Author Topic: Dome housing.  (Read 17373 times)

Offline coutts00

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Dome housing.
« on: March 02, 2008, 04:32:03 PM »
The \"Domes for the World\" organization rebuilt an entire village in Bandh Ache, after the Tsunami (forgive the spelling). The village or in our case the Provincial or Municipal Government grants the land and takes care of the titles issue. You could do a subdivision type of construction with a community hall in a dome as well, for the mandatory church services.

I had done some calculations on 2 hectares of about 100 domes, not a lot of space was allocated for land per dome, but as I have noticed most homes here, especially in poorer areas occupy the entire block of land anyway, and this included small roads for motorcycles and tricycles. A couple of possible options here would be to donate the entire construction when finished, lease out the domes at affordable rates, sell 10 yr leases on the domes and maintain the property as one unit or some type of sales and leasing combination. Rather than having dedicated septics for each dome, a community sewage type of system, with a large septic under say a community area allocated for every 25 homes. This could be a grassed area set aside for play, with the septic five or six feet under the grass and still accessible.

Depending on how it is set up, it could be handed over to the municipal government for maintenance or at the barangay level, with 100 homes it could almost be its own barangay or village. My calculations which have become very detailed, project a basic home could be built for 50kp a slightly larger one , with a second floor for about 75k and a very large one for 150k.

With traditional construction here, you could spend 150 - 200k for a modest small 40 sq mtr home, we can do a 31 sq/mtr home for 50k, and with a second floor and 62 sq/mtr for about 75K this includes plumbing, electrical and toilet fixtures, and the mandatory kitchen sink. An optional dirty kitchen could be attached to the rear of the building. My mother in laws ramshackle hut in Catanduanes is about 25 sq mtrs and has 8 people living in it.

The key to the domes is the lattice work of rebar, and the finished concrete is only 4 - 5 inches thick, thicker at the base and thinner at the top, it will withstand 350 - 400kph winds without issue. Hell when finished an average dome of this size weighs I think it was 27 tonne.

Wayne

Wayne  ;D ;D

Offline michael16136

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Re: Dome Housing
« Reply #1 on: March 03, 2008, 03:24:53 PM »
I think this is a great concept. However, it would worry me that the barangay captains/municipal mayors would immediately either allocate the dwellings to everyone in their families first, or would find a way to sell the entire thing for personal gain. I\'ve seen it happen, albeit on a much small scale, with some of the construction works that we build in various communities all over Mindanao. You would, I think, need some sort of enforceable agreement a priori, about how the houses would be allocated, and the rights of tenure. Outright gifts would probably not work as many of the recipients would sell the homes immediately for whatever cash they could take from the deal.

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Re: Dome Housing
« Reply #2 on: March 03, 2008, 07:17:12 PM »
Is there a liveability issue in the RP climate? They look as if they would be hellishly hot with little ventilation.

Offline fred

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Re: Dome Housing
« Reply #3 on: March 03, 2008, 09:47:36 PM »
Is there a liveability issue in the RP climate? They look as if they would be hellishly hot with little ventilation.

I was thinking the same..
Unless there is some pretty high factor insulation inside or the unit is built under a huge tree it will get rather warm in there to say the least..Just painting them white isn`t going to be enough,especially in March.

Offline coutts00

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Re: Dome Housing
« Reply #4 on: March 03, 2008, 10:18:50 PM »
Actually if you think about your standard method of construction here, they use a GI Sheet roof, now if you want to talk hot that is hot, as for the unit itself getting hot, remember the dome is half spherical, so if its 5 mtrs across it 2.5 mtrs or about 8ft high at its highest point, if a ventilation vane or vent is placed in the apex of the roof hot air escapes out through convection, as the hot air goes out it draws cooler air in to replace it.

Now for added insulation there is a product called vermiculite which is entrained into the concrete as it is made, and the old Filipino standby of placing a Nipa roof, or some type of pina shingles on a basic frame will alleviete another 50% of the heat, another option is to drop the ground floor 5 ft into the earth and use the surrounding earth as insulation, many options to cool the dome.

