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Author Topic: Security at Home  (Read 24094 times)

Offline jjcabgou

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Re: Security at Home
« Reply #15 on: June 25, 2017, 04:00:59 PM »
Honestly I think there are some good points in here.

I probably won't take up a martial art, but being in shape couldn't hurt. Storing supplies and not rubbing people up the wrong way are good ideas too.
storing supplies for security purposes?  I guess if you are expecting an apocalypse?    All joking aside much of it depends on where you live and how you carry yourself.   Based on how some people live here, I am surprised they would want to live here.  Personally I would not want to live in a place I thought my life was threatened, and or I was worried about the safety of my family.  Who the hell would "choose" to live in a place like that.   I have been coming here for more than 25 years, and have lived here for 5 years, and as somebody else stated, I have not had any problems at all.   I travel by myself all the time, whether its going to the store or market, driving down to Manila or Sta Rosa etc...   I try to maintain situational awareness, but that is just ingrained in my DNA, and it is not more acute living in the Philippines.   If you are planning on living in Tondo, Jolo island etc. then I would be concerned on a daily basis.   But, again, why would somebody want to live here if they thought their safety or the safety of their family was an ongoing daily concern?   Be smart, choose a decent area, dont mingle with drug addicts, don't venture into places with "undesirable" people, and dont walk thru tondo dangling a rolex....   That advice applies to anywhere on this planet.

Offline David690

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Re: Security at Home
« Reply #16 on: June 25, 2017, 05:35:03 PM »
storing supplies for security purposes?  I guess if you are expecting an apocalypse?    All joking aside much of it depends on where you live and how you carry yourself.   Based on how some people live here, I am surprised they would want to live here.  Personally I would not want to live in a place I thought my life was threatened, and or I was worried about the safety of my family.  Who the hell would "choose" to live in a place like that.   I have been coming here for more than 25 years, and have lived here for 5 years, and as somebody else stated, I have not had any problems at all.   I travel by myself all the time, whether its going to the store or market, driving down to Manila or Sta Rosa etc...   I try to maintain situational awareness, but that is just ingrained in my DNA, and it is not more acute living in the Philippines.   If you are planning on living in Tondo, Jolo island etc. then I would be concerned on a daily basis.   But, again, why would somebody want to live here if they thought their safety or the safety of their family was an ongoing daily concern?   Be smart, choose a decent area, dont mingle with drug addicts, don't venture into places with "undesirable" people, and dont walk thru tondo dangling a rolex....   That advice applies to anywhere on this planet.
Yup, that some up my way of thinking also.
« Last Edit: June 25, 2017, 05:51:23 PM by Lee2 »
Londoner at heart

Offline JoeLP

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Re: Security at Home
« Reply #17 on: June 25, 2017, 05:50:29 PM »
I am sad to say that I can't help much with roofs.  I live in a dome.

What I will say is that the title Mason here is ....... uhmmmm .... loosely applied. 

So Caveat Emptor.

A lot of the users here have built.  Go through the construction posts.   Makes for hilarious reading.

All the cement roofs I have seen built here are really just cement floors put on top of the top level of the home.  I have seen 3 of them being built.  And 2 of them the owners actually use as a patio with chairs and tables and all that bru-ha-ha going on when the things are finished. 

Draw back?  They are only good for about an hour a day because they are not shaded or protected.  I guess if you lighted them they would be good for longer as you could use them after dark.  But the ones I see the man uses it to drink his coffee in the morning and once in a while around sunset they'll come out and sit at one of their tables.  They live "behind" our compound and have plans to add lighting so it's more usable.  But for now not that much of an investment.

The other two are just down the street and are neighbors.  The one set it up and also uses it sparingly while the other just set it up with some extra reinforcements and put his water tank up there.

But there were all built in the same fashion of beams connected from the side columns at the side of the house with a cement pad poured over the beams using forms between the beams.  The one that has the water tank had an extra set of columns run from the bottom level up 3 levels to the roof and put and extra beam between the 2 normal beams.

