Author Topic: Building in the Philippines  (Read 11479 times)

Offline BoBHofmans

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Building in the Philippines
« Reply #30 on: February 06, 2008, 08:43:08 PM »

3.   Pay a daily rate rather than a contracted price. Contracted will lead to rushed & shoddy work. Daily rate does mean watching them as they will try to make the job last. Example. We just had the exterior of the house painted. 2 x painters at Php350 an hour. Took 7 days plus paint/materials at Php50k. Total inc bonus (worth paying to keep on target) just over Php11k. A contractor quoted inc materials Php35k.



Php 350 per hour? My wife asks if you were painting in Makati!
Here in Barangay Cugman, Cagayan de Oro City, my foreman makes 350 per day, his masons/carpenters/electricians 250 per day, and the common helpers 170 to 180 Php per day.
Before you ask: this foreman is very very good, uncle of my wife, church member and trusted, never drinks and doesn\'t play cards, something that can really screw up your building plans. The boys sometimes have a beer on payday, the pm before their day off - I might even spring for 2 big San Migs - that\'s all. 


Bob
Dutchman, married to Ethel, cutest Pinay
7 summer months working 24/7 at the Costa Brava, Spain
5 wintermonths relaxing & building houses in CDO City

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Re: Building in the Philippines
« Reply #31 on: February 06, 2008, 08:54:53 PM »
Whoops!  :o Ya got me on that one. Should have been Php350 a DAY! At per hour I would set myself up in business :D

Hi Bob,

Too slow on the per hour mate!  ;)Already put my hands up to that little slip of the typing finger ::) Looks like you got things of the ground there in CDO. Give us an intro to you & yours on the \'Meet your neighbors\" board.

Offline BoBHofmans

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Building in the Philippines
« Reply #32 on: February 07, 2008, 08:34:49 AM »

And most of all do not hire any one that is related to your wife or a friend of the family to do the job

Tom


Hey Tom, you scare me. In my message posted above I proudly explain that my current foreman is an uncle of my wife.
He built my first house in the winter of 2005-2006 and I was quite happy with him, his style, his behavioir and his work.
The next winter, 2006-2007, I wanted to build an extension for my in-laws to the new house. \"Papa Susing\", as the uncle is called, was working on another project and we took some guy from the neighbourhood. I wanted a smallish extension, bedroom, small kitchen, CR, with a flat, concrete roof. He did that well enough, although some columns give a crooked impression and when it rains, it also rains in the CR. The foreman got 300 a day and was always complaining that he was short. The word \"Cash Advance\" was in his daily vocubalary. Sometimes he showed up late or not at all with \"LBM\" as the usual excuse. Then I heard from his son, who got irritated with Daddy, that he had been playing cards and drinking and got home at 5 in the morning!
What p-ed me off most was that he drank his Christmas bonus and didn\'t work for a week or so. The helpers suffer as well, financially, because they can\'t work without their foreman.
In february 2007 the extension was finished and he started doing the ground work at a lot at the seafront we had just bought. In March 2007 we had to go back to Spain to work, which in hindsight is very fortunate. Half of the columns he built are crooked.
When we came back last October \"Papa Susing\" took over again and the job goes splendid. He had to build another wall along the firewall of last year\'s forman and some connections between new and old columns aren\'t too great, but I\'ll have to live with that.
I trust the uncle in as far that I don\'t think, or cannot imagine, hat he mixes cement badly or sells some of our materials to \"the highest bidder\" or whatever, exactly because he\'s family. He or my father in law or a jack-of-all-trades (cousin) kind of \"male au-pair\" sleep at the beach (construction site), so there\'s always somebody there.
So why should I \"above all not take anybody related to my wife\"? You must have had some bad experiences. I can imagine that a relative could take it easy simply because he\'s family and thinks he can get away with it. This has also happened and the guy is fired by my father-in-law sometimes even before I realize there was something wrong.



CDO, December 2007, preparing for the roofing of the ground floor.
Bob
Dutchman, married to Ethel, cutest Pinay
7 summer months working 24/7 at the Costa Brava, Spain
5 wintermonths relaxing & building houses in CDO City

Offline BoBHofmans

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Building in the Philippines
« Reply #33 on: February 07, 2008, 09:24:03 AM »
@ Keith, sorry, I didn\'t see your rectification till later. 350 a day is more like it.
BTW, this site reads like a new history book, almanac, websters or so. I flip back and forth and try to take in a year\'s writing in 5 minutes.
So, I react to a remark just as I read it, not necessarily in chronological order!
Bob
Bob
Dutchman, married to Ethel, cutest Pinay
7 summer months working 24/7 at the Costa Brava, Spain
5 wintermonths relaxing & building houses in CDO City

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Re: Building in the Philippines
« Reply #34 on: February 07, 2008, 10:10:13 AM »
Scared you! Maybe I should have put a PG RATING on the post ! Good to hear that you are happy with your experiences with your family members.

I have 6 Brother in Laws and when I started my business here ( I\'m not retired ) I thought it would be a good idea to employ them as none of them had a job of the 30 employees I have the only ones I have had problems with were the Brother in Laws.

To date only one  still works for for me the rest have all since retired to sitting under the coconut trees.

The brother in laws were always laying back, not showing up for work and if working they would not pulling there fair share they seemed to enjoy standing around and watching everyone else work. If I said anything to them it started a family discussion more like a Feud which included-the father in law, the mother in law and all of the wives.

My wife was always caught in the middle so after dealing with these family problems for about 8 months  I realized no family employed no problems .

