Author Topic: \"skimming\" interior walls  (Read 5277 times)

Offline fred

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Re: \"skimming\" interior walls
« Reply #15 on: December 11, 2009, 10:57:58 AM »
Dont forget that there are no Gypsum deposits here and so no sacks of Gypsum plaster that I have seen..
Our mason puts a rough coat of sand/cement over the CHB`s and skims the walls with a thin coat of pure cement..
Really smooth finish and far harder wearing than Gypsum plaster!!
The Chemicals in the dry cement will have to be neutralized before painting though.

Offline chuwachi

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Re: \"skimming\" interior walls
« Reply #16 on: December 13, 2009, 03:51:54 PM »
Hi Fred,

That\'s pretty much what our guy did, but for some reason he only did it on the exterior, possibly they\'re concerned with damp proofing the place as it does tend to rain a wee bit in Baguio!
Where do they get the Gypsum board from in RP? I\'ve seen it around a little when I last visited. Had the idea that we may use it as the deviding walls for the upper two floors of the house. Then at least if we change our minds with the layout or rental options we can change it around far easier and cheaper.

Offline fred

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Re: \"skimming\" interior walls
« Reply #17 on: December 13, 2009, 05:26:28 PM »
Not sure where they get it from??? No problem getting it here at our hardware though..
Why not just tape and joint the seams..Then paint??

Offline coutts00

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Re: \"skimming\" interior walls
« Reply #18 on: December 13, 2009, 07:59:39 PM »
Something about interior mold from humidity, gypsum absorbs the moisture and swells.
Wayne† ;D ;D

Offline chuwachi

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Re: \"skimming\" interior walls
« Reply #19 on: December 14, 2009, 06:11:56 PM »
Sorry Fred maybe I should re-phrase my question prompted from the information you posted: Where does the Gypsum come from to make plasterboard if it\'s not a natural resource in RP, or is the board imported from overseas?

I think you\'re probably correct about the moisture Wayne, as it does get fairly dank in Baguio at times.

Maybe We\'ll go for a more open plan with the upper floors, Ozzie style perhaps with less interior walls, hmm.....

Offline fred

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Re: \"skimming\" interior walls
« Reply #20 on: December 14, 2009, 07:51:14 PM »
I was told once that it was imported but never really did any further research...
Im guessing Australia though..
Most malls use it for their ceilings and interior partition† walls and many of the enclosed Karaoke joints use it for the interior part of the stud wall..
 I saw a truck load being delivered to a German thats building his house in Panglao this Saturday.†
Our hardware always have 5/6 pallets full of the stuff so Im guessing there must be more general demand...No problem getting reinforced jointing tape either...Its everywhere.

Offline fred

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Re: \"skimming\" interior walls
« Reply #21 on: December 14, 2009, 07:56:51 PM »
Something about interior mold from humidity, gypsum absorbs the moisture and swells.

If sealed and painted with† paints that contain anti mold agents then the humidity will probably not touch it.. Gypsum board really needs to get very very wet before it swells..
Just my advice as an ex professional decorator that had to soak the stuff before removing old wall paper for years on end.
Your mileage may vary though!!

Offline chuwachi

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Re: \"skimming\" interior walls
« Reply #22 on: December 14, 2009, 08:52:42 PM »
Probably it would work if it were treated correctly and I recall that you could buy the green stuff in the UK that was for use in bathrooms and areas that were likely to get splashed.
I\'ve sealed and painted plasterboard here in Oz and I wall papered it in the UK, but I never had a go at removing wall paper off plasterboard. I guess it\'s similar to removing it off a plastered surface by soaking, although it took me a while to work out it\'s far easier and quicker to use a steamer. Does a steamer work on plasterboard too or is it a little harsh?

I would prefer to make our upper floor walls with plasterboard if possible, so if anyone knows if it\'s a goer in Baguio......