So...if you're happy with a "floor" design being used as your roof....that's always and option.
In the land of the blind, the one eyed man is king.

Offline David690

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Re: Security at Home
« Reply #18 on: June 25, 2017, 07:27:23 PM »
Yup, that sums up my way of thinking also.
Londoner at heart

Offline HappyBee

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Re: Security at Home
« Reply #19 on: June 25, 2017, 08:30:31 PM »
Happybee it's gonna be a wake up call our first super typhoon and it's at that point a concrete roof makes sense, you won't have trouble finding anyone who can build a roof let alone a 2nd floor concrete flooring, they are pretty much the same, you'll want to be involved in the process, and you wouldn't believe how dangerous looking concrete houses and condo's look like before they put the finishing touches, buying a home already built is earthquake scary.  I wouldn't want any maid in our house, lessons learned and I can do my own dishes, I'd put those bars on the windows, actually, you can have your windows made rather cheaply with bars, we had several HUGE windows made for our home.  Here's a link to what the concrete roof should look like. http://tinyurl.com/ybxrveko


Yes, having a concrete roof during a typhoon would be much less nerve-racking. Thanks for the link!
^^ Just my personal opinion... take it or leave it!

Offline M.C.A.

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Re: Security at Home
« Reply #20 on: June 26, 2017, 02:16:54 PM »
HappyBee here's another recent link on violence in those so called safe private neighborhoods, the owner didn't have bars on his windows or steel doors, they busted down his glass window door, this happened 3 days ago, the family allowed to live but American shot in the head, he didn't make it.

I feel I've done my duty as a fellow expat to warn others to put bars on your windows and steel doors, the other entry would be the from the roof, real easy to compromise if made out of any other roofing other than concrete.  These guys scaled the fence walls so those weren't much good either other than for show, barbwire and the works should be in place.  Gee what happened to those underpaid gate guards...they always disappear and they'll have a great story to tell on that.

 http://news.mb.com.ph/2017/06/23/3-suspects-in-us-traders-murder-jailed-in-cavite/
My views would be from someone who lives out in the province close to in-laws on a pension.  Norwegian and French heritage.

Offline JD

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Re: Security at Home
« Reply #21 on: June 26, 2017, 02:48:50 PM »
We have an 8-foot wall topped with pointy angle bars in front. Our main gate is barred across the center and has independent rebar bolts that drop into the concrete drive. The side walls are 4 feet of wall with 4-foot pointy angle bars. The rear wall is 10-feet topped with barbed wire. Our windows are all barred (tastefully) on the inside. We have a dog. We have some CCTV.

Critically, we chose Davao to live in because of its reputation as a safer place. I'm sure there is a lot of petty crime here but there's fewer big crimes (murder, carjacking, etc.). I don't even hear of the Jeepney bag cutters here like there are in some cities.

I lived in an unsecured, planned neighborhood not far from here while we built this house. There were loud parties in the street on occasion, but no one ever hacked to death in a drunken rage. I think the people here are just different to a certain degree.

Offline HappyBee

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Re: Security at Home
« Reply #22 on: June 26, 2017, 05:31:20 PM »
storing supplies for security purposes?  I guess if you are expecting an apocalypse?    All joking aside much of it depends on where you live and how you carry yourself.   Based on how some people live here, I am surprised they would want to live here.  Personally I would not want to live in a place I thought my life was threatened, and or I was worried about the safety of my family.  Who the hell would "choose" to live in a place like that.   I have been coming here for more than 25 years, and have lived here for 5 years, and as somebody else stated, I have not had any problems at all.   I travel by myself all the time, whether its going to the store or market, driving down to Manila or Sta Rosa etc...   I try to maintain situational awareness, but that is just ingrained in my DNA, and it is not more acute living in the Philippines.   If you are planning on living in Tondo, Jolo island etc. then I would be concerned on a daily basis.   But, again, why would somebody want to live here if they thought their safety or the safety of their family was an ongoing daily concern?   Be smart, choose a decent area, dont mingle with drug addicts, don't venture into places with "undesirable" people, and dont walk thru tondo dangling a rolex....   That advice applies to anywhere on this planet.

