Philippines Insider" The Ultimate Philippines Travel Guide for Tourists and Expats

Author Topic: electricity in the Philippines  (Read 56843 times)

Offline harry80020

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Re: electricity in the Philippines
« Reply #45 on: September 28, 2010, 01:45:42 AM »
Dear Matt,

    Since your saw is already wired for 220 volts, it will work just fine in the PI.  The third wire you have in the power cord now is for grounding the metal frame & other metal parts of the saw for safety.  But most of the power receptacles in the PI have only the 2 circuit wires, they are missing the ground wire.  All of the electric receptacles I have seen in the PI are the standard 2 prong 15 amp units we use in the USA.  You will likely have to install a new 2 prong plug on the power cord and find another way to ground the frame of the saw.

Best always,
Harry.

PS,
    You forgot to wish me \"Happy Birthday\", today is my birthday.

   

--- On Mon, 9/27/10, Matt Wilson wrote:


    From: Matt Wilson
    Subject: wireing a table saw in Philippines
    To: harry80020@yahoo.com
    Date: Monday, September 27, 2010, 10:51 AM

    Hi Harry I was wanting to ship my tabe saw to the Philippines but I dont know how to wire it to the two-wire 220 volts they have there.  My table saw motor works on eather 115volts or 230 volts 60 HZ ; Right now it is wired for 230 volts with three wires. How do I wire the motor to the two wire, 220 volts they have in the Philippines ?  Thanks Matt Wilson

Offline harry80020

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Re: electricity in the Philippines
« Reply #46 on: September 28, 2010, 09:27:00 PM »
Dear Matt,

    There is one thing I forgot to mention, I am getting older.  Is there anything on the saw that operates on 110 volts?  In the past on 220 appliances with only a 3 wire power cord, manufacturers used to use the ground wire for 110 AC return if there was anything on the unit that operated on 110 volts.  Now we run 4 wires for 220: 2 circuit wires, 1 neutral, and 1 grounding wire.  I addressed these and other issues in a 4 page article I posted on our Forum.  On page 4 of the article is comments for a table saw I gave to another person with the same question as yours.  You can read all of my comments here:
http://livinginthephilippines.com/forum/index.php/topic,661.0.html

    If you aren\'t already a member of out sister site, you should join, there is info on just about everything you could ask about things in the PI.

Best always,
Harry.

--- On Mon, 9/27/10, Matt Wilson wrote:


    From: Matt Wilson
    Subject: RE: wireing a table saw in Philippines
    To: harry80020@yahoo.com
    Date: Monday, September 27, 2010, 9:12 PM

    Harry thanks for the information about how to wire up my table saw in the Philippines, it doesn\'t sound as hard as I thought it might be. I am sure I can handle putting on the new receptacle for the two wires and I can figure out how to ground the chassis to earth ground. I can\'t thank you enough for the help, I really appreciate your expertise advice, THANKS!  Regards, Matt Wilson in Pillar Point Harbor, CA.
     

Offline c_a_p_t_a_i_n_r_o_n

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Re: electricity in the Philippines
« Reply #47 on: September 29, 2010, 02:40:09 AM »
Happy birthday Harry

I\'m sure I\'ll get to use your words of wisdom somewhere down the line

Offline harry80020

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Re: electricity in the Philippines
« Reply #48 on: October 06, 2010, 10:27:19 PM »
Dear Justin,

    It is very very important to ground your panel box, as well as metal parts of appliances.  If it isn\'t grounded there is nothing to shut the circuit down in the event a hot wire somehow touches the metal.  The metal will be energized and you will get shocked if you touch it.  I doubt it will do any good to fire your current electrician and hire another, as the second electrician will have been trained about the same.  It might be better to politely try to get your current electrician to change his ways?

    Yes, you can ground electric appliances individually.  It is difficult to install grounding outlets after the house is built if there is no ground wire run to each outlet.

Best always,
Harry.

--- On Tue, 10/5/10, Justin McDonald wrote:


    From: Justin McDonald
    Subject: no gorund
    To: harry80020@yahoo.com
    Date: Tuesday, October 5, 2010, 6:45 PM

    My electrician is not grounding the panel box and no ground wires are going to the outlets what do I do, can i ground appliances individually, what about grounding outlets, help

    Justin

Offline harry80020

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Re: electricity in the Philippines
« Reply #49 on: October 14, 2010, 01:14:24 AM »
I forgot to mention this, thanks that I got a reminder from a friend named Terry:

One thing I would add to your article is that 110V surge suppressors don\'t work on the 220V
systems. I found this out when I absentmindedly plugged one in while in Russia. It did it\'s
job and blew as soon as I powered it up. Silly me. All I was really needing was a multi-
outlet extension for my equipment. What I got was a puff of smoke and no more power.

Offline barongoy

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Re: electricity in the Philippines
« Reply #50 on: November 09, 2010, 05:34:59 AM »

MODYFYING THE FILIPINO HOUSE CIRCUIT.
All one has to do to get 110 volts out of the Filipino system is add in the missing pieces – a neutral buss in the circuit breaker box, ground the neutral buss physically to the earth with a thick wire connected to a copper rod driven at least 18 inches into the soil, remove one of the hot wires running to the selected outlet and replace it with neutral wire from the neutral bus – viola, you have 110 volt service.  If you are going to install three-prong plugs, then you should also run a separate bare wire from the neutral bus to the third prong receptacle (for the round pin on the plug.)

Note that every 220 volt circuit you convert yields two 110 volt outlets, as a 110 volt outlet only has one circuit breaker and one hot wire to it.

If you are smart, you will also want to replace all your flat blade 220 volt outlets with the round pin European outlet.  Then you never have to ever worry about inadvertently plugging your 110 volt appliance into a 220 volt outlet and frying the appliance.

