Philippines Insider" The Ultimate Philippines Travel Guide for Tourists and Expats

Author Topic: Dome housing.  (Read 18715 times)

Offline Beatle

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Re: Dome housing.
« Reply #30 on: March 07, 2008, 01:50:35 AM »

   Ron,
             This Sunday I am going to take a copy of the picture that Wayne posted of the dome home that had the grass roof and balcony around it and take to it my Filipino church ( over 100 Filipino members ) and show it to them. I will ask them if they were living  in the Philippines if they would live in it or would they turn it down. I realize it would not be a two story home but its the extras ( grass roof,
 balcony etc... ) that makes a house a home.

              I am curious as to what all of this forums asawas think about the dome homes. Would you all ask your wives what their feelings are about the dome homes? Would they live in one? I believe we have enough here that we could get a good sampling of how they ( the Filipino ) feels about this type of dwelling.

                                                              Ray Buhr

 
If you treat a servant like a servant, you will lead a alone. But if you treat a servant like a leader, multitudes will follow.  Beatle

Offline stillbilly2002

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Re: Dome housing.
« Reply #31 on: March 07, 2008, 02:33:47 AM »
Wayne....good thing the Aussies were on our side in ww11  ;D thank you ........would have been a good one -two punch......
 glad the honorable sons of the Empire didnt think of it...... ;D
  you surge ahead ........and brass it out when need be.   as a American i admire you.
 its ok.......if Ron is right well ...you will have your Dome house......everybody else is free to go thier own way.......i at a later date would like to here more about  in incountry.........Baras, Virac, Bato,........ill keepm in touch>>>>Colin, you speak your mind ..always good to read your posts....all of them.............Greywolf...The Captain....all you.....a-teamers....... B-ray.....everyone else.... ;D
 better stop before i need a hankie........i need to be greatful every day for my wonderful Asawa.......

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Re: Dome housing.
« Reply #32 on: March 07, 2008, 07:07:03 AM »
Thanks Billy, you have made my day  :) ;D 8)

Colin

Offline coutts00

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Re: Dome housing.
« Reply #33 on: March 07, 2008, 10:21:20 AM »
About 1991 or 1992 a super typhoon passed directly over Cebu and destroyed thousands of houses.  The Plan and CCF together engaged a New York architect to design replacement houses and in a short time they came up with a plan that used local materials, were plentiful in supply, were inexpensive to build and could be done quickly and easily by local labor.  The design had to provide a structure that could weather a typhoon and even if damaged, would be cheap and quick to repair.  Some of these structures would also have to be placed where there was no power available.  The simple house plan that was devised consisted of a wood frame of coco lumber, walls and floors of bamboo and roof of nipa (all inexpensive, local and plentiful).  If a typhoon blew away the roofs and walls, they could be quickly replaced.

The irony of the design is that it was almost identical to the native houses that have been built here for centuries. 

Until a design that can better the native house is found, dome housing will never \"catch on\" here.


Ron,

I agree that the native house is inexpensive to build and inexpensive to maintain.

However a couple of points to address:

Would you like to be in one of these houses when a typhoon blows through?

I for one would not, because myself and everything in the house would blow away with the roof and the walls.

The Philippine housing dept, has a budget at the moment of 40,000p per house, my quote of 50 - 60kp included paying for labor. If similar to the Habitat plan and the owner and his family built the house with supervision then that cost is reduced considerably.

Power is soon to be available in all barangays and villages according to GMA, so the running of the generator and blower for the airform should not be an issue.

As to the size of the windows and ventilation, it is strictly up to the owner of the house, as I had mentioned in a previous post the dome could be built as a half shell like an amphitheater and still maintain its integrity, so the size of the windows is not an issue, also with a vent in the roof natural convection would push hot air to the roof and out the vent, drawing cool air in behind it to replace it. And the thermal mass of the concrete acts as a barrier to the heat, if you add a nipa roof to the outside then you dramatically increase the insulating properties of the concrete.

These domes were designed for this type of weather, not for colder climates. For colder climates we need to add insulation in the form of a 2 part urethane expanding insulation sprayed on to the concrete.

If I ask anyone who has lived in a nipa hut, like my wife for example who grew up in one and spent the first 20 yrs of her life in one, the nipa hut or a dome, the dome wins hands down... She has had the first hand experience of sitting through a super typhoon huddled in the corner of a room with her father wrapping his arms around the family as a big storm blew through and took the roof and walls of the house with it and most of their possessions. Like yourself, I live with the average people, and those around me are enthusiastic. They are either from a province or have families in provinces, and no place in these islands is immune to the effects of typhoons.