To illustrate the fact that having some food supplies can be a good idea, I once lived in a place that was suddenly cut off by flooding... the flood didn't dissipate for about a month. It was at least a week before people were able to invent ways of getting across the water. Eventually delivery trucks were able to get through, but if this was a smaller town and the stores weren't so well stocked we might have been going hungry for a while. I have heard of other barangays where this has happened and people basically survived on what they had in the house or on the farm.

If a big typhoon is coming I usually stock up on the basics in case the stores run out of stock afterwards, in the event that stocks can't be delivered. But to have them on hand in case of a sudden natural disaster like a big earthquake or I guess tsunami, could be something we might be thankful we did afterwards. Depends on where one lives I guess.

As for not wanting to live in an unsafe area... definitely true. The only thing is sometimes us Kanos don't get the full story before we buy land or build a house somewhere... also security situations can change and I guess Marawi is a case in point.
^^ Just my personal opinion... take it or leave it!

Offline M.C.A.

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Re: Security at Home
« Reply #23 on: June 26, 2017, 05:40:07 PM »
We have an 8-foot wall topped with pointy angle bars in front. Our main gate is barred across the center and has independent rebar bolts that drop into the concrete drive. The side walls are 4 feet of wall with 4-foot pointy angle bars. The rear wall is 10-feet topped with barbed wire. Our windows are all barred (tastefully) on the inside. We have a dog. We have some CCTV.

Critically, we chose Davao to live in because of its reputation as a safer place. I'm sure there is a lot of petty crime here but there's fewer big crimes (murder, carjacking, etc.). I don't even hear of the Jeepney bag cutters here like there are in some cities.

I lived in an unsecured, planned neighborhood not far from here while we built this house. There were loud parties in the street on occasion, but no one ever hacked to death in a drunken rage. I think the people here are just different to a certain degree.

JD that wall sounds awesome... and the same with your barred windows also the fact that you are in a planned neighborhood and not a private community, I think you'll be alright.   :)
My views would be from someone who lives out in the province close to in-laws on a pension.  Norwegian and French heritage.

Offline lost_in_samoa

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Re: Security at Home
« Reply #24 on: June 26, 2017, 06:13:12 PM »
food supplies

I look at it this way.  For 7 thousand years or so of recorded history, humans have been storing food in a variety of different methods.  All with the same goal in mind.  To keep the butt at a minimum diameter.  Which should be every sane person's bottom line goal.

Most of the bizarre stuff we consume evolved from a preservation method.  Cheese, bagoong, kambucha, kimchi, pickles, toyu, salami.  People didn't just say one day,  "Hey lets take this cabbage, coat it with hot peppers and vinegar and bury it in the ground for a year.  Then eat it.  Boy that sounds good!

We've only had refrigeration on a mass scale for 70 years or so.  What data set are you gonna rely on? Seven millennium or seven decades.  A person would be foolish to ignore all that hard earned experience in favor of what the marketing team from Mc-JollyBee says.

Personally we are fortunate.  My sweetie picked up the habit of canning from the older ladies on my side of the family.  It's her hobby now.  This week she put back 15 quarts of pena in light syrup.   Every time there is a sale on something at the wet market she makes a run at it.   As a result our food expenses are negligible.  We have a large family and a lot of workers.

We have also found that pressure canning transforms foods that are almost inedible into staples. Water buffalo for example.   Normally it is only fit for shoe and tire repair.  But after it is processed into the jar it tastes very much like canned beef.  I believe the Brits call it " Bully Beef".

Sorry I digress.  It just makes me sad on a fundamental level to see what masquerades as wisdom these days.

Offline jjcabgou

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Re: Security at Home
« Reply #25 on: June 26, 2017, 06:22:20 PM »
I look at it this way.  For 7 thousand years or so of recorded history, humans have been storing food in a variety of different methods.  All with the same goal in mind.  To keep the butt at a minimum diameter.  Which should be every sane person's bottom line goal.

