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Author Topic: Security at Home  (Read 24422 times)

Offline HappyBee

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Security at Home
« on: June 24, 2017, 03:22:58 PM »
Just wondering what you feel is needed security wise for our homes? Applies to people living in metro areas as well as in the provinces.

Please don't share personal security information if it could put you at risk in any way.
^^ Just my personal opinion... take it or leave it!

Offline jjcabgou

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Re: Security at Home
« Reply #1 on: June 24, 2017, 06:21:38 PM »
that is a broad question, and it boils down to many factors.   Location, are you near a lot of drugs and crime?  are you looking at living in a gated community?  Is the security solid in the gated community, some have very strong security, and some the guards get paid to wave anybody in.   There are so many factors.
I live in a gated community and we do not take any extra security precautions at all.   There are many in the neighborhood that leave their doors unlocked when going to the store or to eat. 
Additionally much of it may depend on how you carry yourself.   Flash money and expensive jewelry around all the time and that may make you a target regardless of where you are.... or act like a total asshole to the locals, and you may be wishing you had more security...   

Offline lost_in_samoa

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Re: Security at Home
« Reply #2 on: June 24, 2017, 07:21:51 PM »
1.) Stop thinking like a victim.  Develop the mind set that you are going to fight if forced to.  Sooner or later some a__hole will oblige you.  Visualize and think about an attack against your person. That way if it ever does happen you won't freeze up with panic.

2.) Dress like the neighborhood.  Its the little things that catch attention.  Earrings that you think are modest may give off the "bling - bling" air.  My wife is proud of the fact that her cell phone is a Blackberry from a decade ago.  Pickpockets have offered to give her a phone.

I work a lot so my clothes are always full of holes and stained.  People come to beg from me and I can honestly show them that the only thing I have in my pocket is a hole.  Eat like the neighborhood.  That way you smell like everyone else.  Once again it is the small things.

3.) Develop situational awareness.  Search the Internet.  There are plenty of sites that have small games/tests to help you develop this facility.  Plan so that you are never alone.  Have competent people around.  When I say competent, I mean paying attention to the world and not distracted by the results of last night's game show.

4.) Arm yourself and your family.  Train until you develop muscle memory.  I am not necessarily speaking of fire-arms.  Though they are the ultimate equalizer.  In example,  both my Wife and Daughter carry sprays.  Which are readily available here.  They have practiced with the cannisters enough to be able to use them under stress. 

Take up a martial science.  I box.  The wife does Yoga/Taekwondo.  My daughter teaches Muy-Thai.

5.)  Start working on fortifying your house.  Window grills.  Stronger doors.  Security screen doors.  Simple security systems can be had for cheap these days.  But stay away from the fancy kits.  Simple is robust.  Robust is secure.

Animals can be useful.  Only if properly trained.  Outside dogs can be poisoned.  A well trained inside dog is better than any electronic system on the market.

Store up a bit of supplies.  You live in the 11th most disaster prone nation on the Earth.  Only common sense to have a few extra kilo's of rice/ligo and some bottled water.

6.)  Pro-actively avoid trouble.  Here is an example. I have a few relatives that drink. When I retired, I went to the elders in the family first.  Talked to them and made it clear that I wanted no trouble from anyone. 

A few days later my brother in law showed up drunk.  I firmly showed him to the door.  He went back to his home and started talking trash about us.  Until his Lolo told him to shut up and sit down.  Now they only come around when they are sober and everyone benefits.


Hope this helps.

Offline M.C.A.

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Re: Security at Home
« Reply #3 on: June 24, 2017, 09:30:45 PM »
Nothing like a dog that's tied up as an early warning system... their hearing is second to none and you will be alerted.  I'd have barred windows and steel doors, concrete roof, main gates and gates to your entrances but don't totally block out the view from your neighbors, you'll want witnesses and if your walls or gates are a complete block out nobody will see or hear you in a bad happening.
My views would be from someone who lives out in the province close to in-laws on a pension.  Norwegian and French heritage.

