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Author Topic: electricity in the Philippines  (Read 56650 times)

Offline harry80020

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Re: electricity in the Philippines
« Reply #90 on: June 05, 2013, 09:47:50 PM »
Hi Phil,

    The house I wired in the Philippines was my father in law's, I live in Colorado.  At that time the in laws had a few 120 volt appliances that had been sent to them from the USA.  They used several of the little individual plug in transformers of different sizes and also had a larger 1 kilo watt trans transformer for the microwave.  About all of the original 120 volt things have quit working and have been replaced by 220 volt items bought there.

    There is no reason you can't install your own step-down transformer & sub panel for your American appliances & tools.  The transformer will need to be a 220 volt primary, doesn't matter if it's center tapped or not.  The secondary needs to be 220 volts WITH center tap or just a 120 volt secondary, depending on how you want to wire it.  If you use the center tapped secondary, you absolutely need an American style 220/110 sub panel (or 2 Philippine style panels).  The American style panel can also be altered to work on the Philippine 220 system, just jumper the 2 busses together & use single pole breakers.   Best to size the transformer to about 125% of the total load for the appliances/tools that would under normal/usual conditions be on at any one time.  A Sola transformer holds the secondary steadier when the primary voltage varies.  I don't know how much, or if, the voltage there varies, in Sibonga it seemed to be more a case of either on or off.

   Yes, installing a system like this can be expensive, weather or not it is a good value would depend on a lot of things.  I think my father-in-law's roof might leak a little to much for insulation in the ceiling.  But a plastic vapor under concrete seems like a wonderful idea, as does a white or silver roof.

Best always,
Harry..

From: Philip Dronen
To: "harry80020@yahoo.com" <harry80020@yahoo.com>
Sent: Tuesday, June 4, 2013 6:09 PM
Subject: electrical
Harry-
      I have been reading your notes regarding construction of your home with great interest.  It has been very helpful in planning our project in Leyte to begin next year.  No where is there any discussion of step down issues to run american appliances.  I would like to run several circuits dedicated with ground fault adapters at end of each line.  If possible would like to run to the kitchen, bathrooms and perhaps to outside for use of power tools.  None of these will require any more than 3,500 watt requirements and it seems a sub panel (step up step down sole unit) would meet our needs without the moving of portable inverters as required. Is this something that you had considered?  and if so what do you think would make the most sence?  The area will be a single drop line.  I have found an item such as this in us however cost is over 1,000 usd and is for 10,000 watts.  On another note why did you not use insulation in your roofing? Our architechual plans call for it as well as plastic under the slab mostly to prevent insect/termite issues.  If you could be so kind as to reply to the above I would appreciate your help.  Most Sincerely;Phil Dronen   

Offline harry80020

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Re: electricity in the Philippines
« Reply #91 on: June 06, 2013, 09:24:17 PM »
Dear Phil,

    I apologize for forgetting to address the GFCI issue in my first letter.  It is a wonderful idea, but I don't know it 110 volt GFCI's will work on 220?  I had wondered about this issue when I was getting ready to wire my father-in-law's house and had actually written the GFCI manufacturer for advice, but never received a reply.  I was afraid at least the test function the GFCI would be damaged, among other concerns.  You might check with an electrician or supply house there to see if there is a local product to use.  There is no problem with the standard American single pole breakers, they work equally well on both 110 & 220.

Best always,
Harry.

From: Philip Dronen
To: Harry Morgan <harry80020@yahoo.com>
Sent: Wednesday, June 5, 2013 5:42 PM
Subject: Re: electrical
Thank-you so much for your help. I will do the research regarding the step down transformer availability here. The good news is my wife has a relative that is an engineer (electrical) so will meet with her to discuss further.  Already on the site is a new 100 amp square d box and multiple breakers. I assume this will work as a sub panel and am returning to us in October for couple of weeks can purchase additional single pole breakers.  I am primarily concerned with the gfi in bathrooms and kitchen for safety and have multiple power tools here that should never stop working.  As i am sure you can tell not an electrician but want a working knowledge of this prior to installation.  It wood seem that 220 is actually more cost effective than 120. The roofing specs call for long span with steel trusses so I would expect it to be water tight. Due perhaps to the language barrier it has been difficult to explain my needs and your e mail will go a long way to that end.  Thanks again. Phil

Offline JoeLP

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Re: electricity in the Philippines
« Reply #92 on: June 21, 2013, 09:06:03 PM »
I do have a question about wiring in the phils.  When there I notice that the "power boxes" are similar to our boxes here.  The one my friend Maki has has breakers that look very similar to ours also.  So here's my question.....can you use a 110 breaker on a box there and run a circuit of 110 wire?  Or do the boxes there not permit for that?  I remember my dad always putting the boxes together on houses he build when I was growing up and would spend a day with him at his company.  He could use both 110 and 220 breakers(fuses earlier in my childhood) on the same "spine" of the power box.  If such is available there, I can see myself running a couple circuits in the house with maybe a different color plug or something to keep them "separated" in appearance from the normal 220.

