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Author Topic: Building our house in the Philippines  (Read 103768 times)

Offline geno555

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Re: Building our house in the Philippines
« Reply #60 on: June 19, 2009, 12:15:50 AM »
 I tried to get you a patent Colin but Captain \"Bligh\" turn it down :(... i went up on the roof today, not a pretty site by any means!!

don\'t ask me how the men got me up there? if you remember that movie about them dropping a Thailand Elephant by parachute out of a c-130 well it looked something like that, except a lot worse!





The fire wall don\'t ask me why?



 

view of the mountain



I will always remember my \"roots\" the top of my neighbors piggery, right next to our fence but she has a hose and  water and they don\'t say a word except on slaughter day.



one of the 4 coconut trees I managed to save.


 
top floor with all the  re-bar bent down so I would fall



the men tying 20 mm re-bar together.



the other side of the mountain



the adjoining empty lot i wanted it for more room but not at 400,000P for 300 sq mfrs.





part of my side yard where my orchids are going to go



bottom right hand backside



Top of the roof looking east



Front Entrance




Digging ditch for where right hand firewall is going to go?

will try and get to the Fan I want to put in with a thermostat so it doesn\'t run all the time, had a hard time with explaining to the foreman who in fairness doesn\'t speak English, about how i wanted the roof overhand to come down on aluminum sofit with vents in it, but finally made it in Google Sketch up 7 and he understands.

will try to get more tomorrow and maybe a poem or two.

Murf






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Re: Building our house in the Philippines
« Reply #61 on: June 19, 2009, 08:07:16 AM »
Looks like a very savvy idea you have there Colin and quite an insulation factor without great cost or almost no cost!! Looks like your pulling everything together and starting to really get ready to break ground good for you. I wish you all the good fortune and luck in the efforts you house is certain a lot bigger than mine will every be , but I don\'t have the funds as you my old friend ;D ;D

I better not take away from your post and post some new pictures of my own  as I don\'t want to eat up your post time. Just thought I would drop you a line and say smart idea with the Styrofoam sandwich.

Maybe you ought to patent that baby. :D

the \"Murf\"



My original idea was to use hollow blocks then wrap 2\" Styrofoam and wire around the whole building to include the columns and beams. I was told that it would be expensive and not really justify the cost. I am very aware of the possible high building cost, so this is the first compromise I have decided to make. Another compromise could be the roofing material, metal instead of clay or concrete tiles.

Colin

Offline tom.inbigdtexas

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Re: Building our house in the Philippines
« Reply #62 on: June 19, 2009, 08:10:08 AM »
I prefer the full size Snooker table to the smaller Pool tables...

Stucco...  is the standard form of finish here. I would prefer gypsum plaster for the inside, but I have not seen that available. Maybe it is not suitable for the humid climate...

The square at the house end is an 8\' deep diving pit...

SNOOKER -- I\'m with you 100% Colin, there\'s nothing like playing on a 12x6 putting green.  I grew up in a one-horse town (pop. 4,000) in West Texas... my Dad was the town drywall/painter contractor (Philippine wages might have been a raise ;D)-- and he and my Mom managed the local bowling alley/pool hall for an out of town owner.  The owner had found 6 Snooker tables at a bargain price somewhere... so that was the only tables in town.  I started shooting Snooker when I was 10, and didn\'t even know any other tables existed until I was about 16.  I love shooting Snooker with a passion to this day.

WALL FINISH -- Virtually every residence or business interior wall in Dallas is gypsum (\"Sheetrock\").  Stucco is only found in really high-end homes.  Even then it is fake stucco, just thick plaster with a rough trowel finish.  If there is not a sheetrock manufacturer in the Philippines, I suspect its weight might make shipping it in cost prohibitive.  Also, you may be right... it might not hold up well in the high humidity.

SWIMMING POOL --  Please do me a favor and make the diving area at least 10 feet deep from water surface.  From 30 years of handling injury cases, I have seen dozens of very serious head and neck injuries (including quadriplegia) from dives into water less than 10 feet.  The risk from too little depth is increased if you install a spring board.

I look forward to some photos as construction gets underway.

Tom     
Dallas, Tx, USA
Mactan, Cebu, PH

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Re: Building our house in the Philippines
« Reply #63 on: June 19, 2009, 08:19:46 AM »
Murf, I don\'t understand about the firewall, what is it for and why do you need one? Perhaps someone else can explain.

