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Author Topic: Dome housing.  (Read 18714 times)

Offline coutts00

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Re: Dome housing.
« Reply #45 on: March 08, 2008, 01:46:14 PM »
I\'ll put up a post on the construction later, as to Gawad Kalinga, I spoke to their US representative before I left, their attitude was don\'t give us a better way to do it, just give us money and let us do our own thing.

Sort of depressing, it seems many are involved in building here and it is a big business. One I could certainly get involved in, but there seems to be a similar attitude to the US, if it wasn\'t invented here, we don\'t want it.

Take a look at slab tilt up construction, definitely a faster and cheaper method of construction for warehouses etc, but is not done here, cinder block is the way to go. I think attitudes here will change when it is suggested by a Filipino and not by a white guy.

Wayne
Wayne  ;D ;D

Offline philippinediver

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Re: Dome housing.
« Reply #46 on: March 08, 2008, 04:19:15 PM »
My Nephew Illac Diaz already is already heavily involved with Dome housing construction for the poor in the Philippines. Here are some links for him

Small | Large


A.
Small | Large

1. http://www.escalantecity.gov.ph/feb05.pdf
2. http://www.gadgetsmagazine.com/Content.aspx?CID=1658&PID=0&ID=198
3. http://www.microsoft.com/philippines/pressroom/0701_08.aspx

He is well connected, very popular here and a very nice person and a very smart young man.


Offline coutts00

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Re: Dome housing (Construction)
« Reply #47 on: March 08, 2008, 04:47:34 PM »
The Monolithic Eco-Shell

An EcoShell’s construction process is a modern adaptation of the building of the Pantheon and thousands of other domes, erected over the centuries. The ancients built them by piling mounds of earth or by creating large, false works of timber in the shape of a dome. They then covered these forms with brick, stone or a monolithic layer of concrete. Once the covering settled or set, they removed the forms.

Monolithic has substituted an inflatable Airform for the earth work or false work. To construct an EcoShell, concrete and rebar are placed on the outside of the Airform. (This differs from the construction of a Monolithic Dome; it calls for rebar and concrete on the inside of the Airform.)

EcoShells built for habitation in developing areas with desert-like or tropical climates are not insulated; nor do they usually need to be. But they may need roof coatings. Nevertheless, EcoShells make super-strong dwellings, impervious to fire, tornadoes, hurricanes, earthquakes, and termites. They can be built by native labor for a fraction of the cost of any comparable structure.


We estimated that a single Airform can be used to build more than a hundred buildings, thus making the cost of forming negligible. Because the EcoShell is a thin shell, its actual volume of concrete is very small -- far less than that used in conventional buildings (see table). The EcoShell is perfect for any type of building that doesn’t require insulation. (Note: In climates requiring insulation, the uninsulated EcoShell should not be substituted for an insulated Monolithic Dome.)

So, in economically developed nations, particularly those with temperate or cold climates, it’s ideal for garages, small warehouses, sheds, storage, grain storage, etc. -- but not housing. However, in developing countries with equatorial climates, EcoShells can provide suitable, practical and affordable housing. The EcoShell’s construction method has also been used to build bridges over small rivers and streams. We here at Monolithic think that its applications are virtually unlimited and that, in the future, more ideas for this construction procedure will be generated and implemented.

Monolithic EcoShells Solve World Housing Problems
The United Nations has determined that an average family habitation in developing areas needs to be about 28 square meters or 302 square feet. One EcoShell design, the EcoShell, fits that bill perfectly. The EcoShell has a diameter of 20 feet and a living area of approximately 314 square feet. Its construction, including the floor and dome shell, requires less than eight yards of reinforced concrete -- or 64 sacks of cement for a cost of about $320. The price of the aggregate will vary from place to place, but assuming that it’s about $10 per yard, that adds another $80. The 1,250 pounds of rebar will cost about $375. So the total cost of the materials for a EcoShell home, that will last for generations, is about $800. (Cost does not include labor, windows, doors, exterior coating, interior finishing.)

Monolithic EcoShell I -- How it\'s built

Monolithic has developed a booklet titled EcoShell I that illustrates and details the construction process, with sixty, captioned drawings. David said, “We already know that most workers -- even those who cannot read or speak English -- can catch on to how something must be done by studying this booklet\'s cartoon-like illustrations.” Some of those illustrations are reproduced in this article, at the end of this section. The booklet is available either as a download or purchase through the Monolithic Marketplace.