The amount of windows and the size of the windows is only limited by the fact that 1/2 of the total surface area of the dome has to be reinforced concrete. You could have 4 very large windows in the dome and the ventilation in the roof and a decent sized door, ventilation from any direction and heat leaving through the roof will keep it cool.

The domes built in the US are built to a different standard, include the required R factor insulation and use sprayed on Urethane foam for the insulation, but instead of a 50,000p dome that is livable here, we are talking just spending 3 times that amount on the insulation in the US. We are not building the Taj Mahal, just somewhere safe to live that will still be there 100 yrs from now and something they can leave to their kids.
Wayne  ;D ;D

Offline Beatle

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Re: Dome Housing
« Reply #5 on: March 04, 2008, 07:47:25 AM »

    Fred and Ken,
                          I can see why you may think that the domes would be hot but if painted white it should reflect the majority of the heat no matter how hot it gets, The next time you walk by a white car place your hand on the hood and no matter how hot the outside temperature, you will be able to place your hand on that car with out getting burned, but!!! place your hand on a car of any other color and you will get burned, So I would assume the same law would be in effect for the domes and the heat would be reflected and not absorbed.

                                                                              Ray Buhr
If you treat a servant like a servant, you will lead a alone. But if you treat a servant like a leader, multitudes will follow.  Beatle

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Re: Dome Housing
« Reply #6 on: March 04, 2008, 11:08:55 AM »


    Fred and Ken,
                          I can see why you may think that the domes would be hot but if painted white it should reflect the majority of the heat no matter how hot it gets, The next time you walk by a white car place your hand on the hood and no matter how hot the outside temperature, you will be able to place your hand on that car with out getting burned, but!!! place your hand on a car of any other color and you will get burned, So I would assume the same law would be in effect for the domes and the heat would be reflected and not absorbed.

                                                                              Ray Buhr

Another point to remember is that a dome, or hemisphere, has less surface area than any other shape, and therefore less to absorb heat.

Colin

Offline coutts00

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Re: Dome Housing
« Reply #7 on: March 04, 2008, 11:31:08 AM »
Btw, we also paint the domes using an elastomeric paint, typically white but could be any pale color, pale blue, pale yellow, pale green etc. The elastomeric paint is good for 10 yrs and expands and contracts at a similar rate to the concrete, giving it weatherproof protection and reducing the amount of water that seeps into the concrete during a rainy season. There are also waterproofing agents we can add to the mix during construction to increase the repellent properties of the concrete.

Once I rebuild my nest egg, I am planning on putting one up here in Rizal, larger than any stated here, about 20 mtrs diameter and 7 mtrs high it will be an ellipsoid dome not spherical. In the ellipsoid dome the walls are almost vertical giving a more normal living space, and the dome shape is very shallow. Depending on the depth of the water table where we build, it will also have a submerged stem wall going down about 5 meters, giving a basement living area where the den, my office and master bedroom will be located. Along with the mandatory living area, this will use the stored energy method of keeping the lower portion of the house cooled by the surrounding earth and require only fans to move the air and not an air conditioner.

One of the nice things about the dome is it does not require load bearing walls anywhere, as the roof weight is completely supported by the exterior walls, so you can have very open living areas with minimal walls allowing air to flow without restrictions and depending upon the size of your dome the 2nd or 3rd floors can also be supported by the  exterior walls.

But the idea here is to keep it small and cheap,  no more than sat a 8 mtr diameter, here is a classic floor plan you could do.



Relatively simple design after the airform is deflated, lumber and plywood walls would be constructed, in one day, same with any kitchen areas, a layer of stucco to the inside and the house is done and move onto the next one. One of the fundamental ideas here is to leave the interior of the dome as spacious as possible and therefore as functional as possible, the only walled off area is for the CR and Shower which are integrated into one and the kitchen area having a tap, sink and some counter space. Everything else is the responsibility of the occupant, where they will sleep etc, is up to them, we are essentially creating a basic dwelling shell with a finished concrete floor, i.e. four walls, a roof, a floor and a lockable front door. The customizing is up to the individual residents.

