Philippines Insider" The Ultimate Philippines Travel Guide for Tourists and Expats

Author Topic: Books  (Read 7966 times)

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Re: Books
« Reply #15 on: June 14, 2010, 09:23:07 PM »

A4 paper is hard to find here, I stock up at the big stationers in Manila when I visit. You will have to adapt to the US letter size for most things. Unfortunately the usual stuff available is very thin poor quality, but it is cheap.

Colin
I\'m pretty sure I did eventually buy a pack of \'American Legal\' size, about 2\" longer than rest-of-world normal paper. ???

In fact I found I still had a 1/2\" pile of the stuff in an old drawer, when we packed for our container last month, which means it has lasted us nearly ten years......

Now you mention it, I meant to add a couple reams of decent printer paper to our \'essentials to take\' list. :(

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Re: Books
« Reply #16 on: June 15, 2010, 06:55:37 AM »

I\'m pretty sure I did eventually buy a pack of \'American Legal\' size, about 2\" longer than rest-of-world normal paper. ???

In fact I found I still had a 1/2\" pile of the stuff in an old drawer, when we packed for our container last month, which means it has lasted us nearly ten years......

Now you mention it, I meant to add a couple reams of decent printer paper to our \'essentials to take\' list. :(

They do use US legal size paper here for most legal documents (surprise!). The problem with it is that it is too long to be scanned on a standard home scanner and it also does not fit comfortably with standard A4/letter size. I don\'t understand the reason for it, perhaps someone can explain.

Colin

Offline Gray Wolf

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Re: Books
« Reply #17 on: June 15, 2010, 07:52:24 AM »

I\'m pretty sure I did eventually buy a pack of \'American Legal\' size, about 2\" longer than rest-of-world normal paper. ???

In fact I found I still had a 1/2\" pile of the stuff in an old drawer, when we packed for our container last month, which means it has lasted us nearly ten years......

Now you mention it, I meant to add a couple reams of decent printer paper to our \'essentials to take\' list. :(


They do use US legal size paper here for most legal documents (surprise!). The problem with it is that it is too long to be scanned on a standard home scanner and it also does not fit comfortably with standard A4/letter size. I don\'t understand the reason for it, perhaps someone can explain.

Colin


The difference is American standard size versus ISO size.   In the US we use inches and feet as standards of measurement whereas in Europe the sizes are metric.  A4 (210 mm x 297 mm), the standard in most countries outside North America, is not quite as wide as Letter size (approx. 216 mm x 279 mm) paper and is longer.  Since the Philippines has more of a connection with the US, you\'ll most likely find American standard size paper vs UK metric.  

That\'s my story and I\'m sticking to it...     ;D  ;D

For a better understanding of common paper sizes used by other countries, EDS, Inc. provides a Guide to International Paper Sizes with a comprehensive set of tables, comparisons, and conversion tips.

http://tinyurl.com/2csvddy

Hope this helps!   :)
Louisville, KY USA - Bagong Silang, Caloocan City, PH

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Re: Books
« Reply #18 on: June 15, 2010, 03:00:33 PM »

The difference is American standard size versus ISO size.   In the US we use inches and feet as standards of measurement whereas in Europe the sizes are metric.  A4 (210 mm x 297 mm), the standard in most countries outside North America, is not quite as wide as Letter size (approx. 216 mm x 279 mm) paper and is longer.  Since the Philippines has more of a connection with the US, you\'ll most likely find American standard size paper vs UK metric.  

That\'s my story and I\'m sticking to it...     ;D  ;D

For a better understanding of common paper sizes used by other countries, EDS, Inc. provides a Guide to International Paper Sizes with a comprehensive set of tables, comparisons, and conversion tips.

http://tinyurl.com/2csvddy

Hope this helps!   :)


It is interesting to note that the Philippines has officially adopted the ISO standard so, despite the US dominance, A4 should be more readily available. Wikipedia also has an interesting article about the history of paper sizes.

Colin

Offline JoyfullyJanet

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Education in the Philippines
« Reply #19 on: June 20, 2010, 08:32:48 AM »
Greetings!

This is my first post, as it\'s been my first opportunity to read through a thread since I\'ve joined the forum.