That adjacent lot is certainly expensive, particularly in your area. The prices there should be similar to those here on Palawan and I would say that P200,000 would be the absolute maximum for a lot that size.

Colin

Offline geno555

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Re: Building our house in the Philippines
« Reply #64 on: June 19, 2009, 08:44:57 AM »
Murf, I don\'t understand about the firewall, what is it for and why do you need one? Perhaps someone else can explain.

That adjacent lot is certainly expensive, particularly in your area. The prices there should be similar to those here on Palawan and I would say that P200,000 would be the absolute maximum for a lot that size.

Colin

Colin, I after talking  to the guys found out it is just the outside wall but every outside wall for some reason is called a fire wall.

what i forget to mention was that same property in 2004 was 89,000 pesos, i started to buy it then but I had just bought 3 pieces in the government controlled area for my family which they neither one used and are still living with me. oh well. anyway when there was  a rumor that bayugan was going to become a city and the public land with all kind of houses on it on the other side of me was going to be bulldozed down for national highway one to run clear to Davao. well we got turned down, now the man ask me do i want the property for 100,000 but my house I have been in it it is way to big for even me and Jennifer,I don\'t need all that room.  he sons and daughters are really mad at me, but I can\'t help it. I have enough capital flow problems with this one, the gate I want and the ceiling fans are going to set me back more than i planned for.

Glad you are coming allong fine with yours,  I tried for a patent but as you see was shot down

:)

Murf

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Re: Building our house in the Philippines
« Reply #65 on: June 19, 2009, 08:55:13 AM »

SNOOKER -- I\'m with you 100% Colin, there\'s nothing like playing on a 12x6 putting green.  I grew up in a one-horse town (pop. 4,000) in West Texas... my Dad was the town drywall/painter contractor (Philippine wages might have been a raise ;D)-- and he and my Mom managed the local bowling alley/pool hall for an out of town owner.  The owner had found 6 Snooker tables at a bargain price somewhere... so that was the only tables in town.  I started shooting Snooker when I was 10, and didn\'t even know any other tables existed until I was about 16.  I love shooting Snooker with a passion to this day.

The Snooker table with definitely be a bonus addon at a later date. I believe a 12x6 is only available in Manila, and the cost and transport costs could be very high, I may have to settle for a smaller pool table.

Quote

WALL FINISH -- Virtually every residence or business interior wall in Dallas is gypsum (\"Sheetrock\").  Stucco is only found in really high-end homes.  Even then it is fake stucco, just thick plaster with a rough trowel finish.  If there is not a sheetrock manufacturer in the Philippines, I suspect its weight might make shipping it in cost prohibitive.  Also, you may be right... it might not hold up well in the high humidity.

I believe sheetrock is available here, but I doubt if many builders are experienced in using it. It is not wise to move too far away from the norm with very inexperienced labour.

Quote

SWIMMING POOL --  Please do me a favor and make the diving area at least 10 feet deep from water surface.  From 30 years of handling injury cases, I have seen dozens of very serious head and neck injuries (including quadriplegia) from dives into water less than 10 feet.  The risk from too little depth is increased if you install a spring board.

Noted, an extra 2\' should not be too much of a problem  ;D A springboard is a nice idea but I have not seen one on any of the pools here. Maybe something that could be added later.
 

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Re: Building our house in the Philippines
« Reply #66 on: June 19, 2009, 09:17:17 AM »

Colin, I after talking  to the guys found out it is just the outside wall but every outside wall for some reason is called a fire wall.

what i forget to mention was that same property in 2004 was 89,000 pesos, i started to buy it then but I had just bought 3 pieces in the government controlled area for my family which they neither one used and are still living with me. oh well. anyway when there was  a rumor that bayugan was going to become a city and the public land with all kind of houses on it on the other side of me was going to be bulldozed down for national highway one to run clear to Davao. well we got turned down, now the man ask me do i want the property for 100,000 but my house I have been in it it is way to big for even me and Jennifer,I don\'t need all that room.  he sons and daughters are really mad at me, but I can\'t help it. I have enough capital flow problems with this one, the gate I want and the ceiling fans are going to set me back more than i planned for.


Murf

There is no reason for them to be mad at you after they decided to become greedy and bump up the price. I had a similar thing with our second lot, but refused to pay the extra and got it at the original price. We got some funny looks from the owners wife when we met at the attorneys to transfer the title.  ;D

Colin

Offline tom.inbigdtexas

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Re: Building our house in the Philippines
« Reply #67 on: June 19, 2009, 01:35:50 PM »
Is anyone familiar with I.C.E. block building systems.  It is for constructing exterior walls.  It seems to have many benefits, but does not seem to have caught on here in the U.S.