So Ron, I may be an expat from somewhere... but I adapt to my surroundings, I feel for the people and want to better their lives. As I explain to any employee that comes to work for me, I am no better than them because my skin is white, I am a human just like them, I have no college degree like them, I want them to hold their heads up and be proud of who they are, remember that the people who come to our store that we sell to are no better than my employees and they should not feel less or allow themselves to be treated as lesser persons.

Everyone has a right to a secure place to live, one that won\'t blow away in the next storm with them in it.

These are some pictures of a domed village built in Tropical Indonesia, similar climate to the Philippines if I am not correct Ron.









You can view them all here:

http://dftw.org/gallery/main.php?g2_itemId=1095

Wayne

Wayne  ;D ;D

Offline graham

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Re: Dome housing.
« Reply #34 on: March 07, 2008, 11:26:30 AM »
Ray,
I showed my asawa these domes, she laughed at first then when I explained the advantages to her and she had read Waynes messages on them she then straight away started designing one for us.

Wayne,
Your doing a fantastic job, what an inspiration you are. Keep pushing, I hope this gets off the ground, you have my support. I was going to say that I\'m right behind you, but a different connotation might be put on that!!! :o

Graham

Offline fred

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Re: Dome housing.
« Reply #35 on: March 07, 2008, 11:46:00 AM »
Quote
These domes were designed for this type of weather, not for colder climates. For colder climates we need to add insulation in the form of a 2 part urethane expanding insulation sprayed on to the concrete.

Is that what the Eskimo`s do?..Sorry..Couldn`t resist!
I have seen these dome designs before on another site but it has been far  more interesting reading your perspective.
I like the idea to some extent but cannot get my head around the fact it is a concrete igloo..
I hope you continue to post though as I am pretty open minded.. Fascinated to see how the design could be adapted slightly to make the appearance slightly more appealing.
I fully understand that white paint would reflect a lot of the heat but I really think you would need an insulated ceiling creating a heat barrier..I think that space should also be well vented..
Needs some work but we are getting there!


Offline coutts00

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Re: Dome housing.
« Reply #36 on: March 07, 2008, 08:25:54 PM »
Some shapes for you to consider, almost anything is possible:

This article is an excerpt from the article \"The Monolithic Dome\".
Monolithic Dome Shapes

by David B. South

Here are most of the pure geometric shapes we use in designing the Airforms that are inflated to build Monolithic Domes. These shapes are shown individually. But they can be intersected with each other to provide additional combinations. And their connections can be smoothed to better define the sculptured shapes. In addition to these regular shapes, others can be airformed as well.

Low profile: This is the most efficient shape to cover the greatest amount of floor space. Especially useful for large domes.
   
Perspective Top View Side View

Hemisphere: Surface area is double the floor area. Useful for high volume storage buildings and smaller structures, such as homes.
   
Perspective Top View Side View

High profile spherical segment:
The most volume for the least floor area. Ideal for water tanks, storage buildings, unique looking homes and golf course club houses.

Perspective Top View Side View

Oblate ellipsoid: Very efficient for single floor structures, such as a home or school. Walls have maximum vertical slope vs structure size.
   
Perspective Top View Side View

Prolate ellipsoid (Long Axis Vertical): Mostly useful for bulk storage. It is very tall vs its footprint. Extremely strong for an underground or buried building.
   
Perspective Top View Side View

Prolate ellipsoid (Long Axis Horizontal): This dome literally leans out from the floor level before curving over the top. Elliptical base creates a very unique space.
   
Perspective Top View Side View

Torus: Not as space efficient as a dome, but it has some fun applications, i.e. a home with a center courtyard or garden.
   
Perspective Top View Side View

FAQs about Monolithic Dome shapes

1) Since the center section is not constructed in a torus, is it less expensive to build?

Actually, no. The dome curves in on itself again to make the tube, thereby increasing the surface area of the dome shell.

2) What is the usual size of a torus and have you ever built one?

A common home size is 66 feet in diameter with a 32-foot diameter center section. It definitely can be much larger. So far, the torus has failed the cost test. A Monolithic Dome of equal size is about the same price.

3) What is the maximum height at the center of an oblate ellipsoid style dome?

An oblate ellipsoid is an ideal shape for homes and one-story buildings. It brings the height of the dome down; but the walls at the base are more vertical so it provides more shoulder room. In general, an oblate ellipsoid should not have a minor-axis-to-major-axis ratio greater than 1.45. Consider a 32-foot diameter dome. The major axis is 16 feet. Divide 16 by 1.45 and the minor axis is 11 feet.

