Philippines Insider" The Ultimate Philippines Travel Guide for Tourists and Expats

Author Topic: Prep yer self Expats.  (Read 1270 times)

Offline MotorSarge

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MS

Offline Steve & Myrlita

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Re: Prep yer self Expats.
« Reply #1 on: March 30, 2020, 05:56:28 AM »
As of yesterday afternoon, Bacolod City is now on full lock down.
Thank you...God Bless...
Bro Steve & Sis Myrlita
Bacolod City, PH
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Offline M.C.A.

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Re: Prep yer self Expats.
« Reply #2 on: March 31, 2020, 05:23:39 PM »
I'm in Laguna and it's full lock down... I did some panic shopping early but now I don't want to bother with all the passes to get outside our municipality but dang...  The products left over in our main grocery store PureGold, all the good stuff taken daily like those individually wrapped cakes and cookies, crackers and never any bread but today I managed to get one loaf of bread, before nobody seemed buy the bread unless it was a BOGO, so I'm glad limits were set on bread so I'll make my daily two hour max outing count each and every day.             
My views would be from someone who lives out in the province close to in-laws on a pension.  Norwegian and French heritage.

Offline JoeLP

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Re: Prep yer self Expats.
« Reply #3 on: March 31, 2020, 08:14:21 PM »
Northern Samar is on heightened quarantine.  I'm lucky because of Tina.  Between her being the market manager(market is still open) and her catering business being the biggest around(the mayor personally called her and asked her to take up the government contract of supplying meals to all the checkpoints every day for the workers at them) she can still get around pretty much untouched with a special pass that her and a few of her workers all have.  So she can still get to wherever she wants to buy things, including our food and such with very little difficulty or issues. 

I took a small walk today(my long walks are no longer allowed) and it feels a little surreal.  Curfew ends here in the morning around 6-7(depends on how those keeping watch feel pretty much) and my walks always start at 5 am.  So far, they still allow it, but I can no longer cross the airport runway(it runs through the middle of our municipality) to the other side where I normally walk.  But man, the streets are so damn empty.  The "mini market" that runs every morning about 2 blocks from my house still happens, but there's hardly nothing at it as far as supply being sold or customers to buy it.  The streets are just so still and quiet.  Usually I'm just one of many walkers even at that time in the morning. 

I do get stopped, but being one of a few white men and Tina's cousin being a former pulis department chief(now head of security for the mayor) and also Tina's connection to the government officials mixed with her being one of about 4 pinay in our municipality married to a foreigner is a very nice benefit for me.  They know who I am if by nothing more Tina's reputation.  So, while the security at the runway crossing deny me the ability to cross it, the rest of the security forces here are allowing my walks, but only in the "eastern side" of the municipality. 

The private hospital here(Catarman Doctor's) is not allowing many patients.  My niece wasn't feeling well and he was taken there.  They refused to allow her entry because of the possibility that she might have covid 19 and it was late night and none of the doctors that have to give approval of admittance were there.  Crazy.  A hospital acting that way.  On the way to the provincial hospital she started feeling better and they brought her home in hope that what was affecting her wasn't covid 19.  Seems they got lucky.  Still, a hospital denying entry for a sick person?  And this is the best hospital around.  Far better than the other few. 

Every night at 7 the siren sounds to start curfew and the streets are just crazy empty unless you have a pass.  It hits home when all the sari saris are shut down.  At first some stayed open later but then the pulis ended that inside of a few days.  Now if you go out, and see nothing open, and no one on the streets, it's a weird feeling.  We have one of the longest running and largest sari saris around as a neighbor to a side, as well as a large net cafe across the street and then another very large beverage vendor/dealer just down a few homes across the street that are usually all busy until 11pm/midnight and now all of them are shut down at 7. 

Feels like the USA again.  Always grew up in neighborhoods that were very residential with not commercial areas around so quiet areas.  But, after nearly 7 years of the "noise" of living here, this quiet is unsettling. 