Wayne
Wayne  ;D ;D

Offline steveinvisayas

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Re: Dome Housing
« Reply #8 on: March 04, 2008, 01:17:12 PM »
Everything looks good from cost and design viewpoints. How would the interiors get designed and built? Would the dome builder help in this? (design)

Also on the exterior, from the standpoint of esthetics, neighborhood acceptance factor, etc how would you build a nipa shell around the dome? I think it would look cool!  ;)

According to the company website these shelters are designed to do best in warm to hot climates . Not sure if that means they keep the heat out very well or not. Waterproofing essential in the wetter areas (like where I\'m going, Bukidnon).

Love to see the big dome you have in mind! I think seeing one of these built already would be very impressive.
Steve Crawford
Damilag, Bukidnon

Offline coutts00

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Re: Dome Housing
« Reply #9 on: March 04, 2008, 02:17:36 PM »
Steve, as for the Nipa it might look like this on a smaller scale, obviously this is a much larger building than what I had thought we could do for low income housing.



There is a company in India that is doing Business Process Outsourcing and also programming, they are building a campus of these type of buildings, they included the vermiculite for the insulation and they look very cool and we integrated into the landscape.



Here is the link:

http://www.catalytic.in/#

http://static.monolithic.com/domenews/2001sum/india.html

These guys in India are putting up 4000 domes...



As for the finishing of the interiors it depends entirely upon the owner of the dome, if we did a micro financed venture and funded homes instead of businesses, or home based businesses, over a 5 or 10 yr period. We could offer an empty dome to some with only taps and drainage and a CR on the floor and they could build it as they had the money, or for those with a little extra, we could build out the inside using one of say 10 standard floor plans that would allow small modifications to each plan. And we would assist the owner to finish his work with additional workmen as required to do the work. None of the buildings is planned to take any longer than 12 days to finish, some in 5 and others longer.

The optimum here is 7 days for the exterior deflate the airform and move it to another location to start another house, with one airform you could build 52 shells a yr, 2 airforms 52 in 26 weeks. 3 comes down to 17 weeks, 4 comes down to 3 months and 5, in 10 weeks etc, assuming we could get someone like habitat for humanity behind this with some of their work force and know how and contacts with LGU\'s and 10 airforms, we would be cranking out 50 homes every 6 weeks, even HFH cannot achieve those results.

Wayne  ;D ;D

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Re: Dome Housing
« Reply #10 on: March 04, 2008, 02:33:14 PM »
Too late guys we already did it on Bohol...




Offline coutts00

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Re: Dome Housing
« Reply #11 on: March 04, 2008, 03:18:26 PM »
The following text is borrowed straight from a Monolithic brochure:

\"EcoShells
The name “Ecoshell” means “Economical, Eco-Friendly, Thin-Shell Concrete Dome.” This building is constructed with two inches of concrete and a modest amount of rebar.
As with the Monolithic Dome, EcoShells use less than 50% of concrete and rebar when compared to a conventional, rectangular building of the same square footage. In addition, the compound curve of the dome makes it stronger than virtually any other structure. They also takes less money and time to construct.
EcoShells are constructed of readily available and environment friendly materials. Trees and other local natural resources are conserved. Construction can be done by hiring local labor with very little special skills and/or equipment. The Airforms used to form the homes are re-usable. Up to 100 domes can be built from one $3,000 Airform.
An Ecoshell is as disaster proof as a building can get. It will withstand tornadoes, earthquakes, hurricanes, and fire. It cannot be burned, eaten by bugs or destroyed by mold. It will last for centuries. And because of the concrete’s thermal mass, interior temperatures remain stable.\"

http://static.monolithic.com/gallery/nonprofit/dftw/DFTW-Brochure-smaller.pdf

And this is straight from the Habitat for Humanity web site for the Philippines:


http://www.habitat.org.ph/how_habitat_works.php

How Habitat Works
      
     The Habitat Way: Sustainable, Empowering, Dignifying    
      
 
     

How Habitat Transforms Lives
Habitat for Humanity builds and rehabilitates simple, decent houses with the help of homeowners (known as \"homepartner\") families, volunteer labor, and donations of money and materials.Building Homes: Our Core Competency

Habitat houses are sold to homepartner families at no profit. Homepartners repay through affordable, zero-interest, inflation-adjusted mortgage loans. These monthly mortgage payments are pooled into a Fund for Humanity so that the amortization of one house will help build another (\"House-for-a-House\" principle).

