Author Topic: Dome housing.  (Read 17185 times)

Offline steveinvisayas

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Re: Dome Housing
« Reply #15 on: March 05, 2008, 10:24:56 AM »
I don\'t think I agree with Colin. True, those rich enough to afford those awful, rococo, ornate monstrosities are not going to want to live in a clean and simple dome, but then the domes aren\'t being designed for the rich and ostentatious. They\'re being designed for the working poor who typically live in featureless cinder block cubes, often with no indoor plumbing or running water. For that target demographic, I would think that the domes would be a welcome and popular alternative.

Right I won\'t want to build one (or 12) and have them be shunned. Acceptability to the working poor seems likely?
Steve Crawford
Damilag, Bukidnon

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Re: Dome Housing
« Reply #16 on: March 05, 2008, 10:54:49 AM »
I don\'t think I agree with Colin. True, those rich enough to afford those awful, rococo, ornate monstrosities are not going to want to live in a clean and simple dome, but then the domes aren\'t being designed for the rich and ostentatious. They\'re being designed for the working poor who typically live in featureless cinder block cubes, often with no indoor plumbing or running water. For that target demographic, I would think that the domes would be a welcome and popular alternative.

Wayne, I agree that a dome is vastly superior to a cinder block cube, but the question is whether they will be accepted. Maybe a few will have to be built to prove the point. The problem here is that Filipinos seem to want a ridiculously complex roof on the most simple of houses. This seems to be something even the poorest would like to aspire to. The comments from the Habitat foundation seem to confirm that. I am certainly not against domes, but you must be sure of market acceptance before any money is put into the project. There are alternative methods of construction that need to be considered such as the poured concrete wall and the foam sandwich construction. Both of these are quicker than conventional hollow block.

Colin

Offline coutts00

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Re: Dome Housing
« Reply #17 on: March 05, 2008, 11:02:13 AM »
Col\'

I think the only way to have it accepted, much the way it has been in the US, is to build a couple in a typhoon prone area such as Albay or Sorsogon or Samar. Watch what happens when the next big one comes through, see the devastation, all of the houses that loose their roofs, buildings that get destroyed. And then see how the acceptance changes as the dome comes through without a scratch, maybe a broken window or 2, but everyone and everything inside safe and sound.

People would be clamoring for them, many areas here are disaster prone, I personally want to build one for myself and my family and my wife can\'t wait. The energy savings alone will be one of the major reasons, the thermal mass of the solid concrete is what gives the savings and if I lose some nipa shielding from the roof, oh well it has to be replaced every couple of years anyway and it saves me from taking it down myself, I\'ll let the storm do it for me. One of the major things lacking here as in the rest of the world is affordable housing for the masses. This can answer many of those problems, the domes can be daisy chained together to form what is essentially something like a Caterpillar, yet each one being its own living space for a large family.

If we had an enterprising Yank or Brit Entrepreneur here who did it as an investment in his piece of heaven, how many families could he help, true it does not look like anything else built here, but in Muslim parts of the country domes are the way to go, just look at your average mosque.

This one in Texas has 7 sixty foot domes strung together.



And here is the inside.





Of course we would be looking at something on a smaller scale, say 10 30ft domes strung together, with interior walls separating them. This would be about 100 mtrs long, accommodate 80 people, and not be concerned about the next storm.

Wayne
Wayne  ;D ;D

Offline Beatle

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Re: Dome Housing
« Reply #18 on: March 06, 2008, 12:08:03 AM »

   Yesterday I was searching the internet and all I saw were plain round domes, nothing special, then I clicked on( forgive me I do not remember who\'s post it was) a link to a page that had a two-story dome with a grass roof and a balcony around the second floor, I went back to one of the web pages that had pictures of just a one story dome with no additional features. I called Salve(my Filipina wife)into the office and had her look at that picture and asked her what her opinion was and if she would live in one, A quick \"NO\" was her answer and then I clicked forward to the web page that had the grass roofed dome with a balcony and asked her what she thought of that house just by looking at the picture she didn\'t know it was a dome and she really liked it when I told her it was a dome that didn\'t matter anymore she said it was because of all the windows,grass roof and the balcony that she liked it.