Anyone else getting that feeling?  I guess if you live in a gated community you might not feel it as much.  But living in the downtown area, I am feeling it and feeling it well.
In the land of the blind, the one eyed man is king.

Offline clarkee

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Re: Prep yer self Expats.
« Reply #4 on: April 01, 2020, 03:29:39 AM »
Good luck to you Joel!  Lived in Angeles in 2000 and made it nearly a year.  Been to the PI many times in the 90's.  Was contemplating on giving it another go on a SRRV.  All my recollections tell me don't do it!! Too many unknowns and way too much drama on just daily living. Where I live in the US the overall cost of living is cheaper than the PI.  Will visit for a few months a year but living there, can't see it happening.

Offline JoeLP

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Re: Prep yer self Expats.
« Reply #5 on: April 01, 2020, 07:39:43 AM »
Good luck to you Joel!  Lived in Angeles in 2000 and made it nearly a year.  Been to the PI many times in the 90's.  Was contemplating on giving it another go on a SRRV.  All my recollections tell me don't do it!! Too many unknowns and way too much drama on just daily living. Where I live in the US the overall cost of living is cheaper than the PI.  Will visit for a few months a year but living there, can't see it happening.
Thanks Clarkee. 

I love it here.  Yeah, to each his own.  I get it.  But, I was not that big of a fan of moving here permanently myself when I made the move back in 2013 and I had more than a few outs if it went in a direction that I didn't like.  The COL wasn't an issue for me.  So, I didn't really focus on it.  I figured that if I lived in a more rural area that over all the costs would be the same.  I lived in cities and in rural towns growing up and as an adult in the USA and in all reality, they cost close to the same.  Be it high election in the rural areas and more gas in the vehicles to get around that counter the cheaper mortgage/rent or what have you. 
All that said, I was wrong.  I was planning on at least $1500/month being required.  At least.  We still keep it easily under $1000/mo.  That's with 3 kids with all of them(up to last month) in private schools(one just graduated high school, college time now).
 
And the drama here is just the culture.  To me, not any worse than what I faced in the USA.  Just different.  There's no damn "safe spaces" or that modern spoiled brat kids junk here that is being faced in the USA.  None of the "BLM" or "Antifa" crap.  See the "drama" everywhere, just different depending on where you live.

They are talking locally now of opening up each home to getting 2 "passes" so that 2 people can leave the house at the same time.  The mayor is trying to get permission for that in the next few weeks or something.  I don't get into the local politics to really understand the system.  But it makes me laugh.  It's more symbolic than anything if it happens.  The market is about 1/2 full.  Anyone selling non-essential items has been shut down already.  Those who sell rice and other items are struggling to get supplies, so even a chunk of them are down.  The mall only has open the "supermarket" with everything else in the mall, including the department store above the supermarket all shut down.  There's really no reason for more than one person leaving the house for the average person.  But, this is drama I get and can understand and live with.  And until then, I'm cool with the 1 pass per home except for certain circumstances(like Tina with her special passes to get to the checkpoints and deliver the meals each shift of each day). 

This is just something that is a "once in a lifetime" experience that feels surreal at times.  Sorta what I was getting at in my first post.  We'll make it through.  A cure and/or vaccine will be out soon enough and if you play it safe the chances are high that everything works out and most will be good to go.  But still, between what started about a month ago and will happen till we reach that "safe point" is going to be an experience that is not going to be forgotten, if for no other reason that it is so far away from what is "normal" in life. 

That all said, hope everyone on here is playing it safe.  Taking it careful and doing what they can to live as normal of a life as possible while keeping themselves and their family safe.  These times will pass, but until they do, play it smart.
In the land of the blind, the one eyed man is king.

Offline lost_in_samoa

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Re: Prep yer self Expats.
« Reply #6 on: April 01, 2020, 08:23:42 AM »
This is just something that is a "once in a lifetime" experience that feels surreal at times.