Construction of an EcoShell I begins with a small group of workers pouring a circular floor, to which the Airform is attached 2 inches in from the edge. The Airform is inflated with a small, high-pressure fan, such as fans used for heavy duty vacuum cleaners. After the Airform is inflated, rebar and then concrete are applied over its exterior.

The concrete can be mixed in a bucket or a fabric mixer and hand applied, or it can be mixed with commercial mixers and sprayed in place with Shotcrete equipment. This latter method obviously takes less manpower and at times produces better results. But the former method is also satisfactory and can be completed by inexperienced laborers.

Once the concrete sets, the Airform is removed.

When the EcoShell is to be used for bulk storage, the engineer must calculate the amount of side wall pressure and a corresponding increase in rebar must be added. In addition, there are several products available to add to the concrete mix that reduce cracking and increase concrete quality.

Since the EcoShell is generally not insulated, it won\'t be climate controlled, but its concrete does have some thermal value. And it can be covered with thatching, straw or dirt for insulation. Its roof can be coated with aluminized asphalt or a high grade exterior paint, preferably white to reflect heat. Recently we have added a layer of concrete that has polystyrene pellets, or vermiculite, or perlite added to it for insulation. Click here to see video explaining this process.: http://static.monolithic.com/dvd/regrind/index.html

While the EcoShell I has its advantages, it also has its limitations. For example, Monolithic does not recommend building an EcoShell I with a diameter of more than 40 feet (13m). Since men are working on top of an Airform there is always a risk to them of sudden collapse.

All things considered, the EcoShell is one of construction\'s strongest buildings. It is virtually impervious to fire, tornadoes and earthquakes. It is especially practical in countries lacking wood and steel. Most countries have concrete and rebar on hand. In general, using the same amount of cement, aggregate and rebar, three EcoShells can be built in place of one conventional, concrete structure.



Here are some captioned illustrations showing an EcoShell I\'s construction using a spray gun to apply Shotcrete.


EcoShell I starts as a steel reinforced concrete ring foundation/floor.
Vertical steel bars embedded in the ring are attached to the steel reinforcing of the dome itself.
 


After the Airform is spread and fastened to the floor, it must be sealed to prevent air leakage.


Using blower fans, the Airform is inflated.
This creates the dome shape of the structure.



Rebar is placed, spaced per engineering.
Verticals go against the Airform; horizontals go on the outside.
Additional plywood frames for doors and windows can be set
against the inflated Airform. Remove from inside after concrete sets.

One inch of Shotcrete is applied to the exterior of the Airform,
allowed to set, then re-coated to finish. (Concrete can be hand applied with a trowel.)



Remove Airform after the concrete is set.
Wire brush the rebar on the inside to remove any loose material,
then spray .5 to .75 inches of concrete on the inside surface.

Now that the shell is finished, hang doors, windows and vents.
The EcoShell can be used as is or it may be roof-coated --
preferably white to reflect heat.


The whole file can be downloaded here, it is approx. 2.77mb

http://static.monolithic.com/pdfs/ecoshell.pdf

Wayne
Wayne  ;D ;D

Offline coutts00

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Re: Dome housing.
« Reply #48 on: March 08, 2008, 04:49:59 PM »
My Nephew Illac Diaz already is already heavily involved with Dome housing construction for the poor in the Philippines. Here are some links for him

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OhEg4q58MwE

A. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OhEg4q58MwE
1. http://www.escalantecity.gov.ph/feb05.pdf
2. http://www.gadgetsmagazine.com/Content.aspx?CID=1658&PID=0&ID=198
3. http://www.microsoft.com/philippines/pressroom/0701_08.aspx

He is well connected, very popular here and a very nice person and a very smart young man.




I find that very interesting, I have tried on numerous occasions by email to contact him and have not had any reply. Maybe you could forward to him my email and we could get together on this, I have already reviewed his work, and find it very interesting.

