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Author Topic: Electrical recepticles and water hose connections  (Read 5690 times)

Offline bnelson

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Electrical recepticles and water hose connections
« on: June 20, 2010, 06:40:01 AM »
HI All.† I know that the receptacles in the Philippines can take a regular U.S. 2-prong plug, but do are they equipped to take a 3-prong grounded plug????
† Also, are the outside hose threaded connections metric, or can you connect a standard 5/8\" garden hose?† I am currently amassing things that I think I might need to ship, and am going crazy thinking about everything.† Thanks for any help...

Offline RUFUS

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Re: Electrical recepticles and water hose connections
« Reply #1 on: June 20, 2010, 06:58:48 AM »
Welcome to the forum...
The power outlets are the standard 2 prong type and are 220V, so if you are bringing things from home, make sure the input voltages are able to accept that.
Bring a bunch of those little 2 to 3 prong adapters. Some places may have the 3 prong receptacles, but most likely not.
Can\'t speak for the entire country, but the house I stayed at had regular hose connections on the outside spigot.
SO SAYETH THE RUFUS

Offline bnelson

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Re: Electrical recepticles and water hose connections
« Reply #2 on: June 20, 2010, 07:37:04 AM »
Thanks for the welcome and the reply.†  Buying the 3 to 2 prong adapters is a brilliant idea.

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Re: Electrical recepticles and water hose connections
« Reply #3 on: June 20, 2010, 07:52:14 AM »
The adapters are readily available in most large hardware stores here. There are also universal types that will take any plug, but not so easily found. It is also easy to find transformers to step the 220v down to 110v.

In my experience most outside water connection are just standard taps. You have to push on a hose and maybe use a jubilee clip. Some of the stores will also carry a range of the \'clip lock\' type of hose connectors with a range of car cleaning brushes etc.

Colin

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Re: Electrical recepticles and water hose connections
« Reply #4 on: June 21, 2010, 12:03:36 AM »
If you move to anywhere that was near an old US base, you might be lucky to find your house wired for both 115 and 220 volts. Our new rental place in Timog apparently is, and the last house there ten years ago was also dual wired. I don\'t recall ever using it, as we had nothing but 220v gear, but the system was in place.

Offline graham

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Re: Electrical recepticles and water hose connections
« Reply #5 on: June 21, 2010, 10:49:32 AM »
I\'ll extend my welcome as well.

Garden hose fittings. The garden taps available here on Mindanao are the standard 1/2 and 3/4 BSP threads with the 1/2\" being the most prevalent.

If you wish to change your wall mounted power outlets from 2 prong to 3 then these outlets are also readily available. I have had my house fitted with all universal 3 pin outlets that take a veriety of 2 and 3 pin plugs.

BUT unless you are prepared to also fit an earthing wire to the power side then just stick with what Colin has suggested, adapters!

Graham†

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Re: Electrical recepticles and water hose connections
« Reply #6 on: June 21, 2010, 08:43:41 PM »

BUT unless you are prepared to also fit an earthing wire to the power side then just stick with what Colin has suggested, adapters!

Graham†
In Marquee Mall in Angeles I saw an extension lead/adaptor with with a Philippines three pronger plug on, and a four or five block UK plug at the other end. Perfect for connecting the TV/Xbox/cable tuner/Wii/VDO player machine up to.† ;D


 
Things have definitly come a long way in the last decade. I remember when you could buy a Philippines plug and a socket, in the same hardware store, and the plug would simply fall out of the socket if you tilted it over..... Totally rubbish quality control, manufacturing and design.

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Re: Electrical recepticles and water hose connections
« Reply #7 on: June 21, 2010, 09:47:26 PM »
In Marquee Mall in Angeles I saw an extension lead/adaptor with with a Philippines three pronger plug on, and a four or five block UK plug at the other end. Perfect for connecting the TV/Xbox/cable tuner/Wii/VDO player machine up to.† ;D

Bing bought a very nice extension lead in Manila. It has a Philippine three pin plug on one end but with the earth pin removed, and a block of four universal sockets on the other end each with switches and LEDs. There is a thread where the earth pin was removed, so I guess someone unscrewed it to make it fit in a standard two pin socket.

Colin

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Re: Electrical recepticles and water hose connections
« Reply #8 on: June 21, 2010, 10:42:15 PM »
Bing bought a very nice extension lead in Manila. It has a Philippine three pin plug on one end but with the earth pin removed, and a block of four universal sockets on the other end each with switches and LEDs. There is a thread where the earth pin was removed, so I guess someone unscrewed it to make it fit in a standard two pin socket.

