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Author Topic: building a house in philippines  (Read 4740 times)

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building a house in philippines
« on: May 23, 2009, 10:40:16 PM »
Hi Guys I just found this site whilst looking for traditional houses in the Philippines. The site may be a Godsend if I ever work out how to use it properly [im computer illiterate-ish] My wife is a filippina..Q.C. her family have land in the \'province\' and I am interested in building a decent quality wooden structure with a terrace there. Maybe the family will keep pigs. Any advice particularly regarding what I can expect to spend and how to proceed?? regards guys and I hope to be a regular here- i have a small aparmtment in Spain i hope to rent out to finance future medium term stays in the Philippines. cheers.  :D

Offline geno555

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Re: building a house in philippines
« Reply #1 on: May 24, 2009, 06:24:17 AM »
Welcome to both you and your beautiful wife, aren\'t we blessed~

There is  a ton of house building information on here , in fact if you go to the home page, follow the left hand column down to announcements and shout outs you will find were I am finally breaking ground for our dream house, Not much but certainly well above the napa hut. ;D  I hope lol.

I have in my time on this earth built two other houses both out of wood that turned out wonderful, but I would do more research if it was me about your choice of building materials. Unless you use Nara (a rather expensive but very hard wood) or a couple of other kinds which i can\'t remember their names right now, you will run into the problem with the ever present and prolific problem of thousands of terminates taking up residence in your home eating their way as they go. Of course you can try treated wood but even there you have to be so careful and make sure any cuts that you make that the ends are sealed and treated to. Not saying it can\'t be done, but this is the RP and some things here you just have to look around at the foreigners houses and you will find 90 % of them concrete hollow block, and even there you have to be careful you don\'t buy just normal construction grade hollow block but make your own where you only get around 40 blocks per bag of Portland cement.

You find things here in the RP, that are all about a matter of \"learning to adapt from your normal way of thinking\", that requires some swallowing of your own pride sometimes, but could lead you to success in the long run.

Welcome to the forum and you will find many friendly souls here much wiser than I who can also willing give you advice.

The RP can certainly be a land of paradise, but without doing your homework you will find yourself running back to your home country with your tail stuck between your legs, It is a place of one of the most friendly, loyal, kind and compassionate people that you could ever ask for as neighbors, if you are not the neighborly type, then find you a piece of property well off the beaten path so you won\'t have so much foot traffic passing in front of your house.

I an a people person so I live in what i like to call my own slice of \"the rumble in the jungle\" , i am surrounded by neighbors who probably spend more time in my Nanay house than they do their own, and as far as children I could watch them play for hours so the more of them the happier I am.

So welcome to the Land of Paradise if you choose to make it such.

Good Luck in all your future endeavors. Keep in touch.

The
Murf

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Re: building a house in philippines
« Reply #2 on: May 24, 2009, 07:38:32 AM »
Hi Guys I just found this site whilst looking for traditional houses in the Philippines. The site may be a Godsend if I ever work out how to use it properly [im computer illiterate-ish] My wife is a filippina..Q.C. her family have land in the \'province\' and I am interested in building a decent quality wooden structure with a terrace there. Maybe the family will keep pigs. Any advice particularly regarding what I can expect to spend and how to proceed?? regards guys and I hope to be a regular here- i have a small aparmtment in Spain i hope to rent out to finance future medium term stays in the Philippines. cheers.  :D

Hi LC,

You can build a very nice Nippa style house very cheaply, but it will require some care and maintenance if you want it to last. The uprights should be hardwood and the walls suwali (woven split bamboo) preferably double thickness. If heavily varnished, it will look good and last a bit longer. The floors should be raised above the ground, and if not made of bamboo will need regular replacing. Ideally the roof should be nippa, this gives good insulation, but will need to be repaired frequently. The alternative is iron sheets, both hot and noisy when it rains. Not sure of prices, but it is the type of house built by even the poorest people here, so very minimal. You will need to spend a little more to add good toilets etc.

Some of my wifes family work on a prison farm and their houses are wood with metal roofs, and they are at least 50 years old. When I go there, I have to be careful where I walk because the floor is very weak in places because of the termites  ;D The main uprights are original, about 12 inches square and as hard as concrete.

Colin

Offline Gray Wolf

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Re: building a house in philippines
« Reply #3 on: May 24, 2009, 08:41:42 AM »
A very good friend of mine who lives in in the Visayas region built a terrific bamboo house.  Here are some clickable thumbnail images. 