Wayne
Wayne  ;D ;D

Offline sgtflyfisher

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Re: Dome housing.
« Reply #49 on: March 10, 2008, 09:05:06 AM »
Had the same expericnce when I tried to email few years ago. Would be interested if you ever touch base with him... All throgh the previous posts I was asking myself \"havent they heard about EB const?\"

Jeff

Offline philippinediver

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Re: Dome housing.
« Reply #50 on: March 10, 2008, 02:04:06 PM »
Sorry Guys,

Just spoke to Illac\'s mom and Illac is currently doing his Ph.d Thesis at Harvard and is consummed. She sais he has maybe 3 hours of sleep a night which I believe. Last time I saw him was this past Christmas at the family party and he seemed to be in outer space with so many things to do and so little time. I think once he finishes which should be by this summer he will have time to catch up on things. But knowing him as I do there is no guarranty. There is a chance he may go to work with the UN and then it\'s anyones guess. It is a shame because he ws starting to do good things here with the Dome for residentail and schools. I only hope he returns back to that.

Offline coutts00

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Re: Dome housing.
« Reply #51 on: March 10, 2008, 02:26:43 PM »
Maybe he could put some of us in touch with some of the people is is working with here, so we could help as well.

Wayne
Wayne  ;D ;D

Offline philippinediver

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Re: Dome housing.
« Reply #52 on: March 10, 2008, 02:49:45 PM »
Was wondering if any of you guys on this board and living here in the Philippines with direct experience building a quality house here might consider coming over to Davao for about a year to supervise the building my house. I am also considering putting up two (2) Dome houses for guest houses(if the prices that were  posted for this are correct) . If not, perhaps you can refer me to others that might be interested. Of course I will pay a salary and provide housing. Probably for one year. Great vacation from the wife ha ha ha.  I am also thinking about starting a company run by expats to service the higher standars of building that expats are use to but not finding here.

Please don\'t get the idea that I am some frivilous rich guy. I am simply someone that wants to get something that seems to be hard to get. A quality house for a fair price. Without help I will end up with a poorly constructed house that will cost me much more to keep maintained.

Also, This will not be a job but an adventure

thanks


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Re: Dome housing.
« Reply #53 on: March 10, 2008, 03:16:33 PM »


Dressed with that nipa roof,things are looking much better..(and cooler too)



From an aesthetic point of view that one is intreresting.....apart from the low profile dome the rest are just plain fugly.

Fred\'s pic is inline with my thoughts on a cement central core with wrap around deck on 2nd floor shading the central structure. My decking would be twice as wide as one pictured tho\'
This makes central core acts as a heat sink and also stimulates wind flow reducing cooling costs.

Offline fred

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Re: Dome housing.
« Reply #54 on: March 11, 2008, 11:37:33 AM »
Was wondering if any of you guys on this board and living here in the Philippines with direct experience building a quality house here might consider coming over to Davao for about a year to supervise the building my house. I am also considering putting up two (2) Dome houses for guest houses(if the prices that were  posted for this are correct) . If not, perhaps you can refer me to others that might be interested. Of course I will pay a salary and provide housing. Probably for one year. Great vacation from the wife ha ha ha.  I am also thinking about starting a company run by expats to service the higher standars of building that expats are use to but not finding here.

Please don\'t get the idea that I am some frivilous rich guy. I am simply someone that wants to get something that seems to be hard to get. A quality house for a fair price. Without help I will end up with a poorly constructed house that will cost me much more to keep maintained.

Also, This will not be a job but an adventure





thanks




Its a shame you are not building closer to our location as I would be happy to help if I could..
We know a great team of builders and an engineer from Bulacan that work in and around Manila..
They are not always available as they are usually  busy.
I have to say that our project went like a dream..
I think it went this way for us because  one family member used to work for a local architect and picked up many local contacts from his time there.
He would never apply for or sign anything in regards building permits etc without the appropriate contact with him in person.
Although no money changed hands he always went in with at least 3 kilo`s of fresh prawns..
My bro/in law also knows just about everything there is to know about local construction methods and managed everything with a hands on approach. He canvassed and sourced all materials himself and established really good relationships with the suppliers.
If a different municipal engineer came to the site asking questions they were always referred back to the head engineer in municipal hall...
If any of them ever saw my face I believe that things would have gone differently..
It is my belief that if you hire a foreigner to manage the job,your project will be the talk of the town..Not a good idea here..
You will have officials around like bees around a honey pot.
Be wary of that kind of thing if I were you.
I wish you the very best of luck with your building.