    After pondering on Salve\'s reaction to these two different homes, it occurred to me that I would have never bought our home either if it was just a plain brick house, but it was the landscaping( the trees,shrubs,hedges,sandstone patio and rock waterfall ) that made it look applealing to the eyes. JMHO I think if these domes where to be built there should be enough room between each one so there would be room for improvements( Filipino style ).

            Ray Buhr
If you treat a servant like a servant, you will lead a alone. But if you treat a servant like a leader, multitudes will follow.  Beatle

Offline stillbilly2002

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Re: Dome Housing
« Reply #19 on: March 06, 2008, 02:54:45 AM »
 :)my in-laws house .the province................Baras ......eastern side .open to the pacific ocean.......it withstoood a force 4 storm
          if its proven to withstand the storm .you may have a selling point ;D

Offline coutts00

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Re: Dome Housing
« Reply #20 on: March 06, 2008, 03:43:25 AM »
The last big ones that blew thru Catanduanes were Reming and Durian, did they lose the GI sheet roof on the house? Would their house survive a landslide landing on top of it? As in any type of brick construction the mortar between the bricks is the weak point, when the mortar goes, so do the bricks, Catanduanes and Bicol just suffered a 6.5 Richter earthquake, and are expecting after shocks as well this week. 3-5-07 to put a date on the post. At the airport in Virac the fire station was demolished, all that was left were the vertical solid concrete pillars. The roof was torn off of one of the NFA (National Food Authority) warehouses and 1/2 the total rice stored in there was damaged by the storm and almost all of the schools, primary, secondary and university were damaged to the tune of millions of pesos. Even the Provincial Hospital was damaged and took out half of its beds capabilities.

Wayne
Wayne  ;D ;D

Offline coutts00

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Re: Dome Housing
« Reply #21 on: March 06, 2008, 03:55:46 AM »
Dome of a Home and Katrina

September 13, 2005

by Freda Parker

Dome of a Home, in Pensacola Beach, Florida, did it again! This 70\' x 54\', luxurious, beach front property that is the home of Valerie and Mark Sigler, as well as a bed and breakfast, has survived its third serious hurricane in a year.

This time, it was Katrina, the Category 5 hurricane that devastated so much of our Gulf Coast.

But unfortunately, not all of the facility escaped the wrath of the hurricanes. While inspecting the dome, Mark discovered part of a concrete wall, weighing about two tons, atop their geothermal well system.

\"Hurricane Ivan (September 2004) knocked down a block house next door to us,\" Mark reports. \"Our neighbors cleaned the debris away from that house. But they didn\'t see part of a wall covered by sand.

\"Somewhere between Hurricane Dennis (July 2005) and Katrina, that wall got moved,\" he continues. \"The surge came over and moved that concrete wall against the ring beam of our dome, and left it resting atop our geothermal well system. It crushed the well head.\"

Neither the wall nor the damage it caused could be seen until Mark began digging. \"Four to five feet down through all this sand, I began finding debris from this house that, at one time, was above ground and about 30 feet away from us,\" he says. \"A hurricane\'s water surge can turn everything to soup for seven or eight feet down. That\'s why you put the dome on pilings.\"

Seven geothermal wells serve Dome of a Home. Each goes down for about 250 feet. At about three feet below the surface, where the well head is, they all tie together and go in and out of the house. \"That\'s where the wall ended up,\" Mark says. \"I\'m repairing it today. That\'s the major extent of our damage. The dome itself is not damaged.\"

Although they have electrical power, Mark says that there is a serious shortage of materials, equipment and manpower in the area. \"It took me days to locate a lift with a basket that I can use to lift myself to the top of the dome, and it\'s 100 miles away,\" he says.