It may look \"native\" on the outside, but it\'s relatively modern inside.

Kitchen and coffee bar


View of living room and dining area from kitchen


Completely modern \"CR\"



The house is built around a concrete base, which doubles as the laundry area and also serves as a \"receiving area\". 



The house is about 1,450 sq ft (135 sq mtr) and sits on a fenced 2,500 sq mtr lot.  He also owns the adjacent lot, also 2,500 sq mtr, planted with lots of mangoes and Mahogany trees.  Total cost for the property and house construction was roughly $18,000.

Nice place!   

Louisville, KY USA - Bagong Silang, Caloocan City, PH

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Re: building a house in philippines
« Reply #4 on: May 24, 2009, 06:45:00 PM »
   Grey Wolf,  Colin and the Murf..
          thanks so much for the swift reply..the pics are amazing..I\'m dreaming of something along these lines with wrap round type balcony. My wife fears I\'m guna build a \'shack\' taking her backward rather than \'progressing\' obviously i wont build anything she\'s not happy with.

    The pics here and the information give me great heart. I\'m not wishing to buy a new build-can\'tafford/don\'t want the debt. Plus it\'s my DREAM to be under a fan in a quality wooden house in the \'tropics\' My Oriental dream is asleep beside me 11.40am after chatting online with her mom [ as usual] to 4am   When she stirs I\'ll show her the pics.

     I hope she\'ll agree to my way of thinking because we could provide a debt free home+pig farm for her family soon and a retirement place for ourselves later.

     Thanks again guys..DELIGHTED to be in the forum.
                 Larry

Offline tom.inbigdtexas

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Re: building a house in philippines
« Reply #5 on: May 25, 2009, 04:26:48 AM »
A very good friend of mine who lives in in the Visayas region built a terrific bamboo house.  Here are some clickable thumbnail images............. Nice place!  

Jack, I agree, very nice place. 

Do you know what material the roof is made of?  What Island?  My wife\'s brother, with wife and 6 children, lives near Cebu in a very modest/primative house.  It would be nice to build something similar to this, with maybe a few extra bedrooms, where they could live now and we could \"visit them\" while looking around other areas of the Visayas. 

I love the look inside of the bamboo and built-ins.  Concrete or inlaid stone in the area under the house would also make a nice \"hanging out\" area... or maybe a play area to keep the younger kids out from under our feet  ;D.

Tom 




Dallas, Tx, USA
Mactan, Cebu, PH

Offline dutch expat

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Re: building a house in philippines
« Reply #6 on: May 25, 2009, 08:33:58 AM »
Really a nice bamboo house. How do they keep the termites out?

Offline fred

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Re: building a house in philippines
« Reply #7 on: May 25, 2009, 04:02:51 PM »


Thats a pic of one section of our nipa hut..
The timber to use is Gemilina as it seems pretty much termite proof,just avoid direct contact with the ground.(unless cemented/concreted in.. We treated ours too with brown woodsaver and used engine oil. So far no problems whatsoever.
Bamboo is another matter and must be dunked in a treatment tank for a week before use..
Bamboo is the all time favourite food of the Bok bok which is a flying timber weevil.

Offline Gray Wolf

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Re: building a house in philippines
« Reply #8 on: May 25, 2009, 10:23:24 PM »
The bamboo house is owned by a friend named Don who lives in Amlan, Negros Oriental.  And no, this is not the \"Don\" that owns this forum.   ;)

The roof is made up of palm leaves, but not nipa.  From Don:

\"Oh! Did I say we only have a nipa roof? We bought a little longer, wider fond leaf though....sort of a \'double size\' piece. They are layered with a  2 \" separation, the rest (about a foot and 1/2) is overlapped.  I had fish net stretched over the nipa to keep it down flat in the higher winds....maybe a Signal One storm. Some blew up anyhow....so I  have now also put clips over the whole roof area. Each square is  1\' X1\'.....seems nice and tight / snug.\"

As for Buk-bok resistance:

\"Biggest problem?  Buk-Bok getting into the bamboo and coco lumber beams. YOU MUST BE ABSOLUTELY CERTAIN THAT EVERY SINGLE PIECE OF BAMBOO/ COCO LUMBER IS \'PAINTED\" (Silignum or Wood Saver 50% mixed with either diesel or USED motor oil) INCLUDING THE SAWED ENDS.   It\'s also a good idea to soak the nipa in the same solution before laying -  if possible.
 