Thanks for any help.
In the land of the blind, the one eyed man is king.

Offline Gray Wolf

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Re: electricity in the Philippines
« Reply #93 on: June 22, 2013, 05:28:21 AM »
I do have a question about wiring in the phils.  When there I notice that the "power boxes" are similar to our boxes here.  The one my friend Maki has has breakers that look very similar to ours also.  So here's my question.....can you use a 110 breaker on a box there and run a circuit of 110 wire?  Or do the boxes there not permit for that?  I remember my dad always putting the boxes together on houses he build when I was growing up and would spend a day with him at his company.  He could use both 110 and 220 breakers(fuses earlier in my childhood) on the same "spine" of the power box.  If such is available there, I can see myself running a couple circuits in the house with maybe a different color plug or something to keep them "separated" in appearance from the normal 220.

Thanks for any help.

The electric grid in the Philippines is strictly 220
Louisville, KY USA - Bagong Silang, Caloocan City, PH

Offline Lee2

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Re: electricity in the Philippines
« Reply #94 on: June 22, 2013, 08:07:02 AM »
But some electric providers such as Veco will install a 110 transformer on a pole in front of a home so a person can have both or just 110 if they are willing to pay extra for it. A 110 house would probably not be feasible in the Philippines but a few 110 outlets might if a person does not make a mistake and plug in a 110 device into a 220 socket, I know because I plugged in a rechargeable drill charger and poof it went and I knew much better than to do that but while working around the condo I forgot for a second and it was too late.

I use 110 extension cords and never have a problem but if the box is not rated for 220 for some reason then it would probably not be good to install one. I looked up some Square D panels at Home Depot and they says 110 and 240 so it would work, see below.
http://www.homedepot.com/p/Square-D-by-Schneider-Electric-Homeline-125-Amp-12-Space-12-Circuit-Indoor-Main-Lugs-Load-Center-with-Cover-HOM12L125C/202495819#.UcTpOPlJNl4 
http://www.homedepot.com/p/Square-D-by-Schneider-Electric-Homeline-200-Amp-30-Space-40-Circuit-Main-Breaker-Indoor-Service-Upgrade-Load-Center-Removable-End-Walls-Value-Pack-HOM3040M200EPVP/202495854#.UcTqWflJNl4 
:) Happily married since 1994 & live part of the year in Cebu and the rest in S. Florida.

Offline hitekcountry

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Re: electricity in the Philippines
« Reply #95 on: June 23, 2013, 01:15:21 AM »
Not 100% sure what your question is. If you’re trying to create a 110 circuit by removing the existing breaker in a 220 panel and replacing it with what you call a 110 breaker, the answer is no that won’t work. The breaker is simply a switch and what voltage is on the bus that the breaker is plugged into is the voltage that will come out the other side of the breaker. 220v in 220v out.

Offline harry80020

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Re: electricity in the Philippines
« Reply #96 on: August 05, 2013, 10:41:18 PM »
Thanks to Gary Dadds

"What do you consider a neutral to be? Keeping it simple the neutral is just the
> supply companies ground. The supply company will be generating 3-phase the
> center will be connected to an earth rod going tens of metres into the ground.
> This grounding point is what is supplied to you as the neutral wire. It may also
> be tied down to a ground rod in the local substation. Although the neutral is
> effectively a ground it is carrying all of the return current so can develop a
> small voltage. Because of this the neutral should not be connected to the metal
> case of any appliance. This is what the local clean earth from your ground rod
> is for."

Offline Metz

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Re: electricity in the Philippines
« Reply #97 on: August 30, 2013, 07:08:25 PM »
I just wired up a new shop this month.  The specs here were 25kva transformer just for the building.  (Owner bought  it just for herself)

8ga from the meter to the shop
Every outlet separate breaker, 8ga wire.

The fuse box was a little more expensive than the standard American style bus bar but the breakers themselves were cheaper.

There was no ground before.  I ran new ground wire and tapped it into exposed rebar tied into the retaining wall behind the building.

Belkin surge protector power strip on the electronics and a voltage regulator.

I need about 60-70 amps to power everything right now.

Have a couple die stamping machines on order that are 2hp single phase each.

So far so good
« Last Edit: August 31, 2013, 02:46:53 AM by Gray Wolf »

Offline graham

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Re: electricity in the Philippines
« Reply #98 on: September 11, 2013, 12:59:28 PM »
Metz,

Pardon my ignorance as I'm no electrician. But being as the rebar is buried in concrete
is concrete a conductor? To my way of thinking it would not provide a substantial ground.