I hope this clears up the confusion.

[/quote]
My wife wants to have 110v for the entire house and a few 220v outlet? what would you suggest we do? BTW replacing the 220v flat blade outlet with the round pin European outlet is a wonderful idea.

Offline aerosick

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Re: electricity in the Philippines
« Reply #51 on: November 09, 2010, 05:42:28 AM »

MODYFYING THE FILIPINO HOUSE CIRCUIT.
All one has to do to get 110 volts out of the Filipino system is add in the missing pieces – a neutral buss in the circuit breaker box, ground the neutral buss physically to the earth with a thick wire connected to a copper rod driven at least 18 inches into the soil, remove one of the hot wires running to the selected outlet and replace it with neutral wire from the neutral bus – viola, you have 110 volt service. 
I hope this clears up the confusion.


Barongoy,

You\'re still missing the biggest piece: The ground on your transformer. You\'re relying on that copper rod stuck in the dirt to complete your circuit all the way back to where your 110 volt service originated: At the generator or the Sub-station.

Won\'t happen!!!

Billy
"We're here to preserve democracy, not practice it."

Gene Hackman: Crimson Tide ~ 1995

Offline barongoy

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Re: electricity in the Philippines
« Reply #52 on: November 10, 2010, 10:50:02 AM »
I see.

Some acquaintance have suggested that we have our own 15 or 25 Kva 110v transformer installed at the pole. Is that possible and how much do you think that would that cost?

Offline aerosick

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Re: electricity in the Philippines
« Reply #53 on: November 10, 2010, 12:04:33 PM »
I see.

Some acquaintance have suggested that we have our own 15 or 25 Kva 110v transformer installed at the pole. Is that possible and how much do you think that would that cost?

Quite a few have done this. You\'ll have to get the estimate from your Electric Provider\'s estimator.

Billy
"We're here to preserve democracy, not practice it."

Gene Hackman: Crimson Tide ~ 1995

Offline barongoy

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Re: electricity in the Philippines
« Reply #54 on: November 10, 2010, 02:28:34 PM »


I think we will do it that way; have a transformer installed at the pole and have 110v outlets in the house. It cost more but it will be good for the appliances.

Thank you.

Offline trevor

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Re: electricity in the Philippines
« Reply #55 on: November 16, 2010, 05:52:55 PM »
Barongoy, Where we live in north Luzon there is only a single phase (2 wire) 220 volts circuit. Actually it is not even 220ac but more like 190vac. There is no way you can add any ground to get 110vac. Yes if you have a three wire supply like what we have in the U.S.A. Two legs would read 220vac. ( above ground we call that). from any one of the above ground leg to the neutral or ground bare wire that would produce 110vac.
Adding a line transformer would not produce 110vac.  There line supply is not set up for that here in Neuva Vicaya where we live. Now i know that places like Baguio, Subic and Clarke where U.S. had military bases they have the three wire system like what we have in the U.S.
We recently had a transformer installed, 25kva. it cost us P60,000.00 for a reconditioned one. What it does is stabilize the supply voltage to our house. Now we have 228vac instead of190vac. Seems to help as all our neighbours lost there power in the recent typhoon but we did not.

Trevor
Never look down on anyone and always extend a helping hand. Tomorrow the role may be reverse.
Life is what you make it. Nothing to do with luck.

Offline aerosick

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Re: electricity in the Philippines
« Reply #56 on: November 16, 2010, 06:33:28 PM »
Barongoy, Where we live in north Luzon there is only a single phase (2 wire) 220 volts circuit. Actually it is not even 220ac but more like 190vac. There is no way you can add any ground to get 110vac. Yes if you have a three wire supply like what we have in the U.S.A. Two legs would read 220vac. ( above ground we call that). from any one of the above ground leg to the neutral or ground bare wire that would produce 110vac.
Adding a line transformer would not produce 110vac.  There line supply is not set up for that here in Neuva Vicaya where we live. Now i know that places like Baguio, Subic and Clarke where U.S. had military bases they have the three wire system like what we have in the U.S.
We recently had a transformer installed, 25kva. it cost us P60,000.00 for a reconditioned one. What it does is stabilize the supply voltage to our house. Now we have 228vac instead of190vac. Seems to help as all our neighbours lost there power in the recent typhoon but we did not.

Trevor

Trevor,

I should have been more area specific. Cebu is where I know of people having their Power Provider install a pole transformer just to serve them.

Barongoy never said where he lived. Barongoy, where do you live???

Billy
"We're here to preserve democracy, not practice it."

Gene Hackman: Crimson Tide ~ 1995

Offline barongoy

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Re: electricity in the Philippines
« Reply #57 on: November 25, 2010, 10:00:57 AM »
I am currently living in Dumaguete city, Negros Oriental. We are not sure yet we are going to build here or get a condo unit in Cebu City. Will there be problem in these places as far as getting the 110v?

Offline aerosick

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Re: electricity in the Philippines
« Reply #58 on: November 25, 2010, 12:14:46 PM »
I am currently living in Dumaguete city, Negros Oriental. We are not sure yet we are going to build here or get a condo unit in Cebu City. Will there be problem in these places as far as getting the 110v?

Where you want to buy property, walk out on the road and see their poles and transformers that are in place now. Look for the 3 insulated bushings on the side of the transformer. The center one is wired only when providing 110v.

Or go by your Service Provider\'s yard and look at the nameplate on the side of a transformer.

Billy
"We're here to preserve democracy, not practice it."

Gene Hackman: Crimson Tide ~ 1995

Offline aerosick

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Re: electricity in the Philippines
« Reply #59 on: November 25, 2010, 12:26:42 PM »
The transformer should look like this:

"We're here to preserve democracy, not practice it."

Gene Hackman: Crimson Tide ~ 1995