Author Topic: solar tech  (Read 4901 times)

Offline RUFUS

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solar tech
« on: March 21, 2008, 10:41:25 AM »
Anybody using solar technologies, or thinking of doing a solar retrofit to your homes?

RUFUS
SO SAYETH THE RUFUS

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Re: solar tech
« Reply #1 on: March 21, 2008, 12:00:27 PM »
Anybody using solar technologies, or thinking of doing a solar retrofit to your homes?

RUFUS

When I eventually get my house built here, I will most certainly include solar technology. The first thing will be a solar water heater, then some deep cycle batteries, initially charged from the mains as a backup for brownouts. Later I will charge them from solar panels. I also want to experiment with solar chimneys as air extractors, initially on a BBQ to see how well they work.

Colin

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Re: solar tech
« Reply #2 on: March 26, 2008, 08:50:13 AM »
The other day I spent some hours on Yahoo Philippine search for solar. I found most site was out of the Country except Shell, the oil company, that does a lot of solar work in the Philippines for those off grid.

What I didn\'t find was prices for the equipment. Apparently, what is wanted is to design what you need and then give a price???

Personally, I don\'t think we can afford the layout for a whole house system up front? I\'m thinking of lighting and a 12v system would work. I haven\'t seen any 12v RV lights around these parts yet.
B-Ray

Offline RUFUS

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Re: solar tech
« Reply #3 on: March 26, 2008, 10:50:43 AM »
!2v is the way to go for a cheap backup system of lighting. There are some nice low consumption/high output LED\'s out now that are very brite. I think one could sprinkle those throughout the house on a toggle with a few deep cycle batteries charged from a small windmill or solar panel, even a dinky trickle charger. Even a couple of ambient power modules running 24/7 could trickle charge a few NiCads for some free juice.
Now depending on where one lives, a nice windmill/solar combo could easily power all the things in a nipa hut a growing boy needs...
SO SAYETH THE RUFUS

Offline Gray Wolf

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Re: solar tech
« Reply #4 on: March 29, 2008, 06:39:41 AM »
And for those lucky enough to have running water in the form of a small stream, small hydroelectric units are available as well.
Louisville, KY USA - Bagong Silang, Caloocan City, PH

Offline RUFUS

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Re: solar tech
« Reply #5 on: March 29, 2008, 02:23:26 PM »
The bad thing about hydro is you need a good amount of fall to get descent pressure to turn a turbine. Otherwise you would have to use a wheel which may/may not give enough torque to do the job. I love the idea of hydro power but finding property with a good drop could prove difficult. One could always get permission from a friendly neighbor to run some pipe across their land. The idea of a big wheel or Rube Goldberg contraption is not appealing to me.
SO SAYETH THE RUFUS

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Re: solar tech
« Reply #6 on: March 29, 2008, 03:10:49 PM »
The bad thing about hydro is you need a good amount of fall to get descent pressure to turn a turbine. Otherwise you would have to use a wheel which may/may not give enough torque to do the job. I love the idea of hydro power but finding property with a good drop could prove difficult. One could always get permission from a friendly neighbor to run some pipe across their land. The idea of a big wheel or Rube Goldberg contraption is not appealing to me.

That depends upon what you consider \"good amount\".  We\'ve done some work with the Department of Forestry a few years ago and if memory serves, we found that a 3\' fall required about 20 gallons of water per minute to keep a small turban producing about 2 amps at 12 VDC.  Finding a reliable source of water flowing year round on your property may be a larger problem in the RP, but it will produce around the clock regardless of day or night if it\'s available.

Offline coutts00

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Re: solar tech
« Reply #7 on: March 29, 2008, 03:34:22 PM »
Just a thought, but the higher the voltage of the generator / alternator the lower the loss over distance. You may actually want to output in AC which has less line loss and rectify it at your battery to charge it. Otherwise you will need to invest in high gauge copper wires preferably solid, to carry your output with the least amount of line loss.

If the creek runs right by the house its no issue, but if it is 50 yrds away, you could have a large amount of loss. Also wind here is sparse in places, you may get 5 knots and you may get nothing. Solar is the way to go, last time I checked there was a company run by a foreigner in La Union that is doing solar installations here in PI.

I think it is a business with high market potential, but also requires large capital investment. Solar panels are not cheap. Then you also have to look at tracking apparatus to track the sun and give the cells the best exposure at all times, also a backup diesel generator for times when it is cloudy, the creek has run dry and there is no wind.

There is a company in India that makes simple single cylinder diesels, air cooled about 5hp, perfect for turning an alternator or generator for 48v dc.

Wayne
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Re: solar tech
« Reply #8 on: April 01, 2008, 07:42:46 AM »
The English \"Lester\" 1 banger is a proven diesel engine over many decades.  We used them back in the 60\'s to run refer units on U.S. fishing boats out of California.

If the, (10?), Asean Countries would get together  on making  \"SOLAR\" affordable, they all would be better off, IMO!