It is basically a set of interlocking styrofoam blocks that create a form into which rebar is inserted and then concrete is poured.  Google it and there are several sites with illustrations.

The reason it is of interest to me is:

Very high insulation rating - R32
Withstands sustained winds of 160 mph
Termite resistant
Fire resistant     
High soundproof rating - STC48

Seems like some pretty good qualities for the Philippines. 

My concern is, since it is similar in cost to wood or cement block construction -- why isn\'t it more common?  I have only seen one house here in Dallas being built this way, in 2001.

Tom   
Dallas, Tx, USA
Mactan, Cebu, PH

Offline c_a_p_t_a_i_n_r_o_n

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Re: Building our house in the Philippines
« Reply #68 on: June 20, 2009, 05:26:47 PM »
Tom,

I looked at this briefly a couple of years ago http://www.iceblock.net/

But never took it any further, one because I\'ve seen how polystyrene can degrade and wondered what the integrity would be like 5-10 years down the road.

Now if they were using a closed cell foam rather than open cell polystyrene......I guess I\'d have more confidence
Closed cell foams would push up the price significantly......

I was looking for ease of consruction mostly

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Re: Building our house in the Philippines
« Reply #69 on: June 21, 2009, 05:31:54 PM »
Part 6

When we first spoke to our engineer about building the house he asked what our budget was. I said about P5M for the completed house, which I expected to be a little tight. He is now attempting to get the basic structure, foundations, columns, beams and roof, but no windows or finishing, for under P2M. I was expecting that to involve a few compromises, but I wanted to start high then perhaps shave off a few of the less important things. I asked him to check on the price of a high quality tile roof, but this proved to be expensive and we have decided on a good tile effect metal roof. He is uncertain about fitting ridge vents, but I think we can get that sorted.

I originally suggested fitting the cold water tank in the Crows Nest, but he said it would be cheaper and easier to just run the cold water supply direct to all the taps. I also wanted to have a central hot water system, but was told that was not what people do here in the Philippines; just have instant water heaters next to showers etc. My wife tended to agree with him, but I was not convinced, so have given it some more thought. My idea now is to mount a cold water storage tank on a tower near the Kitchen, Dirty Kitchen and Master bathroom, leave space on the platform for a solar hot water tank with the heating pipes zig- zaging down the tower. I can then feed both hot and cold water to the master bathroom and kitchen. I would then just feed a cold supply to the three bedrooms at the other end of the house and fit instant heaters if necessary. There is nothing like a good compromise  ;D

We are now waiting for him to come back with the first estimate for the structure and then we can sort out the details. The plan is to complete the basic structure to see how much money is left for the interior finishing. We could then leave some of the rooms unfinished, if necessary, rather than settle for lower quality products.

It has been agreed that all the power sockets will be 3 pin, to include an earth connection, I don’t want any more of the shocks you get from standard Philippine installations. I would also like to use the UK system of ring mains, but I expect to run up against some arguments against that. I want something better and safer than you get in most houses here in the Philippines.

I am also considering laying in some 12v wiring for emergency lighting to be connected later to a set of 12v batteries. These batteries would initially be charged with a standard 12v charger from the mains supply. This will give the option of eventually connecting solar panels to charge the batteries. Ultimately this could be expanded to allow the connection of inverters to supply TV’s Refrigerators etc.

Continued in part 7

Offline grizzi

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Re: Building our house in the Philippines
« Reply #70 on: June 21, 2009, 06:35:32 PM »
Quote
I am also considering laying in some 12v wiring for emergency lighting to be connected later to a set of 12v batteries. These batteries would initially be charged with a standard 12v charger from the mains supply. This will give the option of eventually connecting solar panels to charge the batteries. Ultimately this could be expanded to allow the connection of inverters to supply TV’s Refrigerators etc.