I also used Coal Tar to soak post ends that are being set in the ground...several coats - after  being \"painted\" with the Solignum/Woodsaver treatment first   Over-kill? Don\'t think so...... :-))  \"

Larry, this is for you:

\"The front veranda is about 10 \' deep and 44 \' long....a little bit of a \'wrap around\' as it is extended on both sides to accommodate the double front room entrance doors, and on the opposite side of the structure, the door from the  master bedroom.  The main reason it\'s that big is very simple: we have almost 360 degree \"Overlooks\"!  To the south are mist covered mountains;  west (front) has sugar cane fields, the dirt road with all passers by waving/smiling \"Hello\"; to the west north west a nice view of the Negros coastline, being  able to observe the towns of Tanjay, Bais and Manhujoud and distant mountains; to the direct north is the Tanon Straight between our island and Cebu island; then to the north east are some trees and fields - and the Tanon Straight with Cebu island back round; to our east are cane fields and thick trees.

Fresh breezes roll off the mountains in the summer from the south, often times changing direction to come in across the cane fields over the valley looking north west ..off the Tanon Straight...so they are also cooler breezes. Then at times the winds come directly in from the north - again across the Straight.....so - cooler breezes.  We \"Lucked out\"!!  \"
 

As I said, it looks native, but is modern inside.  More from Don:


\"Master bedroom is roughly 17\' X 15\' with a separate half French door to the veranda, a separate entrance to the CR and a full French door to the living area.
 
The fully tiled CR is 6\' X 15\'.   Hollow block walls, poured cement in the spaces with re bars, plastered over for the tile walls. The ceiling is 3/4 marine plywood. In the shower is 1 small, screened, opaque window for ventilation, a point-of-use hot water heater. One side has glass block wall. The enclosed shower is about 5 1/2\'  X 5 1/2\' sq.  No more bumping my big nose against the wall to get directly underneath the shower head! LOL!
 
Since the house is raised up...the area directly underneath the CR is presently an enclosed laundry room - also with a point-of-use hot water heater to the washing machine. This area can be easily and  cheaply converted into a second CR later on if need be.
 
There is also a cold water shower area behind the laundry room ( back side of the house) so I can shower off before going inside ...\"

\"I also put screened windows all around, plus across the whole front of the house...not normally necessary: but again, I wanted the overlooks! 
The cost includes 3 POU electric instant -on hot water heaters. At 7,000 Php each....you could save 14,000Php by not having as many. I just wanted some \'extra stateside\' conveniences...
 
The electrical lines are of maximum recommended heavier gauge...enclosed in the rigid electrical quality pvc conduit...not the cheaper flexible stuff...all Japanese Toshiba switches. main line is  in the ground,in conduit,  not strung on a pole. I also bought a much larger circuit breaker box....no more than 3 outlets on a line ( law allows 10 here !). Seperate lines for microwave, fridge, outside \"security\" corner lights...all extra....and it can, and does, add up. :-))  \"


And more:


\"2ND bedroom is about 11\' X 11\", and the 3rd bedroom  has been converted into  the computer rm / junk storage rm) ......and is small  - about ...9\'X9\'. I have an attic entrance way in the ceiling and electric lights up in the attic from that room.
 
The cocina is about 11\'X 17\' if you include the space for the 2 foot wide coffee bar which makes a nice separation to the dining area. Cocina has double aluminum sinks, hot  point-of-use water heater and cold running water.
 
The dining area and front rm - or living rm, if you like - make up  the rest of the living space. (\"Great Room\"???).  We have double entrance doors in the front room to the veranda.  (Easy to bring in furniture)
 
BTW...my asawa didn\'t understand, at all, the convenience of a \"Coffee Bar\" at the end of the kitchen counter. Now that it\'s there, we have only eaten one time on the 13,000Php dining room set!  Ha,ha. We have 2 high back stools to sit on...and the coffee bar is our \"meeting place\"...breakfast, lunch, coffee any time, dinners, making notes, paper-work, just sitting chatting, or turning the stools and watching the other TV. She LOVES it!  She jokes that if she had known, she wouldn\'t have bought either the dining set OR the living room furniture!\"

Even more:

\"No air conditioning is necessary. The house breathes!   (Some will say it doesn\'t \"breathe\" at all - it leaks!   ROTFLMAO!!)  The 10\' high walls are  covered with savali as is the ceiling. We have one larger style ceiling fan in the bedroom. One movable floor fan that\'s usually in the computer room. The extra height of the walls and the savali ceiling allow the hotter airs to dissipate up and out  through the ceiling into the attic - which is well ventilated. In summer, when I come inside from working outside, it often feels as if the whole house has central air.....yeah - it can be that much cooler inside!  :-)) \"


Also:

\"I also want to point out that these outside pics are somewhat old , a bit outdated as we have pained the outside of the house - it really looks great: the dwarf coconut palms are MUCH bigger already, as are all the other trees: the entrance drive boulders and 25 meter long driveway edge stones have been painted white and a border planted on both sides of that driveway ...which is now filled in with stone. \"


Don would tell you that this is pure heaven.  I can\'t disagree with such reasoning.
Louisville, KY USA - Bagong Silang, Caloocan City, PH

Offline maricel

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Re: building a house in philippines
« Reply #9 on: May 26, 2009, 01:08:49 AM »
Hi guys,

Building wooden structures here in the Philippines is not really a nice idea if you are thinking of long term usage due to the presence of termites.  This can be materialized however if you use hardwood that are kiln dried but unfortunately those are not readily available and if you do find one it will cost a lot.  Bamboo is nice too and you can use nipa (leaves) for roofing if you really want a very resort or primitive style but you have to think of replacing it for maintainance once in a while. Feel feel to ask me any question regarding houses in the Philippines.  Hoping you are all enjoying your stay here.  God bless.
God bless you all!

Maricel

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Re: building a house in philippines
« Reply #10 on: May 26, 2009, 03:14:30 AM »
Feel feel to ask me any question regarding houses in the Philippines



Have you personal experience in these constructions? Have you worked or owned a construction company? Please feel free to forward any information and photo\'s of these types of houses you are familiar with to my wife an I.
                     Thank you,
                           Leprechaun and Mrs \'pinay pie\'

Offline fred

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Re: building a house in philippines
« Reply #11 on: May 26, 2009, 09:44:52 AM »
Quote
Hi guys,

Building wooden structures here in the Philippines is not really a nice idea if you are thinking of long term usage due to the presence of termites.  This can be materialized however if you use hardwood that are kiln dried but unfortunately those are not readily available and if you do find one it will cost a lot.  Bamboo is nice too and you can use nipa (leaves) for roofing if you really want a very resort or primitive style but you have to think of replacing it for maintainance once in a while. Feel feel to ask me any question regarding houses in the Philippines.  Hoping you are all enjoying your stay here.  God bless.



Regarding my 18th post...What happened to the pic I posted?? It was there when I posted it!!
Our roof is indeed nipa but we paid extra for them to make it with double leaf..Each piece is at least 2 ft long and 5 ft wide..We paid 5 pesos each.. They are tied on with nylon with 2inch spaces and then a nylon fishing net has been tightly stretched over  the whole thing which prevents the wind blowing the tiles back on themselves..The roof will last up to 15 years.
A more expensive option is Cogon grass..Done properly it will last for 25 years or more which is about the same as an English thatch roof. It also looks so much better(reason resorts use it)..Problem is that the fire hazard is much greater which is why we went with nipa.



Edit..It seems that I cant link pics from Yahoo so that was the problem..


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Re: building a house in philippines
« Reply #12 on: May 26, 2009, 05:01:11 PM »
hey,
     that pic looks great too..i notice the concrete foundation and bases for the posts..[learning] any more pics? very welcome.. I really want to build a financially viable traditional \'tropical dream\' home like that with as many modern mod cons as possible.
                   thanks so much for the help,
                            Leprechaun63

Offline geno555

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Re: building a house in philippines
« Reply #13 on: May 26, 2009, 07:12:24 PM »
plenty more pics coming your way soon just need time to edit and post them, i am glad you understand some of the pictures for i am a great loss lol
the murf

Offline fred

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Re: building a house in philippines
« Reply #14 on: June 02, 2009, 11:35:18 AM »
hey,
     that pic looks great too..i notice the concrete foundation and bases for the posts..[learning] any more pics? very welcome.. I really want to build a financially viable traditional \'tropical dream\' home like that with as many modern mod cons as possible.
                   thanks so much for the help,
                            Leprechaun63

Unfortunately my camera is up the creek right now but I will post some more as and when I get them..