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Author Topic: Moving permanently to Philippines  (Read 5959 times)

theislandrooster

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Moving permanently to Philippines
« on: April 20, 2009, 05:59:20 AM »
Hello every one I\'m new to this forum, but have been monitoring another Philippine forum for a few weeks. I\'m married to a Philippine lady for several years. I am planning on retiring this summer and move to Philippines. What is our best option for us to live in the Philippines on the long term with out having to exit the country every year. I hear of a retirement program where one deposits I believe $10,000.00 dollars in a Phil. Bank, then I hear that my wife can deposit in her name $1500.00 and I come as her spouse. I\'ve heard something of a article 13 visa,  My question is what are my options to stay in Philippine on long term with the least amount of red tape and expense? What is the pro and con of each option.
I  have written letters to the Philippine Consulate in Chicago but have yet to recieve a response that I can under stand. I will have a secure pension and income, and plan to build a house on land my wife owns. Please give me your thoughts on my problem.  Thanks  William 

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Re: Moving permanently to Philippines
« Reply #1 on: April 20, 2009, 06:34:28 AM »
If your wife is or was a Philippine citizen you can get your 13A before you come to the Philippines. That\'s what I did. Go to your closest Philippine consulate and ask them for the requirements. I did it that way and it is less expensive and less time hanging around immigration. Dick

Offline Gray Wolf

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Re: Moving permanently to Philippines
« Reply #2 on: April 20, 2009, 06:37:05 AM »
Hello every one I\'m new to this forum, but have been monitoring another Philippine forum for a few weeks. I\'m married to a Philippine lady for several years. I am planning on retiring this summer and move to Philippines. What is our best option for us to live in the Philippines on the long term with out having to exit the country every year. I hear of a retirement program where one deposits I believe $10,000.00 dollars in a Phil. Bank, then I hear that my wife can deposit in her name $1500.00 and I come as her spouse. I\'ve heard something of a article 13 visa,  My question is what are my options to stay in Philippine on long term with the least amount of red tape and expense? What is the pro and con of each option.
I  have written letters to the Philippine Consulate in Chicago but have yet to recieve a response that I can under stand. I will have a secure pension and income, and plan to build a house on land my wife owns. Please give me your thoughts on my problem.  Thanks  William 


William,

I wouldn\'t hold my breath for a definitive answer from the Philippine Consulate.   ;)

IMHO, by far the easiest and cheapest in the long run is the 13a visa.  If your wife has maintained her Filipino citizenship, you can easily qualify.  Check out this topic under our Visa board:
http://livinginthephilippines.com/forum/index.php/board,58.0.html   There are at least three separate threads on the 13a.  I suggest you read all three and then if you have further questions, feel free to jump in and ask away.

Welcome to LinPC!
Louisville, KY USA - Bagong Silang, Caloocan City, PH

theislandrooster

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Re: Moving permanently to Philippines
« Reply #3 on: April 20, 2009, 07:01:11 AM »
My wife became a US Citizen nearly 20 yrs. ago, and carries a US passport. I do not believe she is considered a Philippine citizen once she became citizen here. Can she become a dual citizen and how is this accomplished? Any guidance would be appreciated. Thank you

Offline aerosick

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Re: Moving permanently to Philippines
« Reply #4 on: April 20, 2009, 07:19:13 AM »
My wife became a US Citizen nearly 20 yrs. ago, and carries a US passport. I do not believe she is considered a Philippine citizen once she became citizen here. Can she become a dual citizen and how is this accomplished? Any guidance would be appreciated. Thank you


Try these Topics:

http://livinginthephilippines.com/forum/index.php/board,61.0.html

Billy
"We're here to preserve democracy, not practice it."