Offline David690

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Re: Security at Home
« Reply #4 on: June 24, 2017, 11:53:06 PM »
1.) Stop thinking like a victim.  Develop the mind set that you are going to fight if forced to.  Sooner or later some a__hole will oblige you.  Visualize and think about an attack against your person. That way if it ever does happen you won't freeze up with panic.

2.) Dress like the neighborhood.  Its the little things that catch attention.  Earrings that you think are modest may give off the "bling - bling" air.  My wife is proud of the fact that her cell phone is a Blackberry from a decade ago.  Pickpockets have offered to give her a phone.

I work a lot so my clothes are always full of holes and stained.  People come to beg from me and I can honestly show them that the only thing I have in my pocket is a hole.  Eat like the neighborhood.  That way you smell like everyone else.  Once again it is the small things.

3.) Develop situational awareness.  Search the Internet.  There are plenty of sites that have small games/tests to help you develop this facility.  Plan so that you are never alone.  Have competent people around.  When I say competent, I mean paying attention to the world and not distracted by the results of last night's game show.

4.) Arm yourself and your family.  Train until you develop muscle memory.  I am not necessarily speaking of fire-arms.  Though they are the ultimate equalizer.  In example,  both my Wife and Daughter carry sprays.  Which are readily available here.  They have practiced with the cannisters enough to be able to use them under stress. 

Take up a martial science.  I box.  The wife does Yoga/Taekwondo.  My daughter teaches Muy-Thai.

5.)  Start working on fortifying your house.  Window grills.  Stronger doors.  Security screen doors.  Simple security systems can be had for cheap these days.  But stay away from the fancy kits.  Simple is robust.  Robust is secure.

Animals can be useful.  Only if properly trained.  Outside dogs can be poisoned.  A well trained inside dog is better than any electronic system on the market.

Store up a bit of supplies.  You live in the 11th most disaster prone nation on the Earth.  Only common sense to have a few extra kilo's of rice/ligo and some bottled water.

6.)  Pro-actively avoid trouble.  Here is an example. I have a few relatives that drink. When I retired, I went to the elders in the family first.  Talked to them and made it clear that I wanted no trouble from anyone. 

A few days later my brother in law showed up drunk.  I firmly showed him to the door.  He went back to his home and started talking trash about us.  Until his Lolo told him to shut up and sit down.  Now they only come around when they are sober and everyone benefits.


Hope this helps.

Well if that lot doesn't put anybody off living here I don't know what will...!!  Take up a martial art, are you kidding?  Where do you live?
Londoner at heart

Offline lost_in_samoa

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Re: Security at Home
« Reply #5 on: June 25, 2017, 04:38:41 AM »
Well if that lot doesn't put anybody off living here I don't know what will...!!  Take up a martial art, are you kidding?  Where do you live?


That's pretty much boilerplate advice. 

Be aware of, and prepare for, the darker side of reality.  Which is the same the world over. 

I wonder how many people in Marawi are wishing they had  seen this coming, were in better health, or had a bit of rice and fish?


Offline jjcabgou

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Re: Security at Home
« Reply #6 on: June 25, 2017, 11:00:40 AM »
1.) Stop thinking like a victim.  Develop the mind set that you are going to fight if forced to.  Sooner or later some a__hole will oblige you.  Visualize and think about an attack against your person. That way if it ever does happen you won't freeze up with panic.

2.) Dress like the neighborhood.  Its the little things that catch attention.  Earrings that you think are modest may give off the "bling - bling" air.  My wife is proud of the fact that her cell phone is a Blackberry from a decade ago.  Pickpockets have offered to give her a phone.

I work a lot so my clothes are always full of holes and stained.  People come to beg from me and I can honestly show them that the only thing I have in my pocket is a hole.  Eat like the neighborhood.  That way you smell like everyone else.  Once again it is the small things.

3.) Develop situational awareness.  Search the Internet.  There are plenty of sites that have small games/tests to help you develop this facility.  Plan so that you are never alone.  Have competent people around.  When I say competent, I mean paying attention to the world and not distracted by the results of last night's game show.