I thought of the same thing Colin. It would be simple to install 12v lighting in the bedrooms for emergency use, and a good solar \"trickle\" charger would keep the battery charged and ready for use.  I also looked at purchasing a camp refrigerator that can run on electricity or propane.  They come in various sizes, but would be a great back up for those long brown outs.  I\'m not sure of the costs, or if I can even find them in the PI.  Might just be better to buy a back-up 5.5kva Generator and automatic transfer switch for the house.  Good thought also on the electric...I hate those little electrical bites you get from poorly or non-grounded electrical systems in the Philippines... 8)
Greg & Almira  ;-)

Offline bowlofsopas

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Re: Building our house in the Philippines
« Reply #71 on: June 21, 2009, 06:53:32 PM »
I have no experience with this... which, I guess, is why I\'m asking this question: how does styrofoam/polystyrene, as a building material, react in a house fire? No special qualities regarding its fumes?

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Re: Building our house in the Philippines
« Reply #72 on: June 21, 2009, 07:57:53 PM »
Quote
I am also considering laying in some 12v wiring for emergency lighting to be connected later to a set of 12v batteries. These batteries would initially be charged with a standard 12v charger from the mains supply. This will give the option of eventually connecting solar panels to charge the batteries. Ultimately this could be expanded to allow the connection of inverters to supply TV’s Refrigerators etc.

I thought of the same thing Colin. It would be simple to install 12v lighting in the bedrooms for emergency use, and a good solar \"trickle\" charger would keep the battery charged and ready for use.  I also looked at purchasing a camp refrigerator that can run on electricity or propane.  They come in various sizes, but would be a great back up for those long brown outs.  I\'m not sure of the costs, or if I can even find them in the PI.  Might just be better to buy a back-up 5.5kva Generator and automatic transfer switch for the house.  Good thought also on the electric...I hate those little electrical bites you get from poorly or non-grounded electrical systems in the Philippines... 8)

You can also buy 12v fans designed for use in vehicles, not very powerful but could be useful.

The brownouts here rarely exceed two hours, so we don\'t have much of a problem with the refrigerator providing we refrain from opening the door.

Colin

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Re: Building our house in the Philippines
« Reply #73 on: June 21, 2009, 08:01:20 PM »
I have no experience with this... which, I guess, is why I\'m asking this question: how does styrofoam/polystyrene, as a building material, react in a house fire? No special qualities regarding its fumes?

I believe there can be a problem with Styrofoam in a fire, but in my case it is encased in about 1\" of cement so should be OK.

Colin

Offline c_a_p_t_a_i_n_r_o_n

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Re: Building our house in the Philippines
« Reply #74 on: June 21, 2009, 09:34:27 PM »
I have no experience with this... which, I guess, is why I\'m asking this question: how does styrofoam/polystyrene, as a building material, react in a house fire? No special qualities regarding its fumes?

from wikipedia

Health and fire hazards

There is concern about the trace presence of polystyrene\'s production chemicals in the final plastic product, most of which are toxic if not removed. For instance benzene, which is used to produce ethylbenzene for styrene, is a known carcinogen. As well, unpolymerized styrene may pose health risks. Nevertheless, the EPA states:

Styrene is primarily used in the production of polystyrene plastics and resins. Acute (short-term) exposure to styrene in humans results in mucous membrane and eye irritation, and gastrointestinal effects. Chronic (long-term) exposure to styrene in humans results in effects on the central nervous system (CNS), such as headache, fatigue, weakness, and depression, CNS dysfunction, hearing loss, and peripheral neuropathy. Human studies are inconclusive on the reproductive and developmental effects of styrene; several studies did not report an increase in developmental effects in women who worked in the plastics industry, while an increased frequency of spontaneous abortions and decreased frequency of births were reported in another study. Several epidemiologic studies suggest there may be an association between styrene exposure and an increased risk of leukemia and lymphoma. However, the evidence is inconclusive due to confounding factors. EPA has not given a formal carcinogen classification to styrene. [19]    ”

Polystyrene is classified according to DIN4102 as a \"B3\" product, meaning highly flammable or \"easily ignited.\" Consequently, although it is an efficient insulator at low temperatures, its use is prohibited in any exposed installations in building construction if the material is not flame retardant, e.g., with hexabromocyclododecane. It must be concealed behind drywall, sheet metal or concrete. Foamed polystyrene plastic materials have been accidentally ignited and caused huge fires and losses, for example at the Düsseldorf International Airport, the Channel tunnel (where polystyrene was inside a railcar that caught on fire), and the Browns Ferry Nuclear Power Plant (where fire reached through a fire retardant and reached the foamed plastic underneath, inside a firestop that had not been tested and certified in accordance with the final installation).

In addition to fire hazard, polystyrene can be dissolved by substances that contain acetone (such as most aerosol paint sprays), and by cyanoacrylate glues.