Colin
It is good to know that there are such useful things around nowadays.

When I finally get myself a workshop set-up at our new place it will have all UK sockets and plugs in. All my grinders, drills, saws and such had them on, so it makes sense. I even threw any spare UK sockets and plugs I could find into the container before it left.

 Just need to make sure that earth connection is carried through the whole system, not left out at some point on its travel to ground.

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Re: Electrical recepticles and water hose connections
« Reply #9 on: June 22, 2010, 07:37:00 AM »
The universal sockets take UK, Australian, US two and three pin, two pin round, and others I don\'t recognise. I plan to fit these in the kitchen, hobby room, study, and one each in most other rooms. The rest will be three pin Philippine/US type. I would also like to go for UK style ring mains, but I may compromise on that.

Colin

Offline graham

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Re: Electrical recepticles and water hose connections
« Reply #10 on: June 22, 2010, 04:52:43 PM »
King, Colin,

Just to inform you that Earth Leakage Devices (ELD) are available here. When I had the house rewired I had my guy fit one. I know it worked because I, unknowingly, when fitting a 3 pin plug to the wiring of my water heater, removed too much insulation from the earth wire, which contacted a live wire when I re-assembled the plug.† :o

 Couldn\'t work out for a while why the dashed ELD kept shutting down.† ???

Cost me around Php1.2K cheap protection!

Graham† †

Offline Knowdafish

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Re: Electrical recepticles and water hose connections
« Reply #11 on: June 22, 2010, 05:08:54 PM »
I learned something new today!† ;D

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Re: Electrical recepticles and water hose connections
« Reply #12 on: June 22, 2010, 08:41:17 PM »
King, Colin,

Just to inform you that Earth Leakage Devices (ELD) are available here. When I had the house rewired I had my guy fit one. I know it worked because I, unknowingly, when fitting a 3 pin plug to the wiring of my water heater, removed too much insulation from the earth wire, which contacted a live wire when I re-assembled the plug.† :o

 Couldn\'t work out for a while why the dashed ELD kept shutting down.† ???

Cost me around Php1.2K cheap protection!

Graham† †
Thanks for the info. I was wondering whether they could be used, or were even avaliable. We call them RCB\'s in the UK, \'Residual Current Breakers\'. I shall see about installing them in our place, especially in my workshop. (carport :()

The last house we had over there had some horrendous electrical hot water heater, that installed over the end of the shower nozzle, and was plugged into the wall socket. A recipe for disaster if ever there was one!

I could see it sparking internally, if tapped or moved when turned on. It went straight in the garbage bin!† :o

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Re: Electrical recepticles and water hose connections
« Reply #13 on: June 23, 2010, 01:01:47 PM »
QUOTE:\"The last house we had over there had some horrendous electrical hot water heater, that installed over the end of the shower nozzle, and was plugged into the wall socket\"

That guy is the old EU hot shower system and in some area still used today. How hot the water depends on the flow of the water, no other regulating..†

Many many years ago, (early 80\'s), I installed one of those for a Missionary friend in the deep jungle of Peru were the camp, (Wycliff), had it\'s own power and a waterfall.
B-Ray

King, Colin,

Just to inform you that Earth Leakage Devices (ELD) are available here. When I had the house rewired I had my guy fit one. I know it worked because I, unknowingly, when fitting a 3 pin plug to the wiring of my water heater, removed too much insulation from the earth wire, which contacted a live wire when I re-assembled the plug.† :o

 Couldn\'t work out for a while why the dashed ELD kept shutting down.† ???

Cost me around Php1.2K cheap protection!

Graham† †
Thanks for the info. I was wondering whether they could be used, or were even avaliable. We call them RCB\'s in the UK, \'Residual Current Breakers\'. I shall see about installing them in our place, especially in my workshop. (carport :()

The last house we had over there had some horrendous electrical hot water heater, that installed over the end of the shower nozzle, and was plugged into the wall socket. A recipe for disaster if ever there was one!

I could see it sparking internally, if tapped or moved when turned on. It went straight in the garbage bin!† :o

Offline graham

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Re: Electrical recepticles and water hose connections
« Reply #14 on: June 23, 2010, 09:35:56 PM »
B-Ray,

Don\'t know if I had the same in Papua New Guinea. It was about 7\" round and about 8-9\" long. it had an electrical coil inside and was screwed into the water outlet, so it was hanging down in a vertical position. An on/off switch was installed on the ceiling with a thin rope hanging down so that when in the shower you tugged on the rope to activate the electricity and the water heated up governed by the flow.

Is that the sort of thing your posting about??

Graham