4.) Arm yourself and your family.  Train until you develop muscle memory.  I am not necessarily speaking of fire-arms.  Though they are the ultimate equalizer.  In example,  both my Wife and Daughter carry sprays.  Which are readily available here.  They have practiced with the cannisters enough to be able to use them under stress. 

Take up a martial science.  I box.  The wife does Yoga/Taekwondo.  My daughter teaches Muy-Thai.

5.)  Start working on fortifying your house.  Window grills.  Stronger doors.  Security screen doors.  Simple security systems can be had for cheap these days.  But stay away from the fancy kits.  Simple is robust.  Robust is secure.

Animals can be useful.  Only if properly trained.  Outside dogs can be poisoned.  A well trained inside dog is better than any electronic system on the market.

Store up a bit of supplies.  You live in the 11th most disaster prone nation on the Earth.  Only common sense to have a few extra kilo's of rice/ligo and some bottled water.

6.)  Pro-actively avoid trouble.  Here is an example. I have a few relatives that drink. When I retired, I went to the elders in the family first.  Talked to them and made it clear that I wanted no trouble from anyone. 

A few days later my brother in law showed up drunk.  I firmly showed him to the door.  He went back to his home and started talking trash about us.  Until his Lolo told him to shut up and sit down.  Now they only come around when they are sober and everyone benefits.


Hope this helps.
Holy crap.   Dont forget your flak vest and kevlar.   Not sure anybody would want to live here after reading that.   Do you live in Marawi? 

Offline balutsky

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Re: Security at Home
« Reply #7 on: June 25, 2017, 11:42:43 AM »
Just wondering what you feel is needed security wise for our homes? Applies to people living in metro areas as well as in the provinces.

Please don't share personal security information if it could put you at risk in any way.

CCTV, CCTV and more CCTV.  If you have a maid, install CCTV inside your home and always lock the doors where you store your valuables.  Do not trust your maid.  A lot of maids are in connivance with thieves and undesirables.  Otherwise not to be paranoid too much on security.  if you get along with the locals they will look after you.  Don't be an ass and you will be fine.  "You reap what you sow"

Offline suzukig1

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Re: Security at Home
« Reply #8 on: June 25, 2017, 11:50:33 AM »
We have many dogs.  It's common to hear stories about houses getting robbed in the PHL but it's almost always houses that don't have dogs.

Also, we usually have someone at home.  When everyone is gone on vacation we get someone to house sit.  The only time no one is at the house is when we all go out to dinner.  But the dogs are always there.

No other special security precautions.  We don't even have bars on the windows.  We live in a middle class to upper middle class PHL neighborhood.  Everyone owns there home and half the people have relatively new cars.

I have been living in the PHL full time since 2007.  No incidents so far.

Offline lost_in_samoa

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Re: Security at Home
« Reply #9 on: June 25, 2017, 12:30:36 PM »
Holy crap.   Dont forget your flak vest and kevlar.   Not sure anybody would want to live here after reading that.   Do you live in Marawi?

I didn't forget.  Just don't recommend that to beginners.

 ;)


No I don't live down south.  But I could.


Offline JD

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Re: Security at Home
« Reply #10 on: June 25, 2017, 02:01:46 PM »
I have a sniper on my roof and spike-filled trenches along my walls.

Oh, and the patio is mined.

Offline HappyBee

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Re: Security at Home
« Reply #11 on: June 25, 2017, 02:51:09 PM »
1.) Stop thinking like a victim.  Develop the mind set that you are going to fight if forced to.  Sooner or later some a__hole will oblige you.  Visualize and think about an attack against your person. That way if it ever does happen you won't freeze up with panic.

2.) Dress like the neighborhood.  Its the little things that catch attention.  Earrings that you think are modest may give off the "bling - bling" air.  My wife is proud of the fact that her cell phone is a Blackberry from a decade ago.  Pickpockets have offered to give her a phone.