Nevertheless, Mark has started recoating the outside of the dome. He says, \"I\'ve already redone the underneath side. To make it even more water-resistant, I rhino lined the entire garage ceiling where all the pipes go through the house. Now, no matter how much water is driven up there, it won\'t come through the floor system.\"

Note: Rhino liner is a polyurethane material that can be sprayed onto concrete and many other surfaces to make them water-tight. It\'s most often used to line truck beds and/or the underside of a vehicle.





Wayne

P.S. I think even Colin would like to live here. Ayy\' Gov.
Wayne  ;D ;D

Offline coutts00

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Re: Dome Housing
« Reply #22 on: March 06, 2008, 04:09:59 AM »
One last thing to look at http://static.monolithic.com/plan-design/FEMA/index.html

Most of us know who FEMA is at least those of us with any time spent in the U.S.

Read this about what they have to say about Hurricane proof structures surviving 250 mph winds.

Wayne
Wayne  ;D ;D

Offline stillbilly2002

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Re: Dome Housing
« Reply #23 on: March 06, 2008, 04:50:52 AM »
 :)my family lives on the same island province as Wayne ...  my brother -in-law and myself have spent many$$$ (we are married to sisters so have the same in-laws.)  drama and crisis................go Wayne ;D

Offline stillbilly2002

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Re: Dome Housing
« Reply #24 on: March 06, 2008, 05:41:27 AM »
no Wayne ,it would not survive a landslide ............in Baras 4 people died when the mountian came down,the house next door.my father-in-law was awake ...........it had rained for days.. he heard the rumble.. got his wife and ran to the swamp ...in water up to their chest .............. :(we almost lost them.

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Re: Dome Housing
« Reply #25 on: March 06, 2008, 09:26:04 AM »
Dome of a Home and Katrina


P.S. I think even Colin would like to live here. Ayy\' Gov.


Wayne, now thats more like it, build me one and I will move in tomorrow  ;D

But I don\'t think this is what you had in mind for the poor  ;)

Colin

Offline coutts00

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Re: Dome Housing
« Reply #26 on: March 06, 2008, 04:18:46 PM »
Col\'

You are right, this is not what I visioned for the poor, however with the nature in which these homes are built, it is much like a sculptor, add some thing here, take something from there, have you ever made a paper mache balloon or been shown one, once the basic structure is in place on the balloon, you can do pretty much whatever you want from there. We can add stem walls to the base to add more height, we can submerge the stem walls to give space without the appearance of size or height. We can elongate the dome, flatten it, we could turn it into a half shell, put big holes in it, make openings for balconies or a terrace on the roof.

And your interior options are unlimited, as none of the interior walls are load bearing, the dome is constructed as a monolithic shell about 2-3 inches thick. The floor is 4 inches thick and the foundation about 8 - 12 inches.

Show the pictures to your asawa and see what she thinks, think about what you could do instead of being limited to the basic shape. One of the many options being put forward in the dome community is to bury the domes, i.e. cover them with dirt and grow grass on top, build multiple small domes and link them together with tunnel hallways.

We are going to do a house in catanduanes i 5-10 yrs when my asawa can settle down a little, that has 3 domes, the center one being the main living space about 50 feet in diameter, submerged 15 feet into the ground with a wide path of steps leading up to the beach side entry, there would be glazing in an arch 15 feet high to let in the morning light as we watch the sunrise everyday, this would open into an atrium for the dining area, essentially a huge kitchen living space, this area would be divided in half by a rock wall built of local stone with a waterfall running down it which would help cool the interior through evaporation. On the back side of this rock wall is the subterranean garage and laundry area, above the garage is my office and a balcony for evening beers with my wife and friends. Spaced about 20 feet on either side of the main dome and back about 30 degrees are the two bedroom domes, each 40 feet in diameter, one would be the master suite with a private patio inset into the dome looking out onto the beach, ensuite with rock wall waterfall shower and jacuzzi tub, and a walk in closet for each of us. Taking up half of the upper portion of the dome is a library for my wife, her private reading room of sorts and her office with her own balcony.