Habitat for Humanity is not a \"giveaway\" program. In addition to an initial down payment of one-third of the house cost and monthly mortgage repayments, homeowners invest hundreds of hours of their own labor - \"sweat equity\" -- into building their Habitat house and the houses of others.

Additional \"muscle\" for construction comes from volunteers from local affiliates, partner corporations and organizations, universities, schools, and youth groups. Volunteers even come from other countries, from as far away as Europe and the United States.

Working with Others, Achieving More
Habitat for Humanity\'s work is accomplished by affiliates -- independent, locally-run, non-profit volunteer groups. Each affiliate co-ordinates all aspects of Habitat home building in its area. The affiliate selects prospective partner families and secures suitable sites. It organizes mortgage services, fund-raising and donations of materials, and manpower for constructing houses.
Building communities through product alliances

Families Chosen on Need
An affiliate chooses homeowners based on their level of need, their ability to repay the loan and their willingness to work in partnership with Habitat. Affiliates follow a non-discriminatory policy of family selection. Religion is not a factor in choosing the families to become Habitat homeowners.

Funding Habitat\'s Work
Donors may choose to sponsor one third of a homepartner\'s house costs; the homepartner saves up the other third while the international Habitat community provides the rest. Thus, a 25-30 square-meter, concrete house that costs PhP70,000 today can be built for a donation of only PhP 25,000. This funding scheme called \"Save and Build\" helps potential homepartners better afford a house and to promote a savings culture among them.

My Discussions with Habitat for Humanity Philippines
I certainly don\'t want to re-invent the wheel here and these guys seem to be doing a great job on their own. We had a brief discussion on the merits of the domed house compared to their current construction methods.

The got back to me and said that although the dome was superior in every way to their current construction methods, it became one of community acceptance and that people did not like the shape of the domes and hence would not live in them. That struck me as extremely strange, as if I was giving someone something for 1/3rd its cost, and I was living in a cardboard box, would I say no to living in a dome.

I think it had more to do with the fact that the dome had never really been considered by them for this type of application as it does not really lend itself to multi-unit construction with a row of houses 100 mtr long down each side of a road. I have spoken with the people in Texas about this and they say definitely it could be done, and cheaper and faster and safer than what habitat is doing now.

But it is what it is and some people cannot be convinced of the merits as they have their own time proven methods of doing things.

Wayne
Wayne  ;D ;D

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Re: Dome Housing
« Reply #12 on: March 04, 2008, 04:07:54 PM »

They got back to me and said that although the dome was superior in every way to their current construction methods, it became one of community acceptance and that people did not like the shape of the domes and hence would not live in them. That struck me as extremely strange, as if I was giving someone something for 1/3rd its cost, and I was living in a cardboard box, would I say no to living in a dome.


This does not surprise me at all. When you consider the over ornate design of Philippine houses, to present someone with a featureless \'blob\' is not going to be very inspiring. Naturally, if the choice is between a cardboard box and a dome, then the dome will win, but this is not normally the case. If people are going to invest money in a house they would prefer something that is more conventional and socially acceptable. I would not like to live in a dome, but then I can afford not to. It does not matter how superior a dome is, you are not going to change peoples mind on what they consider to be an acceptable home.

Colin

Offline steveinvisayas

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Re: Dome Housing
« Reply #13 on: March 05, 2008, 12:31:54 AM »
Haha Dave, good one! I knew I liked that shape!
Steve Crawford
Damilag, Bukidnon

Offline michael16136

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Re: Dome Housing
« Reply #14 on: March 05, 2008, 10:03:48 AM »
I don\'t think I agree with Colin. True, those rich enough to afford those awful, rococo, ornate monstrosities are not going to want to live in a clean and simple dome, but then the domes aren\'t being designed for the rich and ostentatious. They\'re being designed for the working poor who typically live in featureless cinder block cubes, often with no indoor plumbing or running water. For that target demographic, I would think that the domes would be a welcome and popular alternative.