I work a lot so my clothes are always full of holes and stained.  People come to beg from me and I can honestly show them that the only thing I have in my pocket is a hole.  Eat like the neighborhood.  That way you smell like everyone else.  Once again it is the small things.

3.) Develop situational awareness.  Search the Internet.  There are plenty of sites that have small games/tests to help you develop this facility.  Plan so that you are never alone.  Have competent people around.  When I say competent, I mean paying attention to the world and not distracted by the results of last night's game show.

4.) Arm yourself and your family.  Train until you develop muscle memory.  I am not necessarily speaking of fire-arms.  Though they are the ultimate equalizer.  In example,  both my Wife and Daughter carry sprays.  Which are readily available here.  They have practiced with the cannisters enough to be able to use them under stress. 

Take up a martial science.  I box.  The wife does Yoga/Taekwondo.  My daughter teaches Muy-Thai.

5.)  Start working on fortifying your house.  Window grills.  Stronger doors.  Security screen doors.  Simple security systems can be had for cheap these days.  But stay away from the fancy kits.  Simple is robust.  Robust is secure.

Animals can be useful.  Only if properly trained.  Outside dogs can be poisoned.  A well trained inside dog is better than any electronic system on the market.

Store up a bit of supplies.  You live in the 11th most disaster prone nation on the Earth.  Only common sense to have a few extra kilo's of rice/ligo and some bottled water.

6.)  Pro-actively avoid trouble.  Here is an example. I have a few relatives that drink. When I retired, I went to the elders in the family first.  Talked to them and made it clear that I wanted no trouble from anyone. 

A few days later my brother in law showed up drunk.  I firmly showed him to the door.  He went back to his home and started talking trash about us.  Until his Lolo told him to shut up and sit down.  Now they only come around when they are sober and everyone benefits.


Hope this helps.

Honestly I think there are some good points in here.

I probably won't take up a martial art, but being in shape couldn't hurt. Storing supplies and not rubbing people up the wrong way are good ideas too.
^^ Just my personal opinion... take it or leave it!

Offline HappyBee

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Re: Security at Home
« Reply #12 on: June 25, 2017, 02:55:34 PM »
Nothing like a dog that's tied up as an early warning system... their hearing is second to none and you will be alerted.  I'd have barred windows and steel doors, concrete roof, main gates and gates to your entrances but don't totally block out the view from your neighbors, you'll want witnesses and if your walls or gates are a complete block out nobody will see or hear you in a bad happening.

I'm interested in the concrete roof idea. The problem is qualified masons are hard to get, and I would want it to hold up in an earthquake  :-\
^^ Just my personal opinion... take it or leave it!

Offline lost_in_samoa

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Re: Security at Home
« Reply #13 on: June 25, 2017, 03:24:12 PM »
I'm interested in the concrete roof idea.

I am sad to say that I can't help much with roofs.  I live in a dome.

What I will say is that the title Mason here is ....... uhmmmm .... loosely applied. 

So Caveat Emptor.

A lot of the users here have built.  Go through the construction posts.   Makes for hilarious reading.

Offline M.C.A.

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Re: Security at Home
« Reply #14 on: June 25, 2017, 03:45:00 PM »
I'm interested in the concrete roof idea. The problem is qualified masons are hard to get, and I would want it to hold up in an earthquake  :-\


Happybee it's gonna be a wake up call our first super typhoon and it's at that point a concrete roof makes sense, you won't have trouble finding anyone who can build a roof let alone a 2nd floor concrete flooring, they are pretty much the same, you'll want to be involved in the process, and you wouldn't believe how dangerous looking concrete houses and condo's look like before they put the finishing touches, buying a home already built is earthquake scary.  I wouldn't want any maid in our house, lessons learned and I can do my own dishes, I'd put those bars on the windows, actually, you can have your windows made rather cheaply with bars, we had several HUGE windows made for our home.  Here's a link to what the concrete roof should look like. http://tinyurl.com/ybxrveko
« Last Edit: June 25, 2017, 05:48:46 PM by Lee2 »
My views would be from someone who lives out in the province close to in-laws on a pension.  Norwegian and French heritage.