If you break down the Chinese language pictograph for disaster/crisis it has a core bit of drawing that represents opportunity.  Just a little trivia there.

This whole debacle is affecting us but not in the way that most think.  It has drawn us much closer to each other.  I suspect that might be true for a lot of folks out there.   We should all be thankful for that.


When the barangay gives us supplies, (so far its been just a few kilo's of rice),  we send that to the extended family in the next township.

I have been fabricating tiny little 20 liter anaerobic digesters like crazy.  Make them out of bottles, buckets, and other containers that folks give us or we scrounge.

We have been giving those "fertilizer factories" to neighbors along with planters pre-seeded with pechay, camote, red lettuce, and a few other gulay/pising types that grow fast.

We hope to help folks supplement their rice, up the vitamin intake to boost immune systems, and ease people into the idea of veranda gardening.   So far they are a big hit.   The first neighbor will harvest his first crop of pechay next week.

I hope that everyone affected by this mess, and that is pretty much the whole world,  learns that long supply chains are more dangerous than the current pathogen de-jure.   We really need to localize the production of our essential needs.

Just thinkin while grinding away at it.


Offline jjcabgou

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Re: Prep yer self Expats.
« Reply #7 on: April 01, 2020, 11:34:51 AM »
If you break down the Chinese language pictograph for disaster/crisis it has a core bit of drawing that represents opportunity.  Just a little trivia there.

This whole debacle is affecting us but not in the way that most think.  It has drawn us much closer to each other.  I suspect that might be true for a lot of folks out there.   We should all be thankful for that.


When the barangay gives us supplies, (so far its been just a few kilo's of rice),  we send that to the extended family in the next township.

I have been fabricating tiny little 20 liter anaerobic digesters like crazy.  Make them out of bottles, buckets, and other containers that folks give us or we scrounge.

We have been giving those "fertilizer factories" to neighbors along with planters pre-seeded with pechay, camote, red lettuce, and a few other gulay/pising types that grow fast.

We hope to help folks supplement their rice, up the vitamin intake to boost immune systems, and ease people into the idea of veranda gardening.   So far they are a big hit.   The first neighbor will harvest his first crop of pechay next week.

I hope that everyone affected by this mess, and that is pretty much the whole world,  learns that long supply chains are more dangerous than the current pathogen de-jure.   We really need to localize the production of our essential needs.

Just thinkin while grinding away at it.
You are a good man!!!

Offline lost_in_samoa

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Re: Prep yer self Expats.
« Reply #8 on: April 01, 2020, 12:32:08 PM »
You are a good man!!!

Thank you for the praise.  I don't get much of that.  I appreciate it.

Truth be known,  In an earlier life I was a bad man.  A very bad man.   

Now a days I just try earn a little peace by helping out.

Offline MotorSarge

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Re: Prep yer self Expats.
« Reply #9 on: April 21, 2020, 08:30:28 AM »
Lets hear some good news from out there...here Moma cooked up some huge crabs, long beans, onions & thick Lecche...I think I slept/snored at least a good 6 hours.
MS

Offline fred

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Re: Prep yer self Expats.
« Reply #10 on: April 21, 2020, 08:59:08 AM »
When they announced the alcohol ban I went out with my pass and panic bought 20 kilo`s of Brown sugar 2 Kilo`s of fresh ginger and 10 Kilos of ripe banana and mangoes.
At the moment I have 20 gallons of my local beer brew bubbling away.
I drank a gallon last week and I estimate the Alc, content about the same as Red horse..
Just filled a 5 gallon water jug from the primary ferment but with double the sugar..Target Alcohol, 15%.. Not too shabby!
Lovin the lock down!

Offline lost_in_samoa

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Re: Prep yer self Expats.
« Reply #11 on: April 21, 2020, 05:31:41 PM »
Lets hear some good news from out there...

Here is my Anaerobic Digester.  I finished building it about a week before the CCP virus started molesting bat munchers.  This is bacteria farming.