Harry???????

Offline coleman2347

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Re: electricity in the Philippines
« Reply #99 on: September 11, 2013, 01:20:00 PM »
Graham, in another post it was mentioned you live in the south...can you post whats really happening down there?

This link might help you understand the stuff about grounding...hope it helps...Lee

http://www.ehow.com/about_5494279_electricity-go-ground.html
The only thing worse than wanting to do it is not doing it

Offline wildbill

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Re: electricity in the Philippines
« Reply #100 on: September 12, 2013, 07:09:58 AM »
Keep this in mind  If you live way out in the Province most have lots of Brown outs always you will need a Generator I love the province but I hate the brown outs we been having them like every day some time all day long 8 to 10 hours I want to sell and move back to Dasma cavite.:(

Offline graham

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Re: electricity in the Philippines
« Reply #101 on: September 12, 2013, 10:14:58 AM »
Lee,

Nothing much happening where I live, which is near the top of Mindanao.
CDO is generally a quiet place to live. I have never felt threatened ever in
the 6 years I've lived here.
This link should tell you why the upsurge at this time.

http://ph.news.yahoo.com/muslim-rebel-attack-shuts-down-philippine-city-001638952.html

I do have a working knowledge of electricity, and thanks for the info you supplied.
I have a 3 wire grounded system with a 3 metre grounding rod thru the sand
down into moisture supplied by the ocean.
My comment was that I thought if rebar is imbedded and completely enclosed in
the concrete, is concrete a conductor??

I seriously doubt it. While working in PNG I overhauled a Dorman Diesel Genset. I disconnected
the o'head power lines to the compound and attached a welding/genset in their place while I did the
necessary repairs. After completion I re-attached the o'head wires from the main gen. I accidentally
reversed the wiring and it had a 40amp draw. This "was" 1965, so I have learnt lot's more since then LOL. 

I went into the kitchen area and while kneeling received a very slight tingle thru the concrete floor
I checked the earth rod and the ground around it was bubbling. Reversed the wires and had no more trouble.

Graham   
« Last Edit: September 13, 2013, 12:06:40 AM by Gray Wolf »

Offline graham

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Re: electricity in the Philippines
« Reply #102 on: September 12, 2013, 10:24:55 AM »
WB,

We have blackouts here too due to the non-servicing of the power plants.
The demand far exceeds the supply. Fortunately I must have my house
close to "someone important". Very rarely does my area suffer power outage.
It does go when we have very high winds or torrential rain, but it is quickly
restored in most cases. Thankfully.

A mate of mine in Isabella, up the top of Luzon had to run his genset for 35 days
continuous, after Sendong. He experiences many blackouts and built himself an industrial genset.

Graham

Offline hitekcountry

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Re: electricity in the Philippines
« Reply #103 on: September 12, 2013, 01:00:59 PM »
@Graham   “ To my way of thinking it would not provide a substantial ground.”

NEC (National Electrical Code), code used throughout the US and many other countries, lists ufer grounding system (rebar incased in concrete) as one of the accepted methods to connect to ground. The requirements are that the grounding rebar must be 20ft (6.0m) min. in length, and there cannot be an insulating membrane between the concrete and the ground. NEC 250.52(a)

“ if rebar is imbedded and completely enclosed in the concrete, is concrete a conductor??”

Is concrete a conductor? Well not a very good conductor but then neither is wood but lightning will strike a tree as part of its path to ground, but of course a tree is full of moisture. Well guess what, concrete has moisture in it also, even if it was poured decades ago. It takes a very sensitive meter to measure it but it’s there.

Offline graham

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Re: electricity in the Philippines
« Reply #104 on: September 13, 2013, 12:03:39 PM »
@Graham   “ To my way of thinking it would not provide a substantial ground.”

NEC (National Electrical Code), code used throughout the US and many other countries, lists ufer grounding system (rebar incased in concrete) as one of the accepted methods to connect to ground. The requirements are that the grounding rebar must be 20ft (6.0m) min. in length, and there cannot be an insulating membrane between the concrete and the ground. NEC 250.52(a)

“ if rebar is imbedded and completely enclosed in the concrete, is concrete a conductor??”

Is concrete a conductor? Well not a very good conductor but then neither is wood but lightning will strike a tree as part of its path to ground, but of course a tree is full of moisture. Well guess what, concrete has moisture in it also, even if it was poured decades ago. It takes a very sensitive meter to measure it but it’s there.

Well, I would have sworn on a stack of bibles it wouldn't be a conductor.
"Never be too sure of anything" should be my new motto LOL

Graham.