Most of the bizarre stuff we consume evolved from a preservation method.  Cheese, bagoong, kambucha, kimchi, pickles, toyu, salami.  People didn't just say one day,  "Hey lets take this cabbage, coat it with hot peppers and vinegar and bury it in the ground for a year.  Then eat it.  Boy that sounds good!

We've only had refrigeration on a mass scale for 70 years or so.  What data set are you gonna rely on? Seven millennium or seven decades.  A person would be foolish to ignore all that hard earned experience in favor of what the marketing team from Mc-JollyBee says.

Personally we are fortunate.  My sweetie picked up the habit of canning from the older ladies on my side of the family.  It's her hobby now.  This week she put back 15 quarts of pena in light syrup.   Every time there is a sale on something at the wet market she makes a run at it.   As a result our food expenses are negligible.  We have a large family and a lot of workers.

We have also found that pressure canning transforms foods that are almost inedible into staples. Water buffalo for example.   Normally it is only fit for shoe and tire repair.  But after it is processed into the jar it tastes very much like canned beef.  I believe the Brits call it " Bully Beef".

Sorry I digress.  It just makes me sad on a fundamental level to see what masquerades as wisdom these days.

You had me until the last sentence.   Regarding "wisdom" I guess my bad, I did not connect the dots to the initial "Security" question to storing grub.   I did not believe, and still dont, that the intent was other than security.   Having said that, what you are doing is actually pretty cool, and more people should do things such as that for a variety of reasons.  The most important one that comes to mind is, you know exactly what you are putting in your body, free from chemicals, pesticides, and the other bazaar things that get into our food.

Offline lost_in_samoa

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Re: Security at Home
« Reply #26 on: June 26, 2017, 06:56:15 PM »
I guess my bad

I was not targeting anybody.  So no need to apologize.  I do appreciate the sentiment though.  Thank you. 

I was just waxing melancholic.

Offline FastWalk

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Re: Security at Home
« Reply #27 on: June 26, 2017, 10:59:40 PM »
+1 on the concrete roof idea,  for lots of reasons.

Yolanda(super typhoon 2013 ) took our attic (that is now a concrete roof) at our beach house.  Suggest to use steel decking under the concrete.  The link from M.C.A looks really good.  But use the steel decking under it.  Make sure to have a stairs to the roof.  Then can have a waiting shed there to protect from the rain or sun.  The roof access of course needs a locked secure door also.

If a storm takes the roof,  then no security at all until fixed..

Remember, today is the tomorrow you worried about yesterday.

Offline JD

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Re: Security at Home
« Reply #28 on: June 27, 2017, 11:25:30 AM »
JD that wall sounds awesome... and the same with your barred windows also the fact that you are in a planned neighborhood and not a private community, I think you'll be alright.   :)

Oh, we're not in a planned community anymore. We lived in one while we built. We're just off a secondary road, on land that was owned by our neighbor's parents. The large parcel was subdivided for family members and our 768sqm lot changed hands a couple of times. The title was clear, though.

Offline JD

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Re: Security at Home
« Reply #29 on: June 27, 2017, 11:33:26 AM »
To illustrate the fact that having some food supplies can be a good idea, I once lived in a place that was suddenly cut off by flooding... the flood didn't dissipate for about a month. It was at least a week before people were able to invent ways of getting across the water. Eventually delivery trucks were able to get through, but if this was a smaller town and the stores weren't so well stocked we might have been going hungry for a while. I have heard of other barangays where this has happened and people basically survived on what they had in the house or on the farm.

After the Nisqually (Washington State) quake in 2000, I began keeping a store of food and water in our condo in Seattle. Seemed prudent. Although we're not in the typhoon path down here in Davao, we're at the mercy of earthquakes like everyone else. It seems prudent to keep extra canned good and such on hand in case the SHTF. Eventually, it probably will.