Tom

The in laws were the only real problems I have had with employees in the 7 years I have ran the business the rest of the workers and are happy to show up for work everyday.

The Brother in Laws seemed to resent the fact that they needed to work for a paycheck this has been my experience your experiences may vary

You are very lucky that you have some one from your wifes family that you can trust but believe me it is a rarity here many of my expat friends have their own horror stories to tell aout dealing with the local family

Enjoy your life here

Best Regards

Tom


Offline Rick

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Re: Building in the Philippines
« Reply #35 on: February 23, 2008, 12:28:20 PM »
   I did not use any inlaws in the home building process but for other things such as
yard work, cutting down trees, helping erect fences, all we hire are relatives and never had
any problem with them. Hope my luck holds.

Rick

Offline coutts00

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Re: Building in the Philippines
« Reply #36 on: February 23, 2008, 12:59:29 PM »
For my 2 Centavos worth,

What I am seeing here is the generation gap, the uncles, father-inlaw etc, are from a generation when there was no OFW money flowing into the family. Their work and hence their self worth came from the job they had done and the quality of their workmanship.

The younger brother inlaws seem to have the mentality that why should I work for you when I can just ask your asawa/my sister for money or have my wife do it. The self worth ethic seems no longer valid in this generation. I have noticed in our family the sisters of my asawa are the best workers, working in our store, always on time, overtime never charged for, and insulted if I try to pay it.

Their husbands are another thing entirely, except for one, who whenever he is not intoxicated works very well, except until he saw a power saw, then the hand saw was outdated and always coming to me, could he use it. I hand him the handsaw, and say he needs to lose a few pounds.

My wifes uncle, who is the last of the breed, if we call him to work and we pay for the fare, will travel from the distant reaches of Catanduanes, from a tiny village, in the deepest jungle, over 10 jeepneys, a ferry and a couple of buses to come work for us, his work is first rate, he is an old craftsman, jack of all trades, master of none.

Why buy a new door he says he will just make one, sure enough 2 hrs later, some wood, a handsaw and some nails, and we have a new door. Strong, Sturdy and built to last. Cheaper and better quality than I could buy anywhere and straight as an arrow.

So I think it is not the relationship of the worker, but the age and pride in oneself that determines how well the work is done and the behavior of the worker.

Wayne
Wayne  ;D ;D

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Re: Building in the Philippines
« Reply #37 on: February 23, 2008, 03:16:29 PM »
For my 2 Centavos worth,

What I am seeing here is the generation gap, the uncles, father-inlaw etc, are from a generation when there was no OFW money flowing into the family. Their work and hence their self worth came from the job they had done and the quality of their workmanship.

The younger brother inlaws seem to have the mentality that why should I work for you when I can just ask your asawa/my sister for money or have my wife do it. The self worth ethic seems no longer valid in this generation. I have noticed in our family the sisters of my asawa are the best workers, working in our store, always on time, overtime never charged for, and insulted if I try to pay it.

Their husbands are another thing entirely, except for one, who whenever he is not intoxicated works very well, except until he saw a power saw, then the hand saw was outdated and always coming to me, could he use it. I hand him the handsaw, and say he needs to lose a few pounds.

My wifes uncle, who is the last of the breed, if we call him to work and we pay for the fare, will travel from the distant reaches of Catanduanes, from a tiny village, in the deepest jungle, over 10 jeepneys, a ferry and a couple of buses to come work for us, his work is first rate, he is an old craftsman, jack of all trades, master of none.

Why buy a new door he says he will just make one, sure enough 2 hrs later, some wood, a handsaw and some nails, and we have a new door. Strong, Sturdy and built to last. Cheaper and better quality than I could buy anywhere and straight as an arrow.

So I think it is not the relationship of the worker, but the age and pride in oneself that determines how well the work is done and the behavior of the worker.

Wayne

Will he travel as far as Bohol?  ;)

Offline coutts00

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Re: Building in the Philippines
« Reply #38 on: February 23, 2008, 04:40:27 PM »
I am sure he would, is retired now and his only income is from a small sari store.

Wayne
Wayne  ;D ;D

Offline philippinediver

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Re: Building in the Philippines
« Reply #39 on: March 08, 2008, 09:49:41 AM »
I am inspired by what I am reading in this forum about Building in the Philippines, the many challenges it brings to us expats and some of the practical solutions offered here. I too am planning to build my dream retirement house and I would like to pursue my dream in a manner even more practical to my situation. This can result in something that may be of interest to some readers here in the forum or others thay may know.

For one thing, I have absolutely no desire to become a watchdog on my own building project. I have neither the patience nor experience to know what I should be looking for in the building process. I am here to enjoy life and coupled with some major medical challenges and temperament issues I have, a construction site is the last place I should be. In this regard I have an idea that may be of interest.

Too the point I would like to find an expat with building expertise that might be interested in overseeing my personal building project. Perhaps there are some here that are bored with the daily routine and might seek some challenges, additional income and a possible business opportunity in the end if all goes well.

The project would probably take upwards of a year and will be quite challenging and large. The end result will hopefully be a model that future building projects can be compared against. I know for a fact there are many expats in the same boat as I am totally frustrated by the lack of expertise and enthusiasm for building by the local building companies where all that is missing is proper guidance by an expereinced supervisor builder.

The opportunity side of a successful outcome could be the launching of a construction company that will provide this expertise, security and peace of mind to other expats seeking to build their own dream house wherever they might be in the Philippines. I would provide what is needed to launch such a company.

Anyone interested in a further dialogue should please contact me directly.

sincerely

Vic