Solar has come to the point that it doesn\'t need just the sun, but light too will work at least for low voltage.
B-Ray

Offline imtheredrum

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Re: solar tech
« Reply #9 on: September 05, 2008, 12:29:29 AM »
Thanks for the info... because I will be using solar panels and a wind mill to generate my own electricity and my \"usage\" will be very low or even reversing the current... and I understand that will be paid to me by the electric company.  Unless of course I am wrong about that  ???
..                                \ \ \ | / / /
..                                  ( @ @~)
Jeff & Ritz  -----o00o-(. .)-o00o-----

Offline coutts00

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Re: solar tech
« Reply #10 on: September 05, 2008, 02:57:31 AM »
I think you will find that occurs only in the U.S. also you will need a lot of solar coverage, and a windmill capable of generating at least 3500watts in a 15 knot breeze to be able to free yourself from paying for power. I don\'t believe they have the reversing power meters here, at the moment you don\'t even have peak and off peak options unless you are using 10,000 kw per month over the last 12 months, when they finally role it out to residential customers you will be needing to use 1000kw per month over 12 months to get the option of peak and off peak, and you will still have to pay upwards of P2500 for the meter plus installation.
Wayne  ;D ;D

Offline imtheredrum

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Re: solar tech
« Reply #11 on: September 05, 2008, 03:24:33 AM »
I think you will find that occurs only in the U.S. also you will need a lot of solar coverage, and a windmill capable of generating at least 3500watts in a 15 knot breeze to be able to free yourself from paying for power. I don\'t believe they have the reversing power meters here, at the moment you don\'t even have peak and off peak options unless you are using 10,000 kw per month over the last 12 months, when they finally role it out to residential customers you will be needing to use 1000kw per month over 12 months to get the option of peak and off peak, and you will still have to pay upwards of P2500 for the meter plus installation.


I will try to find the website in the PI that talks about the use of solar power, and I will be mostly solar and I will plan for the windmill if the costs can justify it\'s use. You can now build your own solar panels a lot cheaper now... I know you are one to do your research very thoroughly so here are some links...http://www.altensol.com.ph/solar_energy_philippines.php; http://www.wn.com/philippinesenergy; http://www.alibaba.com/countrysearch/PH/Philippines.html; http://www.solarbuzz.com/CompanyListings/Philippines.html; http://energy.sourceguides.com/businesses/byGeo/byC/Philippines/byP/solar/solar.html; http://solarenergy.net/
..                                \ \ \ | / / /
..                                  ( @ @~)
Jeff & Ritz  -----o00o-(. .)-o00o-----

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Re: solar tech
« Reply #12 on: September 05, 2008, 10:28:33 AM »
I think you will find that occurs only in the U.S. also you will need a lot of solar coverage, and a windmill capable of generating at least 3500watts in a 15 knot breeze to be able to free yourself from paying for power. I don\'t believe they have the reversing power meters here, at the moment you don\'t even have peak and off peak options unless you are using 10,000 kw per month over the last 12 months, when they finally role it out to residential customers you will be needing to use 1000kw per month over 12 months to get the option of peak and off peak, and you will still have to pay upwards of P2500 for the meter plus installation.


I will try to find the website in the PI that talks about the use of solar power, and I will be mostly solar and I will plan for the windmill if the costs can justify it\'s use. You can now build your own solar panels a lot cheaper now... I know you are one to do your research very thoroughly so here are some links...http://www.altensol.com.ph/solar_energy_philippines.php; http://www.wn.com/philippinesenergy; http://www.alibaba.com/countrysearch/PH/Philippines.html; http://www.solarbuzz.com/CompanyListings/Philippines.html; http://energy.sourceguides.com/businesses/byGeo/byC/Philippines/byP/solar/solar.html; http://solarenergy.net/


Here are a few of the websites from the many I have bookmarked over the years.

http://www.homepower.com/home/
http://www.khmersolar.com/
http://www.motherearthnews.com/
http://www.builditsolar.com/
http://www.solarcooking.org/
http://www.i4at.org/surv/sstill.htm
http://www.solarnavigator.net/electric_trike_rickshaw.htm

Here is an interesting Philippine development
http://www.bidnetwork.org/artefact-50178-en.html

Colin

Offline lwood

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Re: solar tech
« Reply #13 on: September 16, 2008, 07:58:41 PM »
And for those lucky enough to have running water in the form of a small stream, small hydroelectric units are available as well.
do you have a source for a small water turbine? I do have a water source adjacent to my property.  I have a source in manila that has done an estimate on installing a ram pump coupled with a water turbine.  He says you need about 3 meters of fall in order to run the ram pump and or the turbine.  That fall agrees with most literature I have read.  I can give out the source if somebody wants it.  His ram pump has been written up in Ag Mag.  The pump itself is only 10,000 pesos.  I haven\'t done anything yet cause I need to get water rights to the water first.

Offline Gray Wolf

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Re: solar tech
« Reply #14 on: September 21, 2008, 12:43:06 PM »
And for those lucky enough to have running water in the form of a small stream, small hydroelectric units are available as well.

do you have a source for a small water turbine? I do have a water source adjacent to my property.  I have a source in manila that has done an estimate on installing a ram pump coupled with a water turbine.  He says you need about 3 meters of fall in order to run the ram pump and or the turbine.  That fall agrees with most literature I have read.  I can give out the source if somebody wants it.  His ram pump has been written up in Ag Mag.  The pump itself is only 10,000 pesos.  I haven\'t done anything yet cause I need to get water rights to the water first.


No local source yet, but here are some interesting links to gain a lot more info on small hydro units.

This first link has two very large PDF downloads that have 296 pages of info on hydro power. 

Guide on How to Develop a Small Hydropower Plant

http://www.doradovista.com/DV_Hydro_Power.html

******
This link has some very good info on home-sized units but shipping will be a problem.  I included it for the great info this gentleman offers

Source for Pico-Hydro, Micro-Hydro, and Mini-Hydro Turbines & Accessories

http://www.hydro-turbines.com/

*******
Micro hydro power generator

http://www.absak.com/design/hydro.html

I\'ll continue my research and will post any new info I come up with for all to share.
Louisville, KY USA - Bagong Silang, Caloocan City, PH