twice.  I rode hurricane Hugo across the Atlantic in a FFG.  Circled offshore while it creamed our home port of Charleston.  Then cleaned up. 

We were hit 4 times by cat 4/5 cyclones in 7 years in Samoa.  Lost the roof 3 times.  Enjoyed a couple of 8+ earthquakes and got to surf one of the resulting tsunami's in my Ford Ranger. 

Then there is the "people" troubles that always follow these things.

Main reason we built our Most earth-bag dome (http://www.calearth.org/superadobe-structures-calearth/).  It was the most disaster proof structure I could find.

Most B.F.A.'s (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=d-diB65scQU) think  we stock because we are afraid.  Not so.  We prep because we are experienced.

A "conservative" is a liberal that has been mugged.  And a "prepper" is a conservative that's been mugged.  ;-)

Title: Re: Security at Home
Post by: HappyBee on June 27, 2017, 06:07:10 PM
+1 on the concrete roof idea,  for lots of reasons.

Yolanda(super typhoon 2013 ) took our attic (that is now a concrete roof) at our beach house.  Suggest to use steel decking under the concrete.  The link from M.C.A looks really good.  But use the steel decking under it.  Make sure to have a stairs to the roof.  Then can have a waiting shed there to protect from the rain or sun.  The roof access of course needs a locked secure door also.

If a storm takes the roof,  then no security at all until fixed..

Sorry to hear that your property sustained damage from the typhoon. What do you mean by steel decking? It must have another name where I am from. I was thinking about using hardwood planks underneath the concrete roof to make it look pretty from the inside... but I dunno whether they would do much in terms of supporting it.
Title: Re: Security at Home
Post by: jjcabgou on June 27, 2017, 06:41:35 PM
Here is a great link, it identifies American deaths by a time period in the Philippines.
in 2016 there were 8 Americans murdered in the Philippines.   Best data I can find is there are over 250,000 Americans living in the Philippines (does anybody have better data).   And that does not count visitors.


https://travel.state.gov/content/travel/en/statistics/deaths.html

I wish I could find a site that included all expats.
Title: Re: Security at Home
Post by: jjcabgou on June 27, 2017, 06:44:29 PM
now I am seeing numbers closer to 30,000 americans living in the Philippines, this 'seems' more accurate.
Title: Re: Security at Home
Post by: jjcabgou on June 27, 2017, 06:51:05 PM
I did the math using 30,000 Americans.

If you were an American living in the Philippines in 2016 you had a 0.026666666666667% chance of being murdered.
Title: Re: Security at Home
Post by: JD on June 27, 2017, 07:04:44 PM
Sorry to hear that your property sustained damage from the typhoon. What do you mean by steel decking? It must have another name where I am from. I was thinking about using hardwood planks underneath the concrete roof to make it look pretty from the inside... but I dunno whether they would do much in terms of supporting it.

It's no different than modern buildings anywhere. I snagged this off of the interwebs:

Title: Re: Security at Home
Post by: HappyBee on June 28, 2017, 01:59:49 PM
It's no different than modern buildings anywhere. I snagged this off of the interwebs:

Thanks!