I have never visited the Philippines. It had been the duty station that I dreamed for my husband (ex) to get before he retired. His ships frequented the islands, but that didn\'t get me any closer than Guam.

Now 20 years after being stationed in Guam, I\'m revisiting that dream.

This is a dream and an adventure that I look forward to achieving before my 51st birthday (my 50th is 07/24) my family thinks I\'m out of my mind. While I\'m thinking that they\'re cuckoos for NOT giving it a serious thought. I wouldn\'t care, except that THEY are included in this dream of mine.

Bellingham, Washington is the most scenic place I\'ve ever been, and I love the moderate climate. But it\'s already 3000 miles away from the people that I love the most in this world, and if I could afford to entice them to move to Washington, I would. However, I don\'t need to tell any of you, how much money it would take to live the expat lifestyle anywhere in the US!

My oldest grandson is 5 years old, with a 4 month/old sister. And the explanation of the classroom, and the photos! It IS more than just the book learning, it\'s also about learning what being respectful is. I definitely don\'t want the kids to be submissive; which my son-in-law believes can only be achieved by beatings (he\'d NEVER beat a child), and if you see a child who behaves respectfully, it was because the parents were harsh and strict. This has been his personal observation, and I can\'t get him to see beyond that.

I admit, my parenting skills towards my only child weren\'t perfect. However, I believe that I should have been more strict and more harsh, in retrospect. I wish my son-in-law wouldn\'t overcompensate and give his 5y/o son so much leniency, ultimately allowing disrespectful behavior. Don\'t get me wrong, compared to a lot of the kids in Long Island, NY, where they live, he is a very well behaved little boy. Over the last year, he\'s been going to preschool and picking up some really bad behavior, which his father believes is an expression of childhood frustration.

I have no interest in arguing with my son-in-law. I love him dearly, he\'s a wonderful father and husband.

The questions I\'m leading up to are - Relating to grade/intermediate schools.
  • Is there corporal punishment in the grade school classes?  
  • What type of interaction/input is there between the schools and parents?
  • What areas of the Philippines are considered to have the best grade schools?
  • Are the quality of the schools based on the how affluent the neighborhood that it\'s in?
  • Where would I find out about SAT scores for students transferring to the United States?
  • Where could I find information on the various private schools available?

I\'m sure that I could come up with a dozen more questions.

Thank you for all of your insight and shared experiences.

You are JOY!
Joyfully,
Janet

Offline RUFUS

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Re: Books
« Reply #20 on: June 20, 2010, 10:03:48 AM »
Janet
Hi howdy, welcome to the forum...
I\'m a little confused about your post.
You say \"they are included in this dream\"...so I guessing you are wanting \"them\" to move to the Philippines with you(also by your school questions)???
Or is this just a visit?
If you can\'t get them to move to Bellingham with you... How are you going to get them to move to the Philippines???
Moving there poses a whole different set of answers and logistics than just a visit.
The forum members can give you better answers than I, but I think they also will need to know more of what your long or short term goals are.
Do not let anybody\'s nay-saying or thinking your nuts influence your decision to AT LEAST visit the Philippines, and if you wanna move there that is also your choice.
SO SAYETH THE RUFUS

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Re: Education in the Philippines
« Reply #21 on: June 21, 2010, 02:03:36 AM »
Greetings!

This is my first post, as it\'s been my first opportunity to read through a thread since I\'ve joined the forum.

I have never visited the Philippines. It had been the duty station that I dreamed for my husband (ex) to get before he retired. His ships frequented the islands, but that didn\'t get me any closer than Guam.

Now 20 years after being stationed in Guam, I\'m revisiting that dream.................

.............Thank you for all of your insight and shared experiences.

You are JOY!
Joyfully,
Janet
Hi Janet, welcome to the forum.

Your post also confused me a little too. I\'d respectfully suggest visiting the Philippines before you make any plans to move permanently there, or take children there for their education.

You have painted yourself a picture of an idealistic Asian paradise, which, unfortunately, the Philippines is not. It is riddled with poverty and laced with corruption, and the main reason most people go there is because it is cheap and warm.

But there are a few of us who know another side of the Philippines, and you won\'t discover that side until you have spent some time \'in country\'.

It is not for everybody, but you\'ll not know that until you have been there. Go. Go there now. ;)