This particular one cost me about 12Kphp to build.  It took me a week to build it.  I do not count that time as work.  It was entertainment.

I feed it a 30 liter bucket full of anything that will decompose once a day.  In return it gives me 6 hours of cooking gas for a single 5" burner on full blast flame.  It also gives me 30 liters of nutrient.  Daily.  No smell, no flies, but you do have to seal up good or you will get mosquitoes.

The effluent is concentrated so we dilute it 1:3 effluent:water for soil applications, 1:10 for aero/hydro ponics. For soil planters we get 90 liters of fertilizer each and every day.

I've been making versions of this sized at 20 liters for all of my neighbors.  That size seems to fit the weight of table/kitchen scraps plus pet wastes they have available.   They bring me a container that is airtight and I build it up.  If they have any waste pvc pipe or tubing I scrounge that for the build.  The bit -n- pieces, valves, sealant, and etc.  I provide.

A 20 liter unit is fed .6 of a liter,  and produces .6L of effluent each day. .  Which dilutes out to 1.8L of soil fertilizer.  Each day.  You feed plants with this stuff once or twice a week.  So a 20L digester will easily support 20 or 30 small tree sized planters.

One of my neighbors had a big stock of old cement / rice sacks.  He has been sharing those out.  Another neighbor has a bakery.  He gives out all of his waste now.   Some have shown me where they are gathering all of the fallen Mango / Papaya / Macopa fruits to feed.

Now we are surrounded on all 4 sides by compounds and families growing their own stuff.  We take the time to talk and teach.  I've visited each family close to me that has one of these and made sure they they know how to make it themselves.   I tell them to pay it forward.

Everybody I talk to agrees that trading counterfeit paper for faulty sh_t fabricated by slaves thousands of miles away is no way to organize a world.

So yeah there is a silver lining to all of this. 

Offline MotorSarge

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Re: Prep yer self Expats.
« Reply #12 on: April 22, 2020, 12:40:52 AM »
That is quite a build right there and very good on the recycling end.
That needs to be incorporated everywhere in PI.
MS

Offline Bob Johnson

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Re: Prep yer self Expats.
« Reply #13 on: April 22, 2020, 04:27:45 AM »
Very impressive!

Offline lost_in_samoa

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Re: Prep yer self Expats.
« Reply #14 on: April 24, 2020, 01:31:21 PM »
That is quite a build right there and very good on the recycling end. That needs to be incorporated everywhere in PI.

Very impressive!

Thank y'all.  I appreciate it.

I know that me posting about A.D. is a retread, and some of the old timers are groaning "Not this Sh_t again".  I did not post for praise.  I'm leading by example.

So you crusty old farts ..... vacuum the Frosted flakes of'n your belly .... and post.  Preferably with a pic or two.  Tell a good story.

And if nothing good has happened recently? .....  I suggest y'all un-ass the Lazyboy  and make something occur.  Then tell us about it.

I will continue posting about farming this or building that ..... why?  It is what I find interesting.  If you find it unappealing .... Sorry.  It's called sharing.  Try it.  You might like it Mikey.



That being said.  Here is a scythe snath I finished last week. 

Those same torpid readers will remember that a few years ago I was struggling with how to harvest acres and acres of organic cereal grains.  Without using machinery that needs imported Vietnamese engines, fuel, lubricants, Japanese bearings, and Chinese O-Rings.

This particular snath is the 20th or so that I have formed.  It is a Nara / Bamboo laminate with a Manga forward grip.   

The Nara was reclaimed from a door frame in the original shack that was on the property.  I had the chance to talk to a Lola that was a girl when it was built.  That was 70 years ago.

Hard, HARD, damned wood.  It dulled the carbide blade on my Shop-smith something fierce.  And that was before I hit the nails.

I tried to steam bend it, that failed when the plywood box de-laminated and fell apart.  So I finished the curvature with a boiling water bend.

Cured it for 6 months.  Damp then dry.  Cool then hot.

Cuts like a champ.