Gene Hackman: Crimson Tide ~ 1995

theislandrooster

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Re: Moving permanently to Philippines
« Reply #5 on: April 20, 2009, 08:28:52 AM »
Thank you for the information. One more question, Is it true that there is a program of the Philippine retirement authority that my wife can deposit $1500.00  and we both become legal permanent full time residents. What is the down side of this route? I talked to my wife and we are going to drive up to chicago next month to the Philippine consulant and see if we can get her citizen ship back and apply for the article 13 visa. Thanks again. William

Offline Steve & Myrlita

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  • Myrlita & I and all of our grandchildren.
Re: Moving permanently to Philippines
« Reply #6 on: April 20, 2009, 10:50:36 AM »
Thank you for the information. One more question, Is it true that there is a program of the Philippine retirement authority that my wife can deposit $1500.00  and we both become legal permanent full time residents. What is the down side of this route? I talked to my wife and we are going to drive up to Chicago next month to the Philippine consultant and see if we can get her citizen ship back and apply for the article 13 visa. Thanks again. William
Greetings William & welcome. The easiest way is for your wife to spend the $50 at the Philippines Embassy and take the oath to reacquire her Filipino citizenship and get a Philippine passport as a dual citizen. Then you can apply for the 13A visa. Much cheaper option as well as better for she can buy land as a Filipino citizen.  God Bless....
Thank you...God Bless...
Bro Steve & Sis Myrlita
Bacolod City, PH
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Offline Gray Wolf

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Re: Moving permanently to Philippines
« Reply #7 on: April 20, 2009, 10:46:51 PM »
Thank you for the information. One more question, Is it true that there is a program of the Philippine retirement authority that my wife can deposit $1500.00  and we both become legal permanent full time residents. What is the down side of this route? I talked to my wife and we are going to drive up to chicago next month to the Philippine consulant and see if we can get her citizen ship back and apply for the article 13 visa. Thanks again. William


$1500?  Your wife can reacquire her Philippines citizenship, become a dual citizen, and become a legal, permanent, full time resident by simply moving back to the Philippines.  No need to spend $1500.  You would then qualify to apply for a 13a visa and live there full time without having to exit the country for any reason.

Keep in mind, your wife must first reacquire her Philippine citizenship before you can file for the 13a.  Can\'t reach home late unless you round first base!   ;D ;D

For more info on your wife reacquiring her Philippine citizenship, check out this topic:
http://livinginthephilippines.com/forum/index.php/board,61.0.html

Good luck!  Keep us all informed of your and her progress.
Louisville, KY USA - Bagong Silang, Caloocan City, PH

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Re: Moving permanently to Philippines
« Reply #8 on: April 21, 2009, 10:06:44 AM »
What happens to American husband if one moves to Philippiines on a 13A visa and the Filipina wife should die first? Does the husband have any rights to stay in Philippines till his death? What a about property? I don\"t think he has any rights to any thing of value shared
by him and his wife. With a will he might have limited protection.

Offline dutch expat

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Re: Moving permanently to Philippines
« Reply #9 on: April 21, 2009, 12:30:56 PM »
I have found some (not final) answers concerning the 13A visa here http://www.joepallugna.com/marriages-filipinas.html.
About inheritance laws, have a look at this site http://www.globalpropertyguide.com/Asia/Philippines/Inheritance

Offline imtheredrum

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Re: Moving permanently to Philippines
« Reply #10 on: April 21, 2009, 01:36:26 PM »
What happens to American husband if one moves to Philippiines on a 13A visa and the Filipina wife should die first? Does the husband have any rights to stay in Philippines till his death? What a about property? I don\"t think he has any rights to any thing of value shared
by him and his wife. With a will he might have limited protection.

Before I married my Asawa, I purchased some land in her name.  I had the lawyer draw up a 50 year lease from her in her maiden name. Few months later we married.  I can own the house, but the property would go to her children.  The 50 year lease allows me to stay.  If your wife has no children or relative...LOL then the lease would assure you that you could stay on the land till the lease expired.  I for one won\'t make the 50 years...LOL.