If we wanted the building to be two-stories high, we would put a 7-foot or 8-foot stemwall under the elliptical dome for a total height of 19 or 20 feet. The Oberon plan (\"Dome Living: A Creative Guide for Planning Your Monolithic Dream Home\", pp. 64-67) is an oblate ellipsoid, 32 feet in diameter and 12 feet tall. It makes a nice, one-story home with one, two, three or even four bedrooms.

4) The prolate looks as though it may have better interior feel and window options. Am I seeing this correctly?

Sometimes a prolate fits the lot better. Rarely does it make the windows or shape better. Mostly, it may look better on paper; but in reality, you cannot see anything but a small part of it from the street or inside. There is very little benefit to the prolate, except for site considerations. Eye of the Storm has the long axis parallel with the beach; therefore more beach can be seen from the house. The house still looks circular from the beach. It also looks circular from within. It just has more exposure to the ocean because it is a prolate. The prolate costs more per square foot. It takes more material to enclose a smaller space than a traditional circular shape.

5) Are profiles other than the circular and elliptical available?

Yes -- we can do cones, cylinders, parabolas, some hyperbolics, and some sculpted shapes. Air tends to blow round, therefore at least one dimension of the Airform must be round. The only limitations are that it must be inflatable and engineerable.
 
Wayne  ;D ;D

Offline coutts00

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Re: Dome housing.
« Reply #37 on: March 07, 2008, 09:12:38 PM »
The perfect way to keep the dome cool, just have to find a Philippine climber vine. I am sure there is one around...



Wayne
Wayne  ;D ;D

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Re: Dome housing.
« Reply #38 on: March 07, 2008, 09:27:52 PM »
Wayne, did you know that there was an enterprising company that took advantage of all the failures of people to build houses using inflatable forms; they bought them up and sold them as bouncy castles  ;D

Colin

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Re: Dome housing.
« Reply #39 on: March 07, 2008, 09:52:31 PM »
Can I rent one for barangay fiesta in May?  ;)

Offline coutts00

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Re: Dome housing.
« Reply #40 on: March 07, 2008, 10:01:35 PM »
I have always wondered if there is a market here for bounce houses. Especially for the mandatory first birthday parties, always trying to find something to do with the kids as the adults turn it into a reason for a drinking session and karaoke night. I have been to several myself, but they go and make me guest of honor which embarrasses me no end. I thought it was the kids birthday, I am just a friend of the family and all of a sudden, everyone is focused on me. Darn this white skin, I need to tan faster, but I hardly ever leave the store.

Wayne
Wayne  ;D ;D

Offline RUFUS

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Re: Dome housing.
« Reply #41 on: March 08, 2008, 12:39:00 AM »
Drinking, karaoke and bouncy houses...
Am I invited?


RUFUS
SO SAYETH THE RUFUS

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Re: Dome housing.
« Reply #42 on: March 08, 2008, 12:07:47 PM »
I have always wondered if there is a market here for bounce houses. Especially for the mandatory first birthday parties, always trying to find something to do with the kids as the adults turn it into a reason for a drinking session and karaoke night. I have been to several myself, but they go and make me guest of honor which embarrasses me no end. I thought it was the kids birthday, I am just a friend of the family and all of a sudden, everyone is focused on me. Darn this white skin, I need to tan faster, but I hardly ever leave the store.

Wayne

My wife is getting annoyed with her family about the numerous birthday parties. We are expected to provide money for the food, order and collect the birthday cake and ice cream, then when we arrive the men are standing around waiting for us to pay for the beer. Everyone then just sits around playing cards and drinking. A birthday here is not for the benefit of the celebrant, but just an excuse to gamble and drink. I feel sorry for the kids at these parties.

Colin

Offline coutts00

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Re: Dome housing.
« Reply #43 on: March 08, 2008, 12:33:08 PM »
Hey Colin, send your condolences, and a present, and go play golf that day. I am sure that their livers won\'t miss the quantity of alcohol your were expected to provide, and maybe the kids will have a better day with their fathers as they won\'t be drunk that day.

Wayne
Wayne  ;D ;D

Offline fred

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Re: Dome housing.
« Reply #44 on: March 08, 2008, 01:21:27 PM »
Wayne.. If you have time could you take us through the building process as I cant seem to find anything with images online..
Where would you get one of these air bags and that blower?
So when the bag is inflated what is the next step?
I saw one picture you posted and think it might be something that I can work with on my next project..(tourist cottages)

Dressed with that nipa roof,things are looking much better..(and cooler too)

Another suggestion.. If you really want to show the local organisations how to build cheap accommodation for the poor then why not consult with one of the charities  like gawadkalinga  (housing charity).. There are a few foreigners involved with that one I believe..
Unfortunately their site is down for some reason at the moment..