The other dome on the other side of the main dome is the second bedroom dome, this it the same 2 story dome, same 40 foot diameter, this one however contains 4 bedrooms dormitory style and 2 bathrooms on the upper floor, on the lower floor is the TV / Entertainment area. The domes will be linked by cylindrical tunnels with cutouts for windows, no actual windows. Outside the domes will me a large deck and barbeque area which will fill the spaces between the domes.

The dome is what you make it and your own imagination. But to live in this land of extremes, especially the wind and the rain and the heat when its not blowin or gettin drenched to the core, we need something a little more robust, and as I am an Australian and damn proud of it, I just have to be different. This construction will last 200 yrs without a problem, it may be redesigned by grandchildren and their grandchildren but it will stand the test of time as the outer shell is what makes it what it is and defines its durability.

Wayne
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Re: Dome Housing
« Reply #27 on: March 06, 2008, 05:57:54 PM »
Hi Wayne,

Your house sounds good, but would you have any problems getting planning permission? I am now in the process of designing a house for our lot, but it is only 50 ft wide by 300 feet long. I would also need to raise my house above ground level because the ground  can get wet during heavy rain. How would you construct a large dome, would you still use air bags? The idea of a dome sound interesting, but I don\'t think it would work for me.

Colin

Offline coutts00

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Re: Dome Housing
« Reply #28 on: March 06, 2008, 06:32:09 PM »
Col\'

Yes we can build domes with the air forms up to about 300 feet in diameter, there is one in the U.S. that contains an entire high school in one dome, with a Basket ball court and gymnasium integrated as well. All of the class rooms and office space is in the one dome.

This one pictured in Emmett, Idaho has 2 domes.


The 900 student Emmett High School uses two 180 foot diameter domes to house the classrooms and gymnasium.
Three smaller domes house the woodworking, metal, and auto shops.


The superintendent, Ronald Noble, reports that the dome saves at least 66 percent
in energy costs over the district\'s other conventional schools.


Three floors of classrooms surround a five story tall atrium.
A 25 foot diameter artificial skylight provides a daylight atmosphere during all weather conditions.


The double-wide gym can seat 3,000 for graduation ceremonies.
The dome also houses a weight room, wrestling room, locker rooms, offices, concessions,
and a little 350 seat theater.

And here is one in Florida

Aerial view of Bishop Nevins Academy, playground, surrounding parking and nearby neighborhood.

Wayne
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Re: Dome housing.
« Reply #29 on: March 06, 2008, 11:14:26 PM »
I\'m the one who voted \"It will never happen\".  Whatever expats decide to do in the RP will have little impact on life as it is here.  You may think that domes are inexpensive, but those that have been pictured in this thread would never be suitable for the preponderance of the population.  Too expensive to begin with.  Ill designed for a tropical climate, small unshaded window openings and poor natural air circulation.  Add a/c to make them livable and you eliminate 80% of the population in one stroke.  They may have a chance if there were no other alternatives, but inexpensive structures adapted to the climate have existed here for over 4,000 years. 

About 1991 or 1992 a super typhoon passed directly over Cebu and destroyed thousands of houses.  The Plan and CCF together engaged a New York architect to design replacement houses and in a short time they came up with a plan that used local materials, were plentiful in supply, were inexpensive to build and could be done quickly and easily by local labor.  The design had to provide a structure that could weather a typhoon and even if damaged, would be cheap and quick to repair.  Some of these structures would also have to be placed where there was no power available.  The simple house plan that was devised consisted of a wood frame of coco lumber, walls and floors of bamboo and roof of nipa (all inexpensive, local and plentiful).  If a typhoon blew away the roofs and walls, they could be quickly replaced.

The irony of the design is that it was almost identical to the native houses that have been built here for centuries. 

Until a design that can better the native house is found, dome housing will never \"catch on\" here.