You never know, the Constitution may get changed over the next few years and allow a retiring foreigner to own his own homestead... hoping anyway...
..                                \ \ \ | / / /
..                                  ( @ @~)
Jeff & Ritz  -----o00o-(. .)-o00o-----

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Re: Moving permanently to Philippines
« Reply #11 on: April 21, 2009, 11:56:56 PM »
Hello,

I\'m finding this discussion very helpful, I just came from the\" Living in Philippine 3 forum \",
(http://groups.yahoo.com/group/LivingInThePhilippines3/)   and in the last few days there has been questions on the 13A visa. One that interested me was on coming and going to the Philippines. I\'m planning on getting 13A also and me stay an in a rental condo near Manila as we just sold our house here, but my wife plans on going back  to her job here in USA, I may have to go back at times to attend to business interests. The question is, can one move freely in and out of the Philippines freely at any with out losing you rights and extra expense and paper work? Can the American stay in the Philippines for long periods while spouse is still working in USA? You may want to check check out the \"Living in Philippine 3 Forum\" as there appears to be some one going to the Philippine consulate to attempt to get a ruling on this matter.

Offline imtheredrum

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Re: Moving permanently to Philippines
« Reply #12 on: April 22, 2009, 02:49:34 PM »
Hello,

I\'m finding this discussion very helpful, I just came from the\" Living in Philippine 3 forum \",
(http://groups.yahoo.com/group/LivingInThePhilippines3/)   and in the last few days there has been questions on the 13A visa. One that interested me was on coming and going to the Philippines. I\'m planning on getting 13A also and me stay an in a rental condo near Manila as we just sold our house here, but my wife plans on going back  to her job here in USA, I may have to go back at times to attend to business interests. The question is, can one move freely in and out of the Philippines freely at any with out losing you rights and extra expense and paper work? Can the American stay in the Philippines for long periods while spouse is still working in USA? You may want to check check out the \"Living in Philippine 3 Forum\" as there appears to be some one going to the Philippine consulate to attempt to get a ruling on this matter.


The legal process of acquiring an I card (Permanent Immigrant Card) is a two stage process. Your wife has to write a letter to the head of Immigrations in Manila, requesting your change of status.  Fill out the application with 2x2 pic and attach wife\'s NSO birth certificate and NSO certified marrage certificate. Make 2 more copies.  For a different price, file from Davao, Cagaayan De Oro, or Butuan (maybe other places that have BI offices)or for a lot less, Cebu or Manila (all roads go through Manila). In one, two, or three months, you will get a notice that requires you to return to your filing office to get your passport stamped and photographed for your (TEMPORARY) I card. (travel restriction do apply). You had better verify, because it used to be 2 trips and a max of 30 days!
In your 9th month, start the permanent application... Very similar, except a physical, blood, urine and other tests are required, as well as a financial requirements.  Again, takes 1 to 3 months, with similar fees.  Once you get the Permanent I Card, there are no travel restrictions.  An example of pricing... Butuan-40k to 45k; Davao?; CDO 35k to 40k; Cebu 2500k fees + 2000k so I did not have to return in 10 days for a meeting; Manila?  There are many lawyers out there that will help with the process for fees that range from 35k to 75k.

I\'m sure others here know far more than I.  Hope this helps a little and good luck!

Jeff & Ritz
..                                \ \ \ | / / /
..                                  ( @ @~)
Jeff & Ritz  -----o00o-(. .)-o00o-----

Hotbandit

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Re: Moving permanently to Philippines
« Reply #13 on: April 25, 2009, 09:25:33 PM »
Hello every one I\'m new to this forum and this is my first time on any forum. I\'m not married and I\'m looking at retiring in the Philippines within the next year or two. What type of Visa do i need to move around freely in the Philippines? Also I will still need to fly between the Philippines and Japan once every three months to check on my business there.  Thanks Ken

Offline aerosick

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Re: Moving permanently to Philippines
« Reply #14 on: April 26, 2009, 12:16:56 AM »
Get a Multiple Entry Visa valid for twelve (12) months $90.00.

Billy

Hello every one I\'m new to this forum and this is my first time on any forum. I\'m not married and I\'m looking at retiring in the Philippines within the next year or two. What type of Visa do i need to move around freely in the Philippines? Also I will still need to fly between the Philippines and Japan once every three months to check on my business there.  Thanks Ken
"We're here to preserve democracy, not practice it."

Gene Hackman